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HEALTHY LIVING AND SOCIAL CARE SCRUTINY COMMITTEE

 

 

Minutes of a meeting held on 13th March, 2017.

 

Present:  Councillor R.L. Traherne (Chairman); Councillor Dr. I.J. Johnson (Vice-Chairman); Councillors Ms. J. Aviet, R.J. Bertin, Ms. R. Birch, S.C. Egan, H.C. Hamilton, J.W. Thomas and S.T. Wiliam.

 

 

897     APOLOGY FOR ABSENCE –

 

This was received from Councillor E. Hacker.

 

 

898     DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST –

 

No declarations were received.

 

 

899     MINUTES –

 

RECOMMENDED – T H A T the minutes of the meeting held on 13th February, 2017 be approved as a correct record.

 

 

900     CHAIRMAN’S ANNOUNCEMENT –

 

The Chairman, on behalf of the Committee, took the opportunity to thank the Director of Social Services for his leadership of the Directorate.  He added that the Director, who was retiring would be missed and that the Council was very fortunate to have had him lead Social Services for many years.

 

As it was the Chairman’s last meeting, he stated that he would like to think that the Committee had provided reassurance and robust challenge.  He thanked the Committee Members for their contributions, as well as the Director, the Heads of Services, the Democratic and Scrutiny Services Officer and all other officers who had attended meetings and provided invaluable support.

 

Also, on behalf of the officers, the Director of Social Services extended thanks to the Members for their contribution to the development of Social Services.  He added that he was sure that all officers were very grateful and appreciative of the role and leadership provided by the Members.  The Director also talked about the level of challenge and scrutiny provided by the Committee, which had been immensely productive and purposeful.

  

 

901     REQUEST FOR CONSIDERATION OF MATTER (DR. I.J. JOHNSON) – PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FACILITY AT PENARTH LEISURE CENTRE –

 

For this item, the Committee welcomed Mr. Geoff Walsh, the Director of Capital, Estates and Facilities and also Ms. Rhian Bond, the Head of Primary Care. 

 

In introducing his Request for Consideration, Councillor Dr. I.J. Johnson stated there were two parts to his request.  The first related to providing an explanation of the process in reaching the decision to locate a primary health facility at Penarth Leisure Centre.  The second element related to what issues had been experienced by the Health Board and what impact would this have on Council services at Penarth Leisure Centre.

 

In reply, Mr. Walsh stated that this was an exciting project for the Health Board that had started many years ago in connection with the Surgery at Station Road.  It was considered that this building was no longer fit for purpose and there were a number of difficulties in maintaining a surgery at its current location.  These included the current lease on the building and the fact that the premises did not provide easy access for older people and people with disabilities.  Mr. Walsh also stated that, approximately six years ago, the Health Board looked at some other surplus sites for a new GP practice and this need was highlighted by the Older People’s Commissioner at a recent meeting with the Chair of the Health Board.  The Health Board had given assurance to the Commissioner that the issues would be looked at.  The Health Board then contacted the Vale Council to explain the need to develop a facility at Penarth Leisure Centre that would fit in with the agenda of providing health and well-being services.  Mr. Walsh added that this would be of benefit to patients - for example, by offering better access to reablement services. 

 

Further to these points, Ms. Bond explained that the Health Board was working with the local GPs who would be fully consulted upon the proposals, as would the Community Health Council.  She reiterated Mr. Walsh’s previous comments regarding the current surgery not being fit for purpose and that the current plans were aimed at expanding the range of services provided in order to support the growing needs of patients.  Mr. Walsh also added that the Health Board was looking at other outpatient services that could be located at the Leisure Centre, although this was still ongoing.

 

A Committee Member queried the outcome of the consultation, which had indicated that distance and travel were concerns for local residents.  In reply, Ms. Bond stated that the Health Board had evaluated a recent transport survey which showed that some patients would walk to their surgery.  The survey also indicated that there were a lot of patients who already travelled some distance by car. 

 

In reply to a Member’s query regarding how the Health Board would ensure that the service at the new facility would remain viable, Ms. Bond stated that a key challenge was in relation to the recruitment of GPs and so there was a need to look at the skill mix.  She added that the Health Board would be considering the services that could be provided with a more extensive mix of health and well-being services.  It was, however, too early to comment on this piece of work as consultation with the GPs needed to be undertaken. 

 

A Committee Member queried the timescales in relation to the Health Board’s proposals.  Mr. Walsh in response advised that there were no other facilities like this and that this was one of three or four examples of trying to develop a Health and Well-being Centre.  A business case was in the process of being devised and Welsh Government was aware of funding requirements.  It was envisaged that it would take another 12 months to formalise proposals and it would be in the region of three years before the facility was up and running. 

 

In being asked to relay some of his thoughts, the Operational Manager – Leisure stated that the potential for the new facility would sit nicely with the need to attract new visitors and also in regard to the synergies around health and well-being.  He referred to the possibility of complementing the work of the National Exercise Referral Scheme and that it was hoped that the new facility would increase the use of ancillary services at the Leisure Centre, such as the café.  One other advantage of the new facility for patients would be in having a better waiting room.  He also referred to the challenges around attracting people to use their local leisure facilities and this new Centre would be useful to address this issue.  There would also be better utilisation of facilities such as the car park, and discussion was ongoing with regard to a replacement of the tennis court.  Finally, the Operational Manager stated that Legacy Leisure were very keen on the new proposals as these were likely to lead to increased activity at the Leisure Centre.

 

A Committee Member asked whether there would be any change to the running and management of Penarth Leisure Centre and what were the views of the partners involved in the proposal?  The Operational Manager Leisure advised that the new facility would be seen as a Health Board building and a separate entity to the Leisure Centre, although there would be a shared entrance.  He added that there would be no change to the management of Penarth Leisure Centre.  Mr Walsh also explained that, in terms of partners, this would be around the GPs who seemed willing and keen to be involved.  The key element was about looking at a range of other services that could be located there which would be of benefit to the local community.  Mr Walsh stated that there would be discussion with Social Services and that a project team would shortly be set up. It was therefore important to have Legacy Leisure involved.

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the update regarding the Local Health Board proposals for a new health and well-being facility adjacent to Penarth Leisure Centre be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T an update on the proposals be provided in twelve months’ time.

 

Reason for recommendations

 

(1&2)  To ensure that the Committee is aware of potential implications of the proposed development

 

 

902     RESHAPING SERVICES: NEW BUSINESS MODEL FOR VISIBLE SERVICES AND TRANSPORT (REF) –

 

Cabinet, on 20th February, 2017, was presented with a new business model for the Visible Services and Transport Division.

 

In November 2014, Cabinet had approved the Reshaping Services Strategy which aimed to reshape the Council to enable it to meet the future needs of citizens of the Vale of Glamorgan.  Within the context of Visible Services and Transport, reshaping savings of £300,000 were required during the 2016/17 financial year, £525,000 in 2017/18 and £1.375m in 2018/19. 

 

A review, led by the Director of Environment and Housing and the Head of Visible Services and Transport, sought to develop a new target operating model for service delivery.  A copy of the Executive Summary of the alternative service delivery review was attached at Appendix B to the Cabinet report. 

 

The proposed model comprised the following areas:

 

1.         A Neighbourhood Services Group divided into Operations and Healthy Living and Performance

2.         An Single Engineering Group

3.         An Integrated Transport Unit Passenger Transport and Policy Team

4.         A Construction and Development Group.

5.         A Business Support Unit for the Directorate

 

It was proposed that the business model would deliver a total annual budget saving of £900,000 (with part year savings being delivered in 2017/18 and the remainder in 2018/19).  At this stage, it was anticipated that there would be no adverse impact on protected groups.  Once embedded and reviewed, a further phase of work would be undertaken in order to achieve the financial savings required in future years.

 

A Committee Member queried whether front line functions would be protected.  In reply, the Head of Visible Services and Transport stated that the report showed the total split of Full Time Equivalent staff for front line office and back office functions.  It had been identified that there were technically sufficient number of roles for all staff but there was likely to be a skill/ grade mismatch which may result in some redundancies.  This was however unknown at this stage.  So in terms of frontline services, this was being safeguarded with a neutral / positive effect on the main services, although there would be a change to work practices.

 

The Committee, in querying the use of agency staff, questioned whether this would reduce the flexibility of the service.  In reply, the Head of Visible Services and Transport explained that the service made substantial use of agency staff.  There would however be some places for agency staff in the new structure, but this would be more in relation to a seasonal or an ad hoc basis or where there was a need to fill a skill gap.

 

The Chairman questioned the potential for the Construction and Development unit to generate income.  In reply, the Head of Visible Services and Transport advised that the Construction and Development unit was at full capacity with some work subcontracted out.  The main area of income currently related to Highway schemes and that the new model was about changing the way the unit worked to offer a wider service.

 

RECOMMENDED – T H A T the proposals for changes to the Visible and Transport Division, as outlined in the Cabinet report, be endorsed.

 

Reason for recommendation

 

To enable the proposals for changes through the delivery model for Visible Services and Transport to be progressed.

 

 

903     REVENUE AND CAPITAL MONITORING FOR THE PERIOD 1ST APRIL 20176 TO 31ST JANUARY 2017 (DSS) –

 

The Operational Manager for Accountancy presented the report, the purpose of which was to advise of the position in respect of revenue and capital expenditure for the period 1st April, 2016 to 31st January, 2017 regarding those budget which formed the Committee’s remit.

 

The projected outturn for the Social Services Directorate was an adverse variance of £300,000 when compared to the amended budget.  A table and graph setting out the variance between the profiled budget and actual expenditure was attached at Appendix 1 to the report.

 

Children and Young People Services – It was projected that this service would outturn with an underspend of £400,000.  Work had been ongoing to ensure that children were placed in the most appropriate and cost effective placements.  This had included our success in significantly reducing the number of children placed in residential care, from an average of 23 in 2014/15 to a current average of 10.  It should however be noted that the number of Looked After Children had increased during the course of the year, placing considerable pressure on the Council’s in-house fostering resources and increasing the Council’s reliance on independent fostering placements.  Given this pressure and the complexity of some of these children, the outturn position could fluctuate with a change in the number of Looked After Children and / or their need for independent fostering or residential placements.

 

Adult Services – It was projected that the service would outturn with a £700,000 overspend at year end.  The Community Care Package budget could outturn with a variance of up to £900,000 by year end.  The final outturn was difficult to predict due to a number of factors.  However, as at 31st January 2017, deferred income received had exceeded the annual budget for 2016/17 and therefore a favourable variance of £200,000 had been included as part of the Community Care package heading.  It should be noted that this was one off funding and was not guaranteed in future years.  It was also anticipated that there would be a £200,000 underspend elsewhere in the budget due to early implementation of Reshaping Services savings and also by maximising the use of the Intermediate Care Fund (ICF) grant.

 

Leisure Services – This budget was currently breaking even and this was also the anticipated position at year end.

 

In relation to the Social Services Programme, the Directorate was currently required to find savings totalling £2.257m by the end of 2019/20 and this target was analysed by year in the following table.  The surplus shown and the savings brought forward figures were as a result of the foster carer recruitment project, which was being developed in addition to the required savings targets.  This surplus could be used to mitigate any increase in savings to be found in future years.

 

Year

Savings   Required

£000

Savings Identified

£000

In Year   Surplus/ (Shortfall)

£000

Cumulative   Surplus/   (Shortfall)

£000

Savings   Brought Forward

 

110

110

110

2016/17

1,002

1,078

76

186

2017/18

605

605

0

186

2018/19

320

320

0

186

2019/20

330

330

0

186

TOTAL

2,257

2,443

 

 

 

Appendix 2 to the report provided an update on the individual areas of saving within the Social Services Budget Programme.

 

Within Adult Services, £100,000 of the full year saving generated from the Hafod Homes transfer had been offset against the £300,000 saving for Residential Services.  Currently, there were no other approved plans in place to find the remaining £200,000 of this saving.  Further consideration would have to be given to the way in which the saving could be fully achieved.  With regard to the Care Package Budget Reduction, while there was significant pressure on this budget, schemes had been put in place to deliver savings in this area by transferring domiciliary care clients to direct payments, by putting in place additional reablement capacity and by establishing a review team.

 

Appendix 3 to the report detailed financial progress on the Capital Programme as at 31st January, 2017.

 

Rhoose Road Health and Safety Works – The allocation of £24,000 would no longer be required for this scheme and it had been requested that £24,000 be carried forward to 2017/18 and utilised for further Fire Precaution works across Social Services homes.

 

Romilly Mess Room – It had been requested that £65,000 be carried forward into 2017/18.  The scheme had been delayed due to ongoing negotiations with Welsh Water and Planning to redesign the foul water system from the original design. Preparatory works would be completed this financial year.

 

Barry and Penarth Leisure Centre Upgrade Changing Rooms – It had been requested that £104,000 be carried forward into 2017/18.  The process of appointing consultants to undertake this scheme was underway and design work was due to commence imminently, with a planned on site start date of November 2017.

 

Colcot Pitches – It had been requested that £307,000 be carried forward into 2017/18.  Work had commenced on site, however, the scheme was not expected to be completed until May 2017 and the progress of works would be subject to weather conditions.

 

Parks and Grounds Maintenance Asset Renewal – A scheme within the Parks and Ground Maintenance Asset Renewal budget, namely Alexandra Park / Windsor Gardens New Entrances, required further investment than originally planned.   It had therefore been requested to slip the £14,000 budget into 2017/18 in order to use it as match funding for a Heritage Lottery Funding bid, which would enable the full scheme to be completed.

 

Appendix 4 to the report provided non-financial information on capital construction schemes.  From this Appendix, it could be seen that most of the schemes were now complete.

 

A Committee Member, in referring to the improved picture in regard to the projected overspend, queried whether this was still the direction of travel.  In reply, the Head of Adult Services stated that a reduction in the overspend was as a result of a number of different factors such as an increase in the deferred income and the use of the Intermediate Care Fund.  He added that money committed for care packages was difficult to project, although this did become easier as the end of year approached.

 

The Chairman, in referring to the £300,000 savings for Residential Services, queried where the remaining £200,000 would be found.  In reply, the Head of Adult Services advised that savings in this area for previous years had been in the region of £500,000 and it was hoped that the savings target could be met through the Reshaping Services projects, some of which were ahead of schedule.  He added that this saving target would also be reviewed.

 

A Committee Member, in referring to a new reablement unit, queried the impact this was having on care packages.  In response, the Head of Adult Services stated that it was too early to tell and he advised that money from the Intermediate Care Fund had been utilised in order to create 6 beds in an enhanced reablement unit at Ty Dyfan.  He went on to state that the impact of this was difficult to calculate because it was hard to predict what would have happened if the unit was not there.  He also advised that the number of hospital bed days had been considered and a reduction in this was extremely beneficial.  Members were advised that Social Services would continue to monitor this area and an evaluation would be undertaken at the end of the year.

 

Further to these comments, a Committee Member stated that he had recently visited the unit at Ty Dyfan and had spoken to a number of service users who had nothing but praise.  He stated that he was convinced that this was the way to go in order to maintain people’s independence. 

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the position with regard to the 2016/17 revenue and capital monitoring be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T progress made in delivering the Social Services Budget Programme be noted.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       That Members are aware of the position with regard to the 2016/17 revenue and capital monitoring relevant to this Committee.

 

(2)       That Members are aware of the progress made to date on the Social Services Budget Programme.

 

 

904     VALE OF GLAMORGAN WELL-BEING OBJECTIVES AND IMPROVEMENT PLAN PART 1 (IMPROVEMENT OBJECTIVES 2017/18) (DSS) –

 

The purpose of the report was to seek endorsement of the Council’s proposed approach to discharging its duties in relation to the Local Government (Wales) Measure 2009 and the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 to publish Well-being Objectives and annual Improvement Objectives.

 

The Corporate Plan 2016-2020 was approved by Cabinet on 22nd February 2016 and by Council on 2nd March 2016 following extensive consultation with key stakeholders and partners.  The Plan sets out the Council's Well-being Outcomes and Objectives for the next four years as well as its vision, values with reference to the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015.  The Corporate Plan four Well-being Outcomes and associated eight Well-being Objectives are

 

Well-being Outcome 1: An inclusive and Safe Vale

  • Objective 1:  Reducing poverty and social exclusion.
  • Objective 2: Providing decent homes and safe communities.

Well-being Outcome 2: An Environmentally Responsible and Prosperous Vale

  • Objective 3: Promoting regeneration, economic growth and employment.
  • Objective 4: Promoting sustainable development and protecting our environment.

Well-being Outcome 3: An Aspirational and Culturally Vibrant Vale

  • Objective 5: Raising overall standards of achievement.
  • Objective 6: Valuing culture and diversity.

Well-being Outcome 4: An Active and Healthy Vale

  • Objective 7: Encouraging and promoting active and healthy lifestyles.
  • Objective 8: Safeguarding those who are vulnerable and promoting independent living.

Significant work had been undertaken to ensure that the Council’s Well-being Objectives and priority actions reflected the key priorities for the Vale of Glamorgan, thus ensuring the Council was focusing on the areas in need of the most improvement and those of greatest impact to the Council’s residents' well-being. These priorities were also reflected in the Council's Service Plans for 2017-21.

 

In previous years, the Council's Improvement Objectives had consisted of a small number of priority areas of focus where the Council had identified that significant improvement was required.  These had always been informed by the Council’s Corporate Plan priorities and the annual Council Self-Assessment.  By moving towards a more integrated planning model, the Council’s improvement priorities were now the same priorities that were outlined within its Corporate Plan and therefore no longer sat in isolation to this Plan.  The Council’s focus had been on setting its Well-being Outcomes and Objectives outlined in the Corporate Plan, so that the Council maximised its contribution to the Well-being Goals of the Wellbeing of Future Generations (Wales) Act whilst dovetailing this with its corporate planning processes. This demonstrated not only the Council’s contribution to the Well-being Goals but also represented the breadth of activities undertaken as a Council and by integrating the Act's five ways of working within the Council’s planning framework.

 

Having considered the report, the Committee

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the proposed approach to discharging the Council’s duties to publish Wellbeing and Improvement Objectives under the Local Government (Wales) Measure 2009 and the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 be endorsed.

 

(2)       T H A T the Corporate Plan Well-being Objectives as the Council’s Well-being Objectives for the purposes of the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 be endorsed.

 

(3)       T H A T the Corporate Plan Well-being Objectives and associated priority actions for 2017/18 that formed the basis of the Council’s Improvement Objectives for 2017/18 be endorsed.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To ensure that the Council is fully discharging its statutory duties to set and report on Well-being and Improvement Objectives.

 

(2)       To ensure that the Council meets the requirements of the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 to publish its Well-being Objectives by 31st March, 2017.

 

(3)       To ensure the Council continues to meet the requirements of the Local Government (Wales) Measure 2009 to set annual improvement priorities for 2017/18.

 

 

905     VALE OF GLAMORGAN COUNCIL ANNUAL SELF-ASSESSMENT (MD) –

 

The purpose of the report was to provide Members with the strategic self-assessment of the Council’s performance for the period April 2015 to December 2016 that identified achievements and priorities for 2017/18.

 

The Vale of Glamorgan Annual Self-Assessment was a position statement on the Council’s performance over the past year in delivering its priorities.  It was intended to provide an honest and balanced account of the Council’s achievements and identified areas where further progress was required.  The information contained in the report (in particular the Service Self-Assessments contained in Appendix C) would be used to inform the Council’s Service Plans for 2017/18.

 

As part of the Annual Self-Assessment, a series of actions were identified in order to drive improvements during the following year.  A summary of progress to date in relation to the priorities identified in last year’s Self-Assessment was provided in the Corporate Improvement Action Plan at Appendix A.  Of the 57 actions identified, 32 had been completed and 25 were ongoing. 

 

The Chairman, in referring to the rate of Delayed Transfers of Care, commented that this still remained a pressure point and queried the reason for the change in definition of the performance definition to clients aged 75 and over.  In response, the Head of Adult Services stated that this was a decision made by Welsh Government as this was a national performance indicator and was probably due to an increased focus on the older population who were more likely to be in hospital.

 

Following a query regarding whether staff were satisfied in the approach taken around the Self-Assessment, the Director of Social Services stated that the Council had very well motivated staff who would be interested in and take responsibility for the relevant performance indicators for their team and area of work.  He also added that the Vale of Glamorgan was very fortunate in that the Council had very well qualified and experienced staff, who usually stayed for a long period of time.

 

A Committee Member queried whether Social Services had enough resources.  In response, the Director stated that this was dependent on what the Council wanted to aspire to in the areas of Social Services and Health.  Councils also depend on leadership from Welsh Government and because Welsh Government’s overall Settlement was reducing, so was the amount provided to Councils.  Therefore, it was becoming more difficult to square the money allocated to the increase in demand and the complexity of cases.  The Director added that Social Services had to remain in budget while continuing to provide the same quality of care.  The Director also stated that his Annual Report provided a more detailed analysis of Social Services, which he hoped was user friendly and honest about the challenges and priorities facing the Directorate. 

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the Council’s Annual Self-Assessment Report, including identified priorities for 2017/18, be endorsed.

 

(2)       T H A T the contents of the Self-Assessment as the basis for service planning for 2017/18 be endorsed.

 

Reason for recommendations

 

(1)       To meet the requirements of the Local Government (Wales) Measure 2009 to undertake a self-assessment of all Council services and to use this information as the basis to drive continuous improvement of Council services.

 

(2)       To confirm the priorities identified within the Self-Assessment relating to Well-being Outcome 4: An active and healthy Vale which represents a fair reflection of the challenges facing both the Council and the services contributing to the corporate health priorities.  In addition, to ensure that the Council identifies and takes appropriate action to address its improvement priorities.

 

           

906     SERVICE PLANS 2017-21: ADULT SERVICES, CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE SERVICES, BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND INNOVATION AND VISIBLE SERVICES AND TRANSPORT (DSS) -

 

The purpose of the report was to present the Adult Services, Children and Young People Services, Business Management and Innovation and Visible Services and Transport Service Plans for 2017-21. 

 

Service Plans for 2017-21 specifically identified how each Head of Service would contribute towards achievement of Corporate Plan Well-being Outcomes by asking two questions: 

  • "Which well-being objectives does the service contribute to and what actions will we be taking this year to achieve these?"
  • "How will we manage our resources to achieve these actions and support our service?"

Informed by the Annual Self-Assessment, the Service Plans also comprised a brief overview of the issues facing the service against each of the corporate health perspectives (Risk, Customer Focus, Resources - workforce, finance, assets, ICT). The Plans included an action plan for how resources would be used to support the delivery of well-being outcome actions as well as managing risks, collaboration and engagement activities.

 

Appendix 1 contained the Service Plans for Adult Services, Children and Young People Services, Business Management and Innovation and Visible Services and Transport Service. Key areas of note within the Service Plans were: 

  • Section 1 - Introduction: Set the context for the Service Plan and provided an overview of the service area, the purpose of the Plan, and the key service considerations which had informed development of the Plan.
  • Section 2 – The Council’s priorities for 2017-21: Outlines the specific actions that the service would be taking during 2017/18 to contribute towards the Corporate Plan Well-being Objectives and Outcomes.  It also identified the key enabling actions the service would be taking to support its achievement of the Well-being Outcomes, for example through reshaping of its services.
  • Section 3 - Outlines what actions the Service would undertake during 2017/18 to contribute to Year 2 of the Corporate Plan Well-being Outcomes and Objectives.  It also described how the service would manage its resources to deliver its priorities in the Service Plan and outlines key workforce development priorities, significant ICT projects, required budget savings and areas of focus in relation to assets, procurement and major capital projects.  This section also identifies how the service would engage with stakeholders and work in partnership / collaborate to achieve its priorities and incorporated a service risk evaluation.
  • Appendices A and B (within the Service Plan) contain the Service Improvement Action Plan for 2017/18.  This identifies planned service actions, intended outcomes and key milestones, relevant performance measures to demonstrate progress, responsible officer, timescales for completion and the anticipated resources requirements of planned actions.
  • The Children and Young People Service Plan incorporates its contribution to one other Well-being Outcome, namely Outcome 2.  For ease of reference, Members will note that the proposed actions relating to this Well-being Outcome area have been struck through within the Plan to indicate the areas that did not form part of the remit of the Committee.
  • The Visible Services and Transport Service Plan also incorporates its contribution to two other Well-being Outcomes, namely Outcomes 2 and 3.  For ease of reference, Members will note that the proposed actions relating to these Outcome areas have been struck through to indicate the areas that did not form part of the remit of the Committee.

The Adult Services, Children and Young People Services, Business Management and Innovation Services and Visible Services and Transport would now develop Team Plans to underpin and deliver their Service Plans actions.

 

A Committee Member, in referring to the cross-cutting nature of actions relating to Welsh language and Equalities, commented that this was something that should be reported to this Committee. In response, the Head of Adult Services stated that Welsh language and equalities was at the forefront of work in every department of the Council and he felt that the actions should be in all Service Plans.  Further to these comments, the Director for Social Services stated that this would be raised with the Corporate Centre as service planning was an evolving process.  The Committee agreed that Welsh language and Equalities should be an area considered by this Committee.

 

With regard to the risk evaluation section on Service Plans, the Committee agreed that the order should change so that the highest risks come first.

 

In querying action reference AH8 within Adult Services and the need to increase the range of activities available via New Horizons, a Committee Member stated that it was unusual to make specific reference to one organisation.  In reply, the Head of Adult Services stated that this was an internal day service and was a Council organisation.  A review of this service area related to activities provided to individuals, as a way to increase choice as some may not be able to or want to attend day services for the full day. 

 

The Chairman, in referring to the action within Adult Services to explore options for addressing recruitment for critical posts, queried the rationale for this.  In reply, the Head of Adult Services explained that this would vary at specific times and was not limited to one service area.  He referred to the need to be more creative in regard to recruitment methods.

 

In relation to the Service Plan for Children and Young People Services, a Committee Member queried whether more safeguarding awareness raising could be undertaken with schools.  In reply, the Head of Children and Young People Services stated that there were various aspects about keeping on top of this and the key was ensuring that all staff attended awareness sessions and individuals were aware of other considerations including child sexual exploitation and sexually harmful behaviour.   There was also the need to encourage children to have their own self-awareness around safeguarding. 

 

A Committee Member queried the action to extend the pilot for Direct Family Support Plus and undertake a cost / benefit analysis.  In reply, the Head of Children and Young People Services stated that this had been funded via a reduction in the number of children in residential care but, to sustain this, there was a need to have greater support in place for children at the edge of care.  Initial feedback from this pilot was positive. 

 

Following a question regarding the key issues around the recruitment of staff, the Head of Children and Young People Services advised that there had been healthy interest in posts, for example within the area of Adoption, while in other areas the recruitment picture had been problematic.  This was particularly the case in relation to the Intake and Family Support Team where, in keeping with the national trend, the recruitment of permanent Social Workers had presented a challenge.  She added that, although there had been some recent success in recruitment to certain posts, the Service would advertise again.  Further to these comments, the Director explained that Social Workers were in demand and the Council had reinforced its career progression plans to include endorsement of a Social Work Career and Professional Education Framework and progression payments to support recruitment and retention of staff. 

 

In reply to a query regarding the continued reduction and regionalisation of grant funding, the Head of Children and Young People Services stated that the challenge related to ensuring that the Vale received its correct proportion of funding and that the outcomes to be achieved were clearly understood.

 

With regard to the Business Management and Innovation Service Plan, the Chairman queried the action to increase the number of social enterprises and he commented that one potential scheme related to the Meals on Wheels Services and he queried whether there were any others being considered.  In reply, the Head of Resource Management and Safeguarding stated that this was a key element of the Social Services and Well-being Act, particularly in relation to preventative services, but there was nothing else specific at the moment. 

 

In terms of the Visible Services and Transport Service Plan, the Committee queried actions in relation to increasing the level of play for children.  In response, the Operational Manager - Leisure stated that this would be addressed via Reshaping Services with extra focus on play.  The Council was trying to be ambitious when it came to play as this was the first building block towards a healthier and more active lifestyle.

 

A Committee Member commented that is was important to increase the number of people using leisure facilities.  In reply, the Operational Manager – Leisure advised that Legacy Leisure were keen to increase the number of visitors as they could not increase their prices, and so, for them the key element was about increasing footfall.

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the Adult Services, Children and Young People Services, Business Management and Innovation and Visible Services and Transport Service Plans 2017-21 be endorsed.

 

(2)       T H A T Cabinet be advised that the actions relating to Welsh language provision and Equalities have a more important level of responsibility and should also be reported to the Committee.

 

(3)       T H A T Cabinet be advised that the order of risks, as highlighted in the risk evaluation section, be reversed so that the highest areas of risk come first.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To confirm the Service Plans as the primary documents against which performance for the Corporate Plan Well-being Outcome 4 would be measured.

 

(2)       To advise Cabinet of the Committee’s view in relation to the broad level of responsibility regarding the provision of Welsh language and Equalities.

 

(3)       To advise Cabinet of the Committee’s view regarding the order of the risk evaluation.

 

 

907     TARGET SETTING FOR 2017-18 (DSS) –

 

The purpose of the report was to present the proposed targets for improvement for 2017-18 for existing performance indicators aligned to Well-being Outcome 4 – An Active and Healthy Vale priorities.

 

Appendix 1 to the report outlined the proposed targets for the Healthy Living and Social Care Scrutiny Committee and included all relevant performance indicators that fitted within the remit of the Committee.  Targets had been set for those performance indicators that were continuing into 2017-18.  A number of indicator amendments and deletions were proposed for 2017-18 following a review of the existing corporate performance measures.

 

27 performance indicators were proposed to be carried forward and collected in 2017-18 under Well-being Outcome 4.  Of the 27 performance measures, five had set targets to improve on the previous year’s performance and three had targets that had been set to remain the same when compared with the previous year.  Targets had been set for 19 performance measures, however these were new measures which were set to establish baseline performance in 2016-17 consequently no trend data was available to determine a direction of travel.  Targets were not set for eight measures, seven which were new for 2016-17.  Proposed targets would be reported to Members once Quarter 4 performance data was available.  A target was not appropriate for the remaining measure (CPM/060 relating to re-registrations of children on Local Authority Child Protection Register). 

 

There were an additional 15 measures being reported as part of the statutory national data set for Social Services.  Targets had been proposed for three measures, two showing an improvement on performance in the previous year and the remaining measure, a target below previous performance.

 

In querying the target set for the number of people completing the national exercise referral scheme, the Operational Manager for Leisure stated that this was 40% and was based on national figures.  The completion rate also related to the number of people who were referred to the scheme. 

 

With regard to the performance indicators listed for deletion, the Committee requested that commentary on these should be provided via an end of year report as it would be helpful to still monitor them.

 

The Committee, in querying the change of definition to the rate of Delayed Transfers of Care, was advised that discussions on cases between the Council and the Health Board would include all clients and not just those over 75, which the new indicator would be monitoring.  It was also important to recognise that this indicator was based on a day’s sample taken each month and it was less useful as a way to compare the performance of Local Authorities.

 

RECOMMENDED – T H A T the proposed targets for 2017-18 aligned to Well-being Outcome 4 priorities be endorsed.

 

Reason for recommendation

 

To ensure the Council reports a relevant set of performance indicators against which it can demonstrate achievement of its Well-being Outcomes and consistently sets challenging yet realistic performance improvement targets for those priorities in line with requirements under the Local Government (Wales) Measure 2009.

 

 

908     ACCOMMODATION WITH CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE (DSS) –

 

The Head of Resource Management and Safeguarding presented the report, the purpose of which was to update on the progress made in developing a coherent strategy for the way in which the Council could help to ensure that the needs for older people for Accommodation with Care would be met.

 

The Council's Commissioning Strategy for Older People's Services 2011-18 drew attention to the challenges involved in the provision of sufficient accommodation with care facilities in a context where the market and policy changes were not responding quickly enough to higher levels of need.  It identified the imperative for putting in place new service models which would provide increased support options at all stages of the older person's pathway.

 

The Commissioning Strategy was designed to make best use of the resources available to Social Services by encouraging a reablement approach to care and reducing the pressure to accommodate growing numbers of older people in traditional residential settings.  It involved developing further the use of assistive technology and a focus on partnership with other Local Authorities, the NHS, the third and private sectors to ensure that people were supported proportionately and in a way that maintained independence as long as possible.

 

Efforts to put in place the new service models had remained a priority for the Council.  For example, the regional Intermediate Care Fund (ICF) grant in 2016/17 was used to sponsor a number of relevant schemes, following the approach adopted in shaping previous Regional Collaboration Fund and ICF programmes.  Each of the ICF projects had been shown to be effective in reducing the need for hospital admissions or reducing the length of the individual's stay in hospital.  Case studies for these projects had been included in the evaluation of these programmes, to demonstrate their effectiveness.

 

These matters were reported to the Scrutiny Committee on a regular basis.  The Social Services Directorate and the Housing Service have developed the following services / projects: 

  • Redlands, Penarth – Accommodation Solutions Reablement units;
  • A Respite Flat within the Extra Care facility at Golau Caredig, Barry;
  • Reablement beds within Ty Dyfan residential care home, Barry;
  • Ongoing development of the Vale Community Resource Service.

The Commissioning Strategy still aligned well with the objectives set in the Corporate Plan 2016-2020, especially Well-being Outcome 4: Objective 8 which had as its main action a review of accommodation with care options for older people and developing the Council’s commissioning strategy for future years.

 

The Council had been working on development of an effective Accommodation with Care Strategy for a significant period of time.  It had been a very incremental process, necessarily so because of inherent complexity in mapping a wide range of accommodation options, the need to understand the way in which markets operated locally, the number of policy changes at UK and Welsh Government levels, etc.

 

The Social Services Well-being (Wales) Act 2014 states that the Cardiff and Vale region must complete a market position statement.  This had been commissioned on a regional basis through the ICF.  The Council anticipated that the report would be ready by the end of this financial year but it had been delayed until June because of the need to ensure that all relevant policy was encapsulated.  At the same time, the Population Needs Assessment had been completed and awaited endorsement by the statutory partners.  The Regional Partnership Board must provide an annual plan in response to its findings by March 2019 and this would need to reflect the commissioning intentions of the Vale of Glamorgan Council.  At the same time, the implementation plan for the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014 focused upon the role of preventative services.  This remained a key priority for this Council and additional capacity had been made available to lead this important piece of work.

 

Additionally, from 2018, the two Local Authorities and the University Health Board were required to jointly commission services.  The legislation mandated that we pool budgets for care home placements but there were clear advantages to pooling resources (including assets) in other areas of health and social care.  It was possible that accommodation with care could be one such area.

 

The Chairman, in referring to the Strategy as a whole, commented that making progress was proving to be a challenge, impacted upon by factors such as Welsh Government requirements to complete a Population Needs Assessment.  He queried whether this should be a corporate priority.  In reply, the Head of Resource Management and Safeguarding stated that it was correct that this had been affected by such things as the Population Needs Assessment and producing the market position statement.  It was important for other Council departments and Council partners to become involved and it was envisioned that this would be progressed during the next financial year. 

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the work that has been completed to date be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T a further report on progress in developing a coherent strategy for older people accommodation with care be provided in 12 months’ time.

 

Reason for recommendations

 

(1&2)  To ensure that Members continue to exercise effective oversight of this important area of work.

 

 

909     UPDATE REPORT ON DOMICILIARY CARE WITHIN THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN (DSS) –

 

The report advised that the Vale of Glamorgan had a diverse range of domiciliary care providers.  There were currently 38 domiciliary care providers registered with the Council’s approved provider list, all of which supported citizens on a regular basis.  The independent sector provided 96% of the care hours commissioned to support the assessed care and support needs of service users.  The Council had 20 providers who offered domiciliary care packages to ten people or fewer, with two providers providing support to over 100 clients per week.

 

Members would be aware of the financial challenges facing the domiciliary care sector.  At the beginning of the current financial year (2016/17) the Council increased its domiciliary care fees by 3.5%.  A number of providers made representations to advise that this rise was not sufficient to enable them to respond properly to the demand of the National Living Wage, pension auto-enrolment and travel time directives.  Following several meetings with officers, the Council introduced a minimum hourly rate that would be used when commissioning domiciliary care, which was implemented from 3rd October, 2016. 

 

Members noted that fee levels remained a concern for providers.  They reported that this issue had the potential to make some domiciliary care businesses unsustainable in the short to medium term.  Several of the providers had advised the Council of their intention to request increased rates for the 2017/18 financial year, citing the UK Homecare Association’s toolkit for calculating the cost of domiciliary care.

 

The Intermediate Care Fund (ICF) had enabled the Council to start an outcomes based commissioning pilot in October 2016, operating on a small scale with a willing and innovative provider.  It was hoped to extend this approach following initial analysis of the information obtained from the pilot.  The approach was intended to support the sector, provide better outcomes for service users and to be more cost effective.

 

The report advised that there were significant resource implications as a consequence of the current pressure on domiciliary care providers.  A 3.5% increase in fees for 2016/17 and introduction of a base rate had been implemented in recognition of the challenges faced by the sector. 

 

A Committee Member queried the robustness of the independent care sector, given the range and size of providers in the Vale.  In reply, Members were advised that diversity of the sector could be a strength, although some providers found it more difficult to meet and react to challenges.  Key for the Council was how it reacted to these challenges and Members were advised that there was a good relationship with providers and the Council was always willing to listen to concerns.  Sustainability and capacity were two issues, particularly in regard to the more rural parts of the Vale, which meant that there were additional challenges when commissioning care.

 

In relation to cost pressures for independent care providers, the Director stated that in terms of the setting of fees, an offer to the sector would be made once there was more clarity about a range of factors, including increased revenue provided by Welsh Government.  He stated that providers had been given an above inflation increase last year.  Providers also understood that there would be a delay and that payments would be backdated.  The matter would be progressed as a matter of urgency. 

 

With regard to the outcome-based commissioning pilot for domiciliary care, the Committee was advised that money for this was accessed via the Intermediate Care Fund.  This was on a small scale but positive feedback had been provided by service users.  An evaluation of this pilot would be conducted.

 

In response to a question about whether the outcome-based commissioning pilot would generate significant savings The Head of Adult Services stated that, in terms of numbers, this was unlikely.  It was hoped, however, that the new approach would improve capacity.

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the work of the Directorate to ensure that domiciliary care providers and workforce are able to deliver a high quality, sustainable domiciliary care service to residents of the Vale of Glamorgan be noted.

 

Reason for recommendations

 

(1&2)  To ensure that Members continue to exercise effective oversight of an important function undertaken by the Social Services Directorate.

 

 

910     UPDATE ON IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELL-BEING (WALES) ACT 2014 (DSS) –

 

The Director of Social Services presented the report and advised that this was the eleventh report received by the Committee which provided an update in respect of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014. 

 

The report updated information on the following areas: 

  • Progress against each of the regional work streams
  • Exception reporting regarding issues and challenges that had arisen due to implementation of the Act
  • An update on the role and experience of the “Change Champions”
  • An overview of the training that had been delivered to staff
  • Progress in relation to the DEWIS information portal
  • Performance management arrangements
  • Plans for completing the Population Needs Assessment.

With regard to the Welsh Community Care Information System (WCCIS), the Director advised that this was being rolled out across Wales and would be implemented by all seven Health Boards and 22 Local Authorities.  This was an immensely complex undertaking and the Vale of Glamorgan would be implementing the new system in the autumn.  The Director referred to the challenges being experienced by the Health Boards which had more complex data systems or none at all.  It was important, therefore, that support be provided by Health Boards as the key aim was to provide a fully integrated information system for the Social Care and Health sectors. 

 

A Committee Member requested an update in relation to advocacy services and queried whether Social Services had sought legal advice.  In reply, Members were advised that the Council’s internal legal service had helped with regard to interpretation of the Act and particularly in relation to the commissioning of an independent advocacy service for children. 

 

In relation to the DEWIS Cymru information portal, Members were advised that this had been implemented, although there were some issues regarding capacity for keeping content current.  This had been identified as a priority area for the future work programme.  Members noted that thousands of professionals would be feeding information into the portal and there was a requirement to periodically review information on the portal.  If this was not done, then the information would disappear.  It was important, therefore, for organisations to take ownership of the information on the portal and to ensure that this was up to date. 

 

A Committee Member stated that the main aim of the Act was to give more say to service users and he queried whether this was the case.  In reply, the Head of Resource Management and Safeguarding stated that consultation and surveys of service users was happening and this had been strengthened.  She added that a pilot had just started with the New Horizons day service to examine a potential new approach around citizen engagement. 

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T an update on progress of the regional implementation plan be received in six months’ time.

 

Reason for recommendations

 

(1&2)  To ensure that elected Members are kept informed of the impact of changes in policy and legislative framework which underpins the work of Social Services.

 

 

911     QUARTER 3 (2016-17) PERFORMANCE REPORT: AN ACTIVE AND HEALTHY VALE (DSS) –

 

The report provided the performance results for Quarter 3, 1st April – 31st December, 2016-17 for the Corporate Plan Well-being Outcome 4, An Active and Healthy Vale.

 

The report advised that an overall Green RAG status had been attributed to Well-being Outcome 4 which reflected the good progress made to date in making a difference to the lives of residents and customers.

 

At Quarter 3, 14 out of 16 Corporate Plan actions under Well-being Outcome 4 were on track to be delivered, giving an overall Green performance status.  Limited progress continued to be made in delivery of the Substance Misuse Action Plan (AH2).  This was due to continuing resource issues, it was anticipated that this action would be brought on track in Quarter 4.  In relation to Corporate Safeguarding, significant work had progressed regionally on developing and introducing “alert” forms and procedures. 

 

The report advised that an overall Amber performance status had been attributed to the quarterly measures for this Well-being Outcome.  Of the eight quarterly measures for which data was reported this Quarter, performance had met or exceeded target for six indicators with two missing target by more than 10%.  The two indicators that had missed target related to play scheme attendance and young people looked after whom the Authority was still in contact with and who were engaged in education, training or employment.

 

The Chairman, in querying progress for the percentage of young people looked after who were engaged in education, training or employment, stated that a recent request from the Children’s Commissioner to visit all local authorities in Wales highlighted the need for all Council services to have responsibility.  He queried whether there was anything that the Council could do in order to improve this indicator.  In reply, the Head of Children and Young People Services stated that there was cross directorate work on this, with a management working group monitoring progress against the Corporate Strategy for Children Who Need Care and Support Action Plan.  The Children’s Commissioner was due to visit the Council at the end of March and the Commissioner would be fully briefed on the work in this area. 

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T progress to date in achieving key outcomes in line with the Corporate Plan Well-being Outcome 4 – Residents of the Vale of Glamorgan lead healthy lives and vulnerable people are protected and supported be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the performance results and remedial actions taken to address areas of underperformance be noted.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To ensure the Council demonstrates the progress being made towards achieving its Corporate Plan Well-being Outcomes aimed at making a positive difference to the lives of Vale of Glamorgan citizens.

 

(2)       To ensure the Council is effectively assessing its performance in line with the requirement to secure continuous improvement as outlined in the Local Government Measure (Wales) 2009 and reflecting the requirement of the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act.

 

 

912     3RD QUARTER SCRUTINY DECISION TRACKING OF RECOMMENDATIONS AND UPDATED WORK PROGRAMME SCHEDULE 2016/17 (MD) –

 

The report advised Members of progress in relation to the Committee’s recommendations and to confirm the work programme schedule for the Scrutiny Committee for 2016/17. 

 

Attached at Appendix A was the third quarter decision tracking for October to December 2016, attached at Appendix B was the updated work programme schedule for 2016/17, while Appendix C was a compendium of the work of the Scrutiny Committee undertaken between May 2016 and February 2017.

 

With regard to Appendix A and decision tracking for 8th December, 2016 and recommendation (3) in relation to the setting up of a Members monitoring group for the Leisure Management Contract (Min. No. 592), the Committee agreed that this would be progressed during the next municipal year and so the status of this should be ongoing.

 

Having considered the report, it was subsequently

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the recommendations deemed as complete in Appendix A be accepted as outlined below:

 

10 October 2016 

Min. No. 430 – Presentation   by Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS), Mrs. R. Whittle,   Commissioning Lead – Cardiff and Vale CAMHS – Recommended

(2)   That a further update report on progress   be received in 12 months’ time.

 

 

 

 

Added   to work programme schedule.

Completed

Min. No. 431 – Revenue   and Capital Monitoring for the Period 1st April to 31st   August 2016 (DSS) – Recommended

(2)   That the progress made in delivering the   Social Services Budget Programme be noted and referred to Cabinet for its   consideration.

 

 

 

Cabinet,   on 14th November, 2016, noted the contents of the report.

(Min.   No. C3358 refers)

Completed

Min. No. 433 – Child   Sexual Exploitation (DSS) – Recommended

(2)   That an update report be provided in 12   months’ time.

 

 

Added   to work programme schedule.

Completed

Min. No. 435 – Assistive   Technology and Dementia Care Task and Finish Group (DSS) – Recommended

(1)   That the report be accepted and referred   to Cabinet for consideration.

 

 

(2)   That an update report be provided in 12   months’ time.

 

 

 

(1)   Cabinet, on 14th November,   2016, noted the contents of the report.

(Min.   No. C3360 refers)

Completed

(2)   Added to work programme schedule.

Completed

Min. No. 436 – Update on   Implementation of the Social Services and Well-Being (Wales) Act 2014 (DSS) – Recommended

(2)   That an update be received in March 2017.

 

(3)   That the report be referred to Cabinet for   consideration.

 

 

 

(2)   Added to work programme schedule.

Completed

(3)   Cabinet, on 14th November,   2016, noted the contents of the report and resolved that the further report   be presented to Cabinet in the New Year.

(Min.   No. C3359 refers)

Completed

22 November 2016 

Min. No. 549 – Autistic   Spectrum Disorder: Community Monitoring and Support Project (DSS) – Recommended

(2)   That the Scrutiny Committee receives an   annual update on the work of the project.

 

 

 

Added   to work programme schedule.

Completed

Min. No. 550 – Annual   Report of The Vale, Valleys and Cardiff Regional Adoption Collaborative, 1st   April 2015 to 31st March 2016 (DSS) – Recommended

(2)   That an Annual Report be received in line   with the requirements of the partnership agreement which underpinned the   collaborative.

 

 

 

 

Added   to work programme schedule.

Completed

Min. No. 552 – Reshaping   Services – Review of Respite Care for Adults with Learning Disabilities (DSS)   –   Recommended

(2)   That the report and the views of the   Committee as detailed in the minutes, be referred to Cabinet for its   consideration.

(3)   That Cabinet note the results of the   consultation which indicated that service users and their carers do not wish   to see the closure of Rhoose Road.

(4)   That Cabinet should not make any decisions   on this issue until a further report is brought to this Committee identifying   in greater detail how the personal wellbeing outcomes of service users would   be improved as a result of the closure of Rhoose Road.

 

 

 

 

(2-4)   Cabinet, on 12th December,   2016, noted the contents of the report and resolved that it be considered   alongside Agenda Item 11 of the same matter later in the meeting.

(Min.   No. C3392 refers)

Cabinet   resolved

[1]   That the   contents of the minutes attached at Appendix D to the report from the   Scrutiny Committee Healthy Living and Social Care meeting held on the 22   November, 2016, be noted.

[2]   That the preferred   option as outlined in the report, to close Rhoose Road and use suitable   respite alternatives to meet assessed needs be endorsed.

[3]   That delegated authority be granted to the   Director of Social Services in consultation with the Leader, Cabinet Member   for Housing and Social Care and the Managing Director to undertake and   conclude all necessary actions, including staff consultation as described in   the report in order to progress the preferred option.

(Min.   No. C3394 refers)

Completed

Min. No. 553 – 2nd   Quarter Scrutiny Decision Tracking of Recommendations and Updated Work   Programme Schedule 2016/17 (MD) – Recommended

(2)   That the Work Programme schedule be   amended as detailed in the minutes and uploaded onto the Council’s website.

[The   Director of Social Services Annual Report 2016/17;

Update on   how the Council is managing increased demand for Family Support Services;

Integrated   Family Support Service Annual Report;

Vale of Glamorgan   Fostering Service.]

 

 

 

 

Work   programme schedule updated and uploaded to the Council’s website.

Completed

08 December 2016

Min. No. 592 – Leisure   Management Contract – Year 4 Report (DEH) – Recommended

(2)   That the Year 5 Annual Report be presented   to the Scrutiny Committee in 2017.

 

 

 

Added   to work programme schedule.

Completed

Min. No. 593 – Request   for Consideration of Matter (Councillor R.J. Bertin) Food Safety   Interventions – Recommended

(2)   That the Committee continues to receive   regular updates in relation to the performance of the Food Service.

 

 

 

Added   to work programme schedule.

Completed

Min. No. 594 – Initial   Revenue Budget Proposals 2017/18 (DSS) – Recommended

(2)   That the Corporate Performance and   Resources Scrutiny Committee be made aware that it is the view of this   Committee that all the cost pressures detailed in Appendix 3 should be fully   funded.

 

 

Corporate   Performance and Resources Scrutiny Committee advised of the Committee’s   views.

Completed

Min. No. 596 – Reshaping   Services – Review of Meals on Wheels Service (REF) – Recommended

(3)   That   the views of the Committee, as outlined in the minutes, be referred to   Cabinet for its consideration.

 

 

 

Comments   included in a report for discussion at the Cabinet meeting on 9th January,   2017.

Cabinet,   on 9th January, 2017 resolved

[1]   That the contents of the report and the   minutes of the Scrutiny Committee (Healthy Living and Social Care) meeting on   8 December, 2016 (attached at Appendix B to the report) be noted.

[2]   That the preferred option as outlined in   the report, which was to cease to provide the Council’s internal Meals on   Wheels service and signpost to alternatives, including a new Social   Enterprise be endorsed.

[3]   That delegated authority be granted to the   Director of Social Services in consultation with the Leader, Cabinet Member for   Housing and Social Care, the Managing Director and Head of Adult Services to   undertake and conclude all necessary actions, including staff consultation,   as described in the report in order to implement the preferred option.

(Min   No C3415 refers)

Completed

 

(2)       T H A T the updated work programme shown at Appendix B be approved, uploaded to the Council’s website and be an agenda item at the next Committee meeting.

 

(3)       T H A T the compendium of Committee reports / topics attached at Appendix C be noted.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To maintain effective tracking of the Committee’s recommendations.

 

(2)       For information.

 

(3)       To provide a summary of the outcomes of reports / agenda items considered by the Scrutiny Committee.

 

 

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