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Agenda Item No.

 

CABINET

 

Minutes of a meeting held on 8 September 2014

 

Present: Councillor S.C. Egan (Chairman); Councillors: B.E. Brooks, L. Burnett, R. Curtis, C.P.J. Elmore and G. John.

 

Apologies: Councillor N. Moore

 

                                                    

C2440                        MINUTES –

 

REOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the meeting held on 11 August, 2014 be approved as a correct record.

 

C2441            DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST –

 

The following declarations of interest were received

 

Councillor B.E. Brooks.

Agenda Item No 8 - Request For Consideration From Barry Town Council – The Williams Commission Report.

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Member of Barry Town Council.

 

Agenda Item No. 14 - The Strategic Appointment of Local Education Authority School Governors In The Vale of Glamorgan Schools

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at St. Helens R C Infants School and Jenner Park Primary School. As an LEA Governor, her personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore she was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Agenda Item No. 16 - The Revised Policy For The Appointment Of Local Authority School Governors

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at St. Helens R C Infants School and Jenner Park Primary School. As an LEA Governor, her personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore she was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Councillor L. Burnett.

Agenda Item No 7 - Request For Consideration From Penarth Town Council  – The Localism Act

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Member of Penarth Town Council.

 

Agenda Item No. 14 - The Strategic Appointment of Local Education Authority School Governors In The Vale of Glamorgan Schools

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at St. Cyres Comprehensive School. As an LEA Governor, her personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore she was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Agenda Item No. 16 - The Revised Policy For The Appointment Of Local Authority School Governors

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at St. Cyres Comprehensive School. As an LEA Governor, her personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore she was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Councillor R. Curtis.

Agenda Item No 8 -  Request For Consideration From Barry Town Council – The Williams Commission Report.

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Member of Barry Town Council.

 

Agenda Item No. 14 - The Strategic Appointment of Local Education Authority School Governors In The Vale of Glamorgan Schools

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at Oakfield Primary School. As an LEA Governor, his personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore he was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

 

Agenda Item No. 16 - The Revised Policy For The Appointment Of Local Authority School Governors

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at Oakfield Primary School. As an LEA Governor, his personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore he was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Councillor C.P.J. Elmore.

Agenda Item No. 14 - The Strategic Appointment of Local Education Authority School Governors In The Vale of Glamorgan Schools

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at Barry Comprehensive School. and Holton Road Primary School. As an LEA Governor, his personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore he was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Agenda Item No. 16 - The Revised Policy For The Appointment Of Local Authority School Governors

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at Barry Comprehensive School and Holton Primary School. As an LEA Governor, his personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore he was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Councillor G. John.

Agenda Item No. 14 - The Strategic Appointment of Local Education Authority School Governors In The Vale of Glamorgan Schools

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at Llantwit Major Comprehensive School. As an LEA Governor, his personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore he was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Agenda Item No. 16 - The Revised Policy For The Appointment Of Local Authority School Governors

 

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at Llantwit Major Comprehensive School. As an LEA Governor, his personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore he was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Councillor S Egan

Agenda Item No 8 - Request For Consideration From Barry Town Council – The Williams Commission Report.

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Member of Barry Town Council.

 

Agenda Item No.14 - The Strategic Appointment of Local Education Authority School Governors In The Vale of Glamorgan Schools

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at High Street Primary School.  As an LEA Governor, his personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore he was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Agenda Item No. 16 - The Revised Policy For The Appointment Of Local Authority School Governors

 

Reason for Declaration –

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at High Street Primary School. As an LEA Governor, his personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore he was able to speak and vote on the matter. 

 

 

 

C2442                        CARDIFF BAY ADVISORY COMMITTEE –

 

The minutes of the Cardiff Bay Advisory Committee meeting held on 4 June, 2014 were submitted                

 

Present: 

 

Ms. C. Dimond          Cardiff Flood Action Committee

Councillor B. Derbyshire    Cardiff Council

Mr. J. Harrison          Natural Resources Wales

Councillor G. Roberts         Penarth Town Council

Mr. C. Atherton         Waterfront Partners.

 

Also present:

 

Mr. J. Maidment        Cardiff Harbour Authority

Mr. A. Vye-Parminter           Cardiff Harbour Authority

Mr. C. Hope   Vale of Glamorgan Council

 

(a)       Apologies for Absence -

 

These were received from Councillor L. Burnett (Vale of Glamorgan Council), Mr. C. Michael (RSPB), Ms. S. Newbold (British Marine Federation and Royal Yachting Association) and Mr. M. Chidlow (Associated British Ports).

 

(b)       Appointment of Chairman -

 

AGREED - T H A T Councillor L. Burnett be appointed Chairman for the ensuing Municipal Year.

 

(c)        Appointment of Vice-Chairman -

 

AGREED - T H A T Mrs. C. Dimond be appointed Vice-Chairman for the ensuing Municipal Year.

 

In the unavoidable absence of the Chairman, Mrs. Dimond took the Chair.

 

(d)       Minutes -

 

AGREED - T H A T the minutes of the meeting held on 12th March, 2014 be approved as a correct record.

 

(e)       Timetable of Meetings -

 

The report suggested dates for future meetings of the Committee as detailed below:

 

DATE VENUE

Wednesday, 17th September, 2014 at 5.15 p.m.            Cardiff International White Water

Wednesday, 19th November, 2014 at 5.15 p.m. Ditto

Wednesday, 14th January, 2015 at 5.15 p.m.    Ditto

Thursday, 5th March, 2015 at 5.15 p.m.   Ditto

Wednesday, 3rd June, 2015 at 5.15 p.m. (Annual Meeting)    Ditto

 

AGREED - T H A T the Timetable of Meetings as detailed above be approved.

 

(f)        Navigational Safety -

 

It was reported that:

 

•           the dredging of the River Taff adjacent to the Water Bus Stop opposite Cardiff Castle had been completed

•           the annual maintenance inspection of the water buoys had been completed

•           repairs to the bridge over the River Ely were ongoing (replacement bearings).  It was anticipated that the works would be completed by the end of June.

 

Mrs. Dimond observed that she had noticed a lot of reed growth beyond the Pumping Station and enquired if this would impede boats. 

 

The Committee were advised that this had been noticed and that a survey was to be undertaken to measure how fast the reed was growing.  At present, the reeds did not impede boat travel.

 

(g)       Progress Report - Mr. J. Maidment - Cardiff Harbour Authority -

 

Mr. Maidment advised of maintenance work being undertaken, including works to the Fish Pass. 

 

Problems had occurred with the Pont y Werin Bridge - a failure had occurred the previous week, and attempts were being made to rectify the problem. 

 

(h)       Update Report - Mr. J. Harrison - Natural Resources Wales -

 

Mr. Harrison advised that 24th May was World Fish Migration Day and that Natural Resources Wales had tried to promote awareness with colleagues in CHA by setting up a display on the Barrage.  Unfortunately, the weather was extremely wet which meant that there were far less people around as would normally be on a Saturday.

 

On a related matter, Mr. Harrison advised that Natural Resources Wales was reviewing its approach to fish management in respect of fish hatcheries.  Colleagues have been working with the Harbour Authority to improve the natural process to increase the return of migratory fish and reduce the reliance on restocking with fish from NRW’s hatcheries e.g. works to renew the weir and fish pass at Blackweir in Cardiff.

 

On another initiative by Cardiff Council Radyr Weir a hydro-power scheme is being developed which would include a new fish pass.

 

Furthermore, Natural Resources Wales was aware of invasive species affecting the natural habitat and Natural Resources Wales was looking into ways that they could be controlled.  Consideration was being given to submitting a bid to the Assembly’s Nature Fund to link up with other organisations to see how the species could be managed.  This supports the continued need for a proactive approach to the management of the Bay.

 

There was a need for a proactive approach to the management of the Bay.

 

Mr. Harrison spoke of a number of ongoing issues, namely:

 

           a minor pollution incident in the Graving Dock

           a minor pollution incident in Penarth Marina.

 

Mrs. Dimond enquired if the number of salmon returning to the Bay was increasing and Mr. Harrison replied that generally speaking, in Europe, migration was at a critical level but the figures for the Bay area were encouraging. 

 

Councillor Roberts referred to an incident of Japanese Knotweed in Penarth Marina and asked if this would affect the Cardiff Bay area.

 

Mr. Maidment stated that he would look into this.

 

(i)         Information Reports -

 

Committee were presented with the following reports which had been presented to the Executive of Cardiff Council:

 

           Saving the Coal Exchange - meeting held on 29th January, 2014

           Cardiff Region Metro Proposals: Strategic Implications for Cardiff - Executive, 21st February, 2014.

 

AGREED - T H A T the contents of the reports be noted.

 

(j)         Ground Water Complaints -

 

Mrs. Dimond reminded the Committee that the deadline for the making of complaints to the Independent Groundwater Complaints Administrator expired in 2019.  

 

Mr. Maidment advised that the Harbour Authority was looking to advertise this fact.

 

(k)        Any Other Business -

 

Mr. Atherton enquired as to how the NATO Conference would affect the Bay area and was advised that there would be impacts but at this time, the details were not known.

 

(l)         Date of Next Meeting -

 

AGREED - T H A T the next meeting be held on Wednesday, 17th September, 2014 at 5.15 p.m. in the Cardiff International White Water.

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the Cardiff Bay Advisory Committee meeting held on 4 June, 2014 be noted.

 

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C2443                        VALE OF GLAMORGAN LOCAL ACCESS FORUM –

 

The minutes of the Vale of Glamorgan Local Access Forum meeting held on 15 July, 2014 were submitted

 

Present:  Mr. F. Coleman (Chairman), Mrs. V.M. Hartrey, Mr. J. Herbert, Mr. H.S. McMillan, Mr. M. Dunn, Ms. E. Nash, Mr. R. Simpson and Councillor E. Williams.

 

Also present: Mr. J. Wyatt, Mrs. L. Mills, Mr. G. Teague, Mrs. S. Thomas and Ms. C. Cameron (Vale of Glamorgan Council).

 

(a)       Apologies for Absence -

 

These were received from Mr. S. Lait, Mr. M. Parry, Mr. R. Pittard, Mr. R. Traherne and Ms. S. Tindall (Natural Resources Wales).

 

(b)       Minutes -

 

AGREED - T H A T the minutes of the meeting held on 5th February, 2014 be accepted as a correct record.

 

As agreed at the meeting of the Forum on 5th February, 2014, Ms. Clare Cameron, Principal Transport Safety Officer had been invited to provide an update with regard to the Active Travel Programme.  Ms. Cameron informed the Forum that a response to the Welsh Government consultation on the design guidance and statutory guidance for the delivery of the Active Travel (Wales) Act 2013 needed to be formulated by 4th August, 2014.  A report would be going to Cabinet on 28th July with regard to the consultation’s response.  The consultation document from Welsh Government provided design guidance and delivery guidance and the Forum was informed that Welsh Government wanted a quick turnaround for implementation in Autumn 2014. 

 

Members were informed that the Vale of Glamorgan Council would have a duty with regard to education, highway development and public rights of way and that the guidance would be all encompassing, not just with regard to transportation.

 

Ms. Cameron informed the Forum that the Authority would need to look at the recommended measures in detail and consider how it would enforce this guidance on developers.  There would be implications for future planning developments as there would be a legal duty to take this guidance into consideration as part of the planning process.  The Authority had one year to develop an Active Travel map, for which it had received some funding; existing and proposed routes needed to be detailed on the map and all routes would need to be audited. 

 

Criticisms of the guidance included the view that it related more to urban rather than rural areas; too much detail was required within the timescale, which included street lighting, street furniture, location of dropped kerbs, shops, etc. Ms. Cameron confirmed that the Authority would be able to make representations within the consultation document with regards to these issues. 

 

The Authority would need to identify Active Travel routes throughout the Vale of Glamorgan and implement infrastructures on these routes for both walking and cycling traffic with a view to channelling traffic onto these routes.  Furthermore, the Authority would need to upgrade the Active Travel routes to a high standard with Sustrans recommending upgrading the most direct routes. 

 

Ms. Cameron informed the Forum that some mapping had already been carried out as part of the Local Development Plan (LDP), yet these had not been audited, and they were also looking to include distances on the maps.  The Authority had three years to implement the Active Travel routes; however, there was the possibility that there might not be any of these routes within the Vale of Glamorgan.  No baseline data was currently available from the Welsh Government and there were concerns with regards to the deadline as they required quality data in order to commence the monitoring and evaluation of the Active Travel routes.  The authority did not want the countdown to start until they had received compatible data from Welsh Government.

 

Following a question, the Forum was informed that other local authorities also had concerns with regards to the high level of data involved and the amount of resources needed to deliver the requirements of the Active Travel (Wales) Act 2013 within the prescribed timescales.  Ms Cameron advised that they may only pick six routes and the Authority would need to justify why they had not chosen certain routes.  The focus of the first two years may well be on Barry and subsequently expand to the other areas in the Vale of Glamorgan. 

 

Mr. Simpson queried whether once an Active Travel route had been identified, the Authority would need to identify and implement improvements for this route.  In response, Ms. Cameron advised that this was the case; however, the Authority could request funding for this work yet this would be dependent on the identification of works required.  Another criticism of the guidance was that it was geared towards cyclists rather than walkers and the Active Travel routes had different criteria to the Safe Walking Routes to Schools Guidance.  Collaboration with other authorities with regard to the consultation document would also be taken into account in the submission.

 

In response to a query regarding whether routes for the elderly and disabled would be taken into account, Ms. Cameron informed the Forum that individuals could also put forward their own representations via the Vale of Glamorgan website.

 

Following a query from Mr. McMillan, it was confirmed that any candidate routes selected would need to be within the settlement boundary Welsh Government had chosen in order to meet the set criteria, in this case, within an urban area.  Welsh Government had stipulated that bids could not be put forward unless land issues had been resolved.

 

Ms. Cameron informed the Forum that there were not a lot of cycle routes in the Vale of Glamorgan and that there had been a shift to a more urban focus geared towards commuting rather than leisure travel.

 

The Chairman requested whether the Secretary could circulate the report once it had been to Cabinet and was informed that this could be arranged

 

In reference to the minutes from the last meeting, Mr. Teague informed the Forum that the Steering Group on Promoting Walking in the Rural Vale had recently met and that the proposals for way-marking had been discussed.  The identified walks would be tested and this was possibly something that the Forum could assist with as a quick turnaround was required.  The documents currently only existed in hard copy; however, the Group was looking at constructing a website to serve as a ‘One Stop Shop’ which would be hosted by the Tourism Department.

 

The Chairman asked how many routes were accessible for the disabled and was informed that currently only 6 gold routes existed, which were mainly coastal with a couple being inland and only one was accessible to wheelchairs. 

 

Mr. McMillan reconfirmed that members of the Local Access Forum were able to assist the Public Rights of Way Team with route repairs, feedback etc., and was informed by Mr. Teague that whilst the Public Rights of Way team facilitated volunteer schemes in partnership with Valeways, such as adopt a path and work parties, co-ordination of volunteers outside of particular programmes was not run directly by Rights of Way at present.  He further informed the Forum that, in order for a volunteer scheme to be effective, there needed to be a co-ordinated approach.  Risk assessment reviews, including providing for volunteer services, were ongoing as well as a review of the Countryside Service.  It was noted that volunteering was currently taking place within the wider countryside service and it was anticipated that volunteers would be supported to a greater degree as a result of the restructure.

 

Further discussion took place with regards to volunteers and possible assistance with regards to maintenance issues etc., Mr. Teague informed the Forum that they could reassess the situation with regards to direct support of volunteers after the restructure of the Countryside Service, however, at this point volunteering to address practical works was delivered through schemes in partnership with other organisations only. 

 

The Forum was informed that there was a requirement to send hard copies of the Definitive Map to all Town and Community Councils, Ordnance Survey and that a further copy would be kept on deposit in the Record Offices.  Mr. Simpson asked whether hard copies were distributed every time there was a revision to the map and it was confirmed that this was not the case and that any revisions made by Modification Orders would have to be read in conjunction with the Definitive Map held by the Public Rights of Way Team.  Mr. Teague confirmed that they were hoping to publish the Definitive Map in Autumn 2014 and were currently acquiring quotations for publication.

 

Mrs. Hartrey asked whether all new routes would need to be accessible to wheelchairs and cyclists and it was confirmed that this was unlikely to be the case, particularly for wheelchair access and that the appropriateness of traffic and the connections beyond would dictate whether wheelchair access would be required, for example, at Gileston the path led to fields, with stiles and a shingle beach. Furthermore, the Highways Act test stipulated that new or revised routes had to be no less convenient to use than the previous route and there were some DDA requirements within guidance produced by DEFRA.

 

The Chairman informed the Forum that they had experienced a very informative walk around Millbrook Road in Dinas Powys prior to the Forum meeting which had highlighted land ownership problems, which they had been previously unaware of.

 

The Chairman, in referring to the NRW review of Local Access Forum Working Practices, referred to there being a report to the forthcoming Local Access Forum Conference on 30th July, 2014.  He would be attending and, as neither the Vice-Chairman nor Secretary were able to do so, has asked that any other Members wishing to deputise inform him accordingly.

 

(c)        Modification and Legal Orders Update:

 

The Forum received a report detailing the latest Legal Orders received since January 2014, along with Modification Orders progress. 

 

The Chairman extended his commendations to the Public Rights of Way Team with regard to progress made with Legal Orders and Modification Orders, particularly with regard to Footpath No. 52, the Diversion of Lavernock No. 5.  Mrs. Thomas confirmed that copies of the latest maps and orders were available for the Forum to view after the meeting. 

 

The Chairman confirmed that many of Legal Orders had been financed by the Rural Development Plan (RDP) and it highlighted where priorities were falling. 

 

(d)       Maintenance Update -

 

The Forum received a report which detailed the number of issues logged since 23rd January, 2014, the number of issues resolved since 27th January, 2011 and the number of unresolved issues since 27th January, 2011.  It was confirmed that the report was cumulative and as such, the issues logged since 23rd January, 2014 were included within the issues resolved and unresolved since 27th January, 2011.

 

It was confirmed that feedback from the April 2014 Public Rights of Way surveys had been included within the maintenance of Public Rights of Ways graph and had not had a great impact on the figures. The first half of the year was on target, with the number of issues resolved being approximately 65%.

 

Following a query, Mr. Teague informed the Forum that Rights of Way Database was initially populated as the result of a 100% Condition Survey completed in early 2011 and has been maintained since.  The database has enabled the Council to better group and target outstanding issues such as by tendering for large contracts such as a recent one aimed at stile steps repairs.  He further informed the Forum that they would be contacting the individual Town and Community Councils with regards to signage; as they had powers to decide whether to remove signage or not sign post certain paths.  Mrs. Thomas informed the Forum that the feedback from the surveys was very valuable and had been fed straight into the maintenance log system. 

 

(e)       Rights of Way Improvement Plan (ROWIP) Update -

 

The Forum received a report detailing the draft work programme for 2014-15 as follows:

 

Project Heading       ROWIP Action Point

 

Preparation of new Definitive Map, analysis and reports of CAMS data

           

           1 - Completed a review of the Definitive Map

           2 - Improve the procedures for keeping the Definitive Map up to date

           9 - Full implementation of Countryside and Access Management System

(CAMS) for ongoing maintenance management

           30 - Extend partnership working with neighbouring Authorities in particular with regard to cross-border routes

 

Creation & Improvement of PROW links between communities and within Coastal Zones to the WCP, including ecological survey and biodiversity interpretations where necessary      

 

           25 - Work with equestrian groups to investigate a more coherent network of suitable routes, including potential upgrading of existing routes to bridleway status

           28 - Work with landowners and occupiers to investigate a more coherent network of routes especially for horse riders (see Action Idea 25)

           29 - Improve partnership working with Community Councils to include       investigating path stewardship, community route maps and information boards

Improve of path surface through wildlife trust to Coast Path  

           13 - Catalogue and prioritise improvements to coastal path and coastal access routes including surfacing, signage and fencing

           5 - Take opportunities to improve PROW network through conditions or obligations on planning applications associated with development proposals

Review and Support of annual clearance arrangements       

           10 - Carry out an annual clearance programme for priority routes and review the programme annually

Establish focus group including Communities First and Health Agenda reps to    develop and deliver improvements for Low Use groups         

           20 - Implement least restrictive access policy for all future maintenance or improvement works following WAG guidance

           23 - Establish a reference group to advise on opportunities to upgrade the network for people with disabilities and less mobile users and implementation of WAG guidance.

 

It was confirmed that the ROWIP Grant had been extended for another year for 2014-15 and conditions in the new offer of funding were slightly less onerous than previous years, with direct requirements to provide specific categories of projects being removed. 

 

The Chairman asked whether the Focus Group included members who were less able-bodied and in response Mr. Teague advised that they were working with the Communities First programme.  However, it covered very urban areas and, therefore, they would have to wait and see how these parts of the project progressed.

 

(f)        Coastal Access Improvement Programme (CAIP) Update:

 

The Forum received a report which detailed the progress on the Coastal Access projects listed below.  It was confirmed that the Council had engaged with Natural Resources Wales along with Cardiff, Newport and Monmouthshire Council Councils to facilitate the delivery of coastal work on a regional basis.

 

A Regional Coastal Access Officer had been recruited by Natural Resources Wales and was being hosted in the Vale of Glamorgan with accommodation costs being set against projects as match-funding.  It was confirmed that the new officer was Tricia Cottnam, who had previously conducted coastal work on behalf of the Vale of Glamorgan Council.

 

 

70% Path works       VG103            Llantwit Beach - Legal Diversion onto walked route

            VG104            Cwm Colhuw - Surface improvements

            VG015            Gilestone - Diversion Order and ground works

            VG106            Rhoose Point - Surface improvements

            VG107            Little Island & Nell’s Point/Barry Island - Legal creation

            VG108            Sully - Move stone stiles to safer location

            VG110            Bay Caravan Park - Legal diversion onto walked line

            VG204            Porthkerry bulwalks surface improvements

 

70% Path works total                      

100% Path works     VG101            Ogmore - Construction of Off Road Route

SD - Storm damage works  VG201SD      Monknash - set back of bridge/culvert following storms

 

            VG202SD      West of Summerhouse - rollback following cliff fall

            VG203SD      East of Summerhouse - rollback of path from clifftop.

 

Mr. Teague confirmed that he had met with the three participating Local Authorities with a view to driving the programme forward.  It was further confirmed that Tricia Cottnam’s workload was directed by a Steering Group in conjunction with Natural Resources Wales and her time would be spread across the Local Authorities involved in the Steering Group.  Projects would be front-loaded in Monmouthshire for the next few months, following which she would move over to the Vale of Glamorgan.   It was confirmed that this post was directly funded by Natural Resources Wales.

 

(g)       Rural Development Plan Projects Update -

 

Mr. Teague informed the Forum that the largest project was currently the bridleways project in the Penllyn Estate, the deadline for which was September 2014.  They were currently going out to tender and it was confirmed that the landowner was in agreement with the proposals.  The project would mean a 40% increase in bridleways across the Vale of Glamorgan and would result in approximately an additional 12kms of bridleways.

 

Mr. Teague confirmed that they were currently awaiting the order for Cross Common, the contracts were in place and work would begin shortly.  He confirmed that the path at The Herbert’s had been well received and was a safer route to the school. 

 

The Chairman advised that consideration would be given to viewing the Penllyn Bridleway Works Project in conjunction with the next meeting of the Forum.

 

(h)       Consultation on Changes to Cross Compliance from 2015 -

 

A short summary paper on Cross Compliance Consultation was circulated at the meeting.  The Welsh Government had released a consultation document for consideration of particulars to be included in forthcoming Cross Compliance arrangements for the Single Payment Scheme (known as Direct Payments in 2015) and for Rural Development Payment Support. 

 

The consultation included a specific question as to whether to allow Cross Compliance to be expanded to include certain aspects of Public Rights of Way management.  The proposals were broader than, and should be distinguished from, the elements of the higher level Glastir scheme upon which the LAF had previously been consulted. 

 

Landowners and occupiers had a number of statutory responsibilities relating to public rights of way, including the provision and maintenance of furniture (gates and stiles) and keeping paths free from overhanging vegetation.

 

In England public rights of way were currently included under cross compliance and were subject to the requirements to keep land in Good Agricultural and Environmental Condition (GAEC8).  To date Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland had not included public rights of way in their respective cross compliance regimes.

 

The Welsh Government was looking at ways to modernise and simplify legislation on public rights of way for the benefit of landowners, users and local authorities.  One of the areas it was considering for the future was the digitisation of the definitive maps.  Every local authority had digitised working copies of the maps but the statutory definitive maps remained in hard copy format.  A requirement to standardise maps to a regulated electronic format should provide more consistent up to date information for public use of paths across Wales. 

 

In the future, once this was achieved, the Welsh Government would consider including maintenance of Public Rights of Way under cross compliance in Wales.

 

Local authorities had primary responsibility for the maintenance of paths and for ensuring that they remain unobstructed.  They worked closely with landowners and occupiers to safeguard access on public paths in their areas.

 

The public expected that rights of way were properly protected and maintained and that land managers fulfilled their statutory obligations in this area.  Including Public Rights of Way in cross compliance would support local authorities in their enforcement role and make a link to farmers’ wider land management responsibilities and, where relevant, the public funding they received.

 

The Forum was requested to specifically consider a response to question 12 of the consultation document, which requested their views on the above potential approach to future developments in relation to Public Rights of Way. The Forum was also provided with discussion topics and content in relation to this question, which covered the digitisation of the Definitive Map, maintenance of public rights of way and existing enforcement arrangements.

 

The draft response from Bridgend County Borough Council was tabled at the meeting.  Mr. Teague informed the Forum that there were three main areas that should be addressed in the Vale of Glamorgan’s response to question 12 of the consultation.  These were the digitisation of the Definitive Map, landowners’ responsibility to maintain structures on their land, and the effect that the inclusion of maintenance would have on the payment/grants, for example, the cost of kissing gates.  Mr. Teague also stated that there were concerns with regards to how the approach to cross compliance would affect the maintenance of public rights of way and enforcement issues.

 

Mr. McMillan asked whether one landowner could sign up to cross compliance but others not and in response Mr. Teague stated that, as cross compliance was linked to basic grants, most farms would be within the scheme in some way or another and there would also be a register which was probably quite detailed.  Mr. McMillan also asked whether the Public Rights of Way Team would need access to the register and Mr. Teague informed him that the Rural Payments Agency visited farms and made arrangements between the farms and the Inspectorate with regard to cross compliance.  He further informed the Forum that the team could take enforcement action against landowners; however stopping their grants was a more powerful tool. 

Mr. Dunn stated that local authorities would not get involved in this type of action, a sample of farms would be inspected on behalf of the European Commission and if breaches were discovered a percentage of the payments would be withheld.

 

The Chairman expressed the view that there were also issues around standardisation.  In response, Mr. Teague stated that this could be included within the consultation response and confirmed that there were British standards with regard to public rights of way furniture and there was a statutory duty on landowners to maintain the landscape, footpaths and furniture on their land. 

 

Following discussion of the draft response from Bridgend County Borough Council, views were expressed to support this response.  Mr. Teague stated that the Vale of Glamorgan Council had a good Digitised Map which had been formulated over the last two to three years which had been quality checked and confirmed that the production of a Definitive Digitised Map would require a change in law.  Mr. Teague stated that one of the benefits of a Digitised Working Map was that changes due to amending orders could be incorporated immediately into it and also considered how the Definitive Map would interact with cross compliance issues. 

 

Following discussion of the Welsh Government Draft Compliance Proposals, it was agreed that the Secretary would formulate and submit a response to the Consultation for the Vale of Glamorgan Local Access Forum based on their discussions which would address the issues of the maintenance of public rights of way, enforcement arrangements and the digitisation of the Definitive Map.

 

(i)         Written Statement by the Welsh Government on Access and Outdoor Recreation -

 

The Forum received a statement from Welsh Government on Access and Outdoor Recreation from John Griffiths, AM, Minister for Culture and Sport.

 

The Chairman expressed a view that the Local Access Forum would be interested in getting involved with the updated guidance on the Rights of Way Improvement Plan (ROWIP). 

 

Mr. Dunn expressed the view that the statement was quite positive and was encouraged that the Rights of Way Improvement Plan (ROWIP) was still in place at 2017, however, was disappointed that there was no plan to pursue primary legislation in this Assembly term. 

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the Vale of Glamorgan Local Access Forum meeting held on 15 July, 2014 be noted.

 

C2444                        CORPORATE PARENTING PANEL –

 

The minutes of the Corporate Parenting Panel meeting held on 3 February, 2014 were submitted

 

Present: Councillor S. Egan (Chairman), Councillor R. Bertin, Councillor E Williams, Councillor V Hartrey., Rachael Evans (Head of Children & Young People Services), C. Limbrick (Operational Manager), Martine Coles (LAC Education Coordinator)

 

(1)       Apologies for absence       

 

1.1       Councillor C Elmore, Councillor R Traherne, J. Smith (Safeguarding Officer), L. Jones (Head of Achievement - Learning and Skills), P. Evans (Director of Social and Care Services

           

(2)       Minutes and Matters Arising 18 October 2013  

 

The minutes of 18 October 2013 meeting were agreed as a correct record.

           

 (3)      Allegations Against Professionals – Colette Limbrick 

 

Colette Limbrick presented a paper titled Allegations Against Professionals to the panel. The paper was attached at appendix A to the minutes.

           

(4)       Personal Education Plans – Martine Coles       

 

Martine Coles presented her report on how the Looked After Children Education Team supported Looked after Children through the use of Personal Education Plans (PEP).

 

The PEP was an individual, needs led, education plan which focused on the action that was required for the child to fulfill their potential.  It was a working document that planed, sets targets and acted as a record of progress and achievement.  It was a school and education based record and an important source of continuity for the child, the parent and the carer.  The PEP covered the requirements identified in Towards a Stable Life and a Brighter Future (June 2007).

 

This data was used to monitor attainment and challenge underachievement. It informed what additional support was appropriate to improve the child’s learning. The data identified children who were more able and talented, underachieving or on track in their learning.

 

Further detail was outlined in the report that was attached at Appendix b along with a sample of a Personal Education Plan attached at Appendix c to the minutes.

           

(5)       Any Other Business           

           

Councillor R Bertin suggested that a forward work programme could be used to outline specific areas of work and future discussions for the Panel.

 

It was agreed that this would be discussed at the next meeting.

           

(6)       Next Meeting Dates 2014  

           

Monday 19th May 2014 at 5pm Cabinet Meeting Room

 

Monday 15th September 2014 at 5pm Cabinet Meeting Room

 

Monday 15th December 2014 at 5pm Cabinet Meeting Room

           

RESOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the Corporate Parenting Panel meeting  held on 3 February, 2014 be noted.

 

C2445                        REQUEST FOR CONSIDERATION FROM PENARTH TOWN COUNCIL – THE LOCALISM ACT –

 

The Community Liaison Committee on 8 July, 2014 considered the above report from the Head of Democratic Services.

 

The Committee received a report with regard to the provisions of the Localism Act as it relates to Wales. 

 

The Localism Bill was introduced in the House of Commons on 13th December, 2010.  Attached to the report at Appendix A was a paper prepared in January 2011 by the Members' Research Service of the National Assembly for Wales.  The purpose of the paper was to provide a guide to Welsh-related provisions in the Bill.

 

The Act received Royal Assent on 15th November 2011.  Many of the provisions of the Act do not apply in Wales.  However, as set out in the Appendix to the report, the Act gives the National Assembly for Wales legislative competence in respect of three matters:

 

 

           Local referendums on proposed Council Tax levels

           Planning applications and enforcement

           The Housing Revenue Account (HRA) and Housing Revenue Account Subsidy (HRAS) system in Wales.

 

The Act also contained two Wales-only provisions conferring a power for Welsh Ministers to decide the timing of Council Tax revaluations in Wales and the power for Assembly Ministers to give directions to Welsh Local Authorities who fail to produce new budget calculations after having their Council Tax capped. 

 

A number of provisions applied to both Wales and England, these include:

 

           Ensuring that Councillors are not prevented from taking part in decisions where they have expressed a view on related issues ("predetermination")

           Requiring Local Authorities to publish Senior Pay Policy Statements

           Repealing duties for Local Authorities to promote understanding of local democracy and make schemes for handling petitions

           Requiring ballots on all proposals for Business Rate Supplements and enabling Local Authorities to give discretionary business rate discounts

           Changing the way local housing authorities may discharge the main homelessness duty under the Housing Act 1986.

 

At the time of the Bill, certain provisions required a Legislative Consent Motion (LCM) in the National Assembly.  These included the Local Authority pay accountability provisions, the repeals relating to local democracy and petitions and the homelessness provisions.  Further explanatory text regarding the clauses which were relevant to Wales were set out in sections 2-4 of the Appendix to the report.

 

The Member from Penarth Town Council stated that in England the Localism Act impacted on rights such as future procedures for planning and also Pre-Scrutiny and Scrutiny Committees in relation to planning functions, this report highlighted certain aspects and information contained within the Localism Act with regard to pre-determination, planning and the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) all of which he felt were very important.  He thanked officers for the report and for highlighting the aspects that related to Wales.

 

During the discussion the Chairman took the opportunity to thank the Town and Community Councils who had made requests for consideration for matters to be debated by the Committee stating that the Community Liaison Committee provided a forum for Town and Community Councils to debate such issues and that they had several issues in line for future meetings.  A Member queried whether the phrase “hand back†contained within 3.3 of Appendix A was the same as “claw back†in respect of the Housing Revenue account with the Democratic Services Officer advising that they would contact the appropriate officer and respond to the member accordingly. 

 

A Member of the Vale of Glamorgan Council asked whether there was an update on third party speaking rights at Planning Committee with the Chairman responding that  a meeting of the Constitution Working Party was to be held on 17th July 2014 and that the Constitution was being reviewed in depth.  He was not able to provide any further information on the issue but hoped that he would be able to do so in time for the next meeting of the Committee in October but that he would also raise the issue with the responsible Cabinet Member.

 

Following consideration of the report by the Committee, it was subsequently

 

AGREED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the report on the Localism Act be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T Cabinet be requested to address the issue of third party speaking rights at Planning Committee as a matter of urgency..

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To apprise the Committee of the provisions of the Localism Act with regard to Wales and to Town and Community Councils.

 

(2)       To progress further discussion on the issue of third party speaking rights.

 

----------------------------------------------

 

 

During consideration of this matter, the Cabinet Member for Regeneration, Innovation, Planning and Transportation left the room and took no part in any discussions that took place.

 

Cabinet having considered the recommendations from the Community Liaison Committee

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T it be noted that the issue of third party speaking rights at Planning Committee was currently being considered as part of the review of the Council’s Constitution.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note the contents of the report.

 

(2)       To review the issue of third party speaking rights at Planning Committee.

 

C2446                        REQUEST FOR CONSIDERATION FROM BARRY TOWN COUNCIL – THE WILLIAMS COMMISSION REPORT -

 

The Community Liaison Committee on 8 July, 2014 considered the above report of the Managing Director

 

Barry Town Council had requested  in a letter dated 14th April 2014, a copy of which  was attached to the report at Appendix A, that the item be placed on an agenda for the next meeting of the Community Liaison Committee.

 

The Williams Commission on Public Governance and Delivery was set up by Welsh Government and reported in January 2014, making a number of recommendations.  Among those recommendations was that Town and Community Councils should be merged to form larger authorities (as was also recommended for Unitary Councils).  Since January 2014 the report has been the subject of discussion within political parties in Wales, but Welsh Government had not formally responded to it.  It was understood that Welsh Government would shortly be setting out its response and issuing a White Paper on changes to be made to local government.  Until this response was published the report had no formal status and remained simply the views of the Commission

 

The Member for Barry Town Council expressed concern with regard to statements that had been made by Welsh Government in response to the Williams Commission report before their official response, and to the fact that Town and Community Councils had not been consulted on the report.  The Member stated that it was clear that the report specified that 22 local authorities were unacceptable and that there would be definite implications for Town and Community Councils.  This would also therefore have implications for the Charter between the Vale of Glamorgan Council and the Town and Community Councils within the Vale.  The Member queried what would happen with the Charter and expressed concern about the future of joint working and the impact on the provision of direct services to the public.  The Head of Improvement and Development agreed that the Williams Commission report would have significant implications if its recommendations were made statutory; however Welsh Government’s intentions were not yet known and therefore the Vale of Glamorgan Council was unable to formulate a programme of actions at present. 

 

Another Member from Barry Town Council further stated that they felt there had been a missed opportunity in that Town and Community Councils across the Vale had not been asked for their input into the Williams Commission report and that their views should have been requested. This was duly accepted by both Vale Council members and Town and Community Council members.  The report had also highlighted that more responsibilities should be given to Town and Community Councils with some Members commenting that some responsibilities may be difficult for smaller community councils to take on.  There was also the view that Town and Community Council’s and the Vale Council could be “swallowed up†by a merger with Cardiff. 

 

The Member from Penarth Town Council informed the Committee that following on from meetings with One Voice Wales and the Minister, the views of Town and Community Councils were being taken more seriously with One Voice Wales’ Policy focusing on collaboration between Town and Community Councils as they disliked the idea of mergers.

 

A Member of the Vale of Glamorgan Council stated that the Vale Council should work in collaboration with Town and Community Councils to formulate a joint response / approach to the Williams report.  The issue of Town and Community Councils not being able to vote at Community Liaison Committee meetings was also raised, with the Chairman informing Committee that any agreement or dissent via a show of hands was always conveyed to Cabinet in the minutes of the meetings as appropriate.

 

A Member asked whether the Vale of Glamorgan Council was carrying out any work on a voluntary merger in light of the Williams report and stated that they had hoped this was not the case particularly as there were forthcoming Welsh Assembly elections and that unitary authorities should not be bound with regard to issues surrounding mergers.  The Chairman advised that at a recent Council meeting the Council had clearly indicated that it did not wish to merge with Cardiff.  He could also confirm that the Leader of the Vale of Glamorgan Council had been involved in neither public nor private discussions with Cardiff in relation to a voluntary merger and that this would not happen and furthermore, that the Leader was the first Leader in Wales to oppose the Williams Commission report for many reasons and that any discussions would not be happening with Cardiff County Council or with Welsh Government. 

 

At the conclusion of the debate it was suggested that Cabinet be requested to undertake further dialogue with Town and Community Councils in respect of the matter as they had felt they had not been included in any debate on the issue.

 

Following consideration of the report, it was subsequently unanimously,

 

AGREED –

 

(1)       T H A T the report of the Williams Commission on Public Service Governance and Delivery as it related to Town and Community Councils and Barry Town Council’s response to the Report be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the above views of the Community Liaison Committee be forwarded for their consideration.

 

(3)       T H A T Cabinet be requested to approach Town and Community Councils in the Vale of Glamorgan to seek their views on the implications of the Williams Commission Report with a view to supporting a joint approach.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       In view of the contents contained therein.

 

(2&3)  In order that an exchange of views can be maintained.

 

----------------------------------------------

 

 

During consideration of this matter, the Cabinet Members for Adult Services, the Environment and Visible Services and Housing, Building Maintainence and Community Safety left the room and took no part in any discussions that took place.

 

The Cabinet Member for Children’s Services took the chair and presented this item.

 

Cabinet having considered the recommendations from the Community Liaison Committee

 

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the Vale of Glamorgan Council approach Town and Community Councils in the Vale of Glamorgan to seek their views on the implications of the Williams Commission Report with a view to supporting a joint approach.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note the contents of the report.

 

(2)       To seek the views of Town and Community Councils in the Vale of Glamorgan on the implications of the Williams Commission Report with a view to supporting a joint approach.

 

C2447                        ECONOMIC VALUE OF VOLUNTEERING WITHIN THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN – VALE VOLUNTEER BUREAU –

 

The Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee on 9 July, 2014 considered the above report.

 

The Committee received the Annual Report on the economic value of volunteering within the Vale of Glamorgan. 

 

The Committee was informed that the audit of voluntary activity was firstly undertaken by the VVB 2000 where the monetary value of volunteering was calculated to be £8,207,136. Last year a figure of £34,942,587 was calculated as the average monetary value of voluntary activity in the Vale of Glamorgan.

 

This exercise was repeated by the VVB at the beginning of 2014.  Questionnaires were sent out to all recruiting organisations based in the Vale and registered with VVB.  For the purposes of ascertaining the monetary value of volunteering these averages were then applied to the 190 recruiting organisations registered with the VVB and operating in the Vale of Glamorgan. From this information the VVB were also able to calculate the total number of volunteering hours that had taken place.

 

The information received from the returned questionnaires provided the average number of active volunteers per organisation, and the average number of hours worked by those volunteers each week.  The figure of £11.08 was then applied which according to the 2011 Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings was the average hourly rate.  A calculation based on this hourly rate and the information received from recruiting organisations was undertaken by the VVB.

 

In comparison with the previous year the monetary value of volunteering had risen from £34,942,587 to £46,470,000, which was an increase of £11,527,413.

 

There had also been an increase in the number of volunteering hours carried out in the Vale of Glamorgan.  Last year 3,153,663 volunteering hours were conducted and this year it had increased to 4,194,043, an increase of 1,040,380 hours.

 

This increase can be attributed to the rise in the number of volunteers recruited through the core service and the young persons’ and supported volunteering project. The VCVS also had a greater presence in the Western Vale through outreach sessions and a shop fronted premises in Llantwit Major that is shared with Adult and Community Learning.  This facility was also available to recruiting organisations to use to further promote their services and opportunities.   It should also be noted that this was an average figure and only provided a snap shot of the voluntary activity taking place in the Vale of Glamorgan.  The type of volunteering referred to in this report related to formal volunteering.

 

Following presentation of the report Members were offered the opportunity to ask questions. A Member noted there had been an astonishing increase in the value of volunteering from the previous year of over £11m and asked if the representative from the VVB could attribute this to anything in particular.  The Committee was informed that it was down to wider society, high levels of unemployment and changes in benefits and that volunteering was now being championed as a route back into employment.  7% of those who volunteered were retired in 2013, 10% were 60+ years and 3% of these 60+ individuals were actively seeking employment and volunteering represented a stepping stone into employment. 

 

A Member queried the average hourly rate of £11.08 contained within the report and stated that this seemed high and asked whether it was the same figure last year. In response it was confirmed that the figure was £10.42 last year and that the hours for volunteering had increased which had had the biggest impact on the figures. 

 

A Member recommended that the increase in volunteering hours contained within the report be noted as a remarkable increase. 

 

Following consideration of the report, the Committee

 

AGREED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the report be noted and the 71 fold return on their investment through voluntary activity alone was acknowledged.

 

(2)       T H A T the report be referred to Cabinet and other Members of the Council for information.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To acknowledge the contribution that volunteers make to the Vale of Glamorgan and to provide an annual update on the Compact Action Plan.

 

(2)       To apprise all Members of the Council with regard to the economic value of volunteering within the Vale of Glamorgan.

 

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Cabinet  having considered the recommendations of the Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee.

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted and thanks be given to all those who gave up their time volunteering throughout the Vale of Glamorgan.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the contents of the report.

 

C2448                        REVENUE AND CAPITAL MONITORING FOR THE PERIOD 1st  APRIL 2014  TO 31st  MAY 2014 (REF) –

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health) on 14 July, 2014 considered the above report of the Director of Social Services.

 

The Operational Manager – Accountancy presented the report the purpose of which was to advise Members of the position in respect of revenue and capital expenditure for the period 1st April to 31st May 2014. 

  

Revenue

 

As it remained early in the financial year, the current forecast for Social Services was a balanced budget.  In addition to increased demand for services, there was pressure on the Directorate to achieve its savings targets for 2014/15 onwards.

 

A table and graph setting out the variance between profiled budget and actual expenditure to date and the projected position at year end were attached at Appendix 1 to the report.  The Appendix also included a graph showing the trend in Adult Services expenditure to budget for the year to date.

 

Children and Young People's Services - The major issue concerning this service was the continued pressure on the children’s placements budget.  Any increase in the number of children becoming looked after by the Council over the year could have a significant impact on the service.  The Joint Budget for Residential Placements for Looked After Children was set this year at £3.335m.  Currently the projected outturn was for a balanced budget.

 

Adult Services - The major issue concerning this service was the continued pressure on the Community Care Packages budget.  This budget was extremely volatile and could be adversely affected by outside influences.  While the budget was currently showing a breakeven position, there would be great pressure on this budget throughout the coming year and Committee would be advised of any change in this position.  The annual deferred income budget for 2014/15 had been set at £725k and £107k had been received as at 31st May 2014, which was slightly behind the current budget profile of £121k.

 

The Social Services Directorate was committed to achieving a balanced budget in 2014/15 while delivering the approved savings.

 

Capital

 

Appendix 2 to the report detailed financial progress on the Capital Programme as at 31st May 2014.

 

The monitoring report showed that actual expenditure for the month of May 2014 was matched by a similar figure in the 'profile to date' column, thereby showing no variances.  Profiled expenditure had been requested from Project Managers and would be updated in the next report.

 

Members should be aware that Appendix 2 to the report did not include requests for unspent committed expenditure to be slipped from 2013/14 into 2014/15.  A request for this slippage would be included in the Closing Down report presented to a future Cabinet meeting.

 

For all schemes where it was evident that the full year's budget would not be spent during the year, the relevant officers were required to provide an explanation for the shortfall and this would be taken to the earliest available Cabinet.

 

Social Services Budget Programme Update 

 

On 5th March 2014, Council also approved the savings targets for 2014/15 and the initial savings targets for 2015/16 and 2016/17.  Due to the pressures on the community care package budget, it was approved that £125k of the 2014/15 saving be deferred until 2015/16 and a further £300k deferred from 2015/16 to 2016/17.

 

The Directorate was currently required to find savings totalling £3.97m by the end of 2016/17.  The surplus shown was as a result of the foster carer recruitment project and could be used to mitigate any additional savings to be found in future years.

 

The following table shows the approved savings targets and the savings identified by year.  It includes the £293,000 identified in 2012/13 in excess of the saving target for that year.

 

Year

Savings Required

£000

Savings Identified

£000

In Year Surplus/ (Shortfall)

£000

Cumulative Surplus/   (Shortfall)

£000

Previously Identified Savings

 

293

293

293

2014/15

713

454

(259)

34

2015/16

1,600

1,676

76

110

2016/17

1,657

1,733

76

186

TOTAL

3,970

4,156

 

 

           

Appendix 3 to the report detailed the latest progress for each savings project currently identified. 

 

The Social Services Directorate was committed to achieving a balanced budget.  The Corporate Budget Programme Board for Social Services and project teams overseeing the plan would continue to develop it further and ensure delivery and progress.  Progress updates would be reported as part of the overall financial monitoring report for the Directorate.

 

A Committee Member queried with officers as to how confident they were that a balanced budget for this year would be achieved.  In reply Members were informed that extra care had been highlighted as an area of concern due to the delay in the completion of the facility within Barry.  Members were also asked to note the volatile nature of the budget for residential care packages. 

 

In referring to the budget savings plan, a Member queried if this included provision.  The Operational Manager – Accountancy advised Members that this did not include provision and the use of provisions would be assessed at year end if budgets were overspent. 

 

A Committee Member, making reference to the recent foster care recruitment campaign, asked if this had made a difference.  In reply the Head of Children and Young People Services stated that the campaign had made an impact and that all the targets had been met. 

 

The Committee sought clarification around whether savings within the back office were being considered before any possible front line savings.  The Director of Social Services informed the Committee that any detailed review of the structure of the service placed significant emphasis on maintaining front line services over back office functions.

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the position with regard to the 2014/15 revenue and capital monitoring be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the progress made in delivering the Social Services Budget Programme be noted and referred to Cabinet for information.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       That Members are aware of the position with regard to the 2014/15 revenue and capital monitoring relevant to the Scrutiny Committee.

 

(2)       That Members are aware of the progress being made to date on the Social Services Budget Programme.

 

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Cabinet having considered the recommendations of the Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health)

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the contents of the report.

 

C2449                        SOCIAL SERVICES END OF YEAR PERFORMANCE REPORT 2013/14 AND TARGET SETTING 2014/15 (REF) -

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health) on 14 July, 2014 considered the above report of the Director of Social Services.

 

The Committee were presented with end of year performance and action monitoring reports for the year ending 2013/14 and were notified of the changes to performance indicators and performance targets for 2014/15.

 

In reviewing the target setting for 2014/15 a Committee Member raised an issue concerning the level of target setting for the following performance indicators, it being noted that in some cases, the current target setting was significantly lower than actual performance achieved in previous years.  These specifically related to

 

           SS02/M004Q – the percentage of initial assessments that were completed during the year where there is evidence that the child has been seen by a worker

           SCC016Q – the percentage of reviews of child in need plans carried out in accordance with the statutory timetable

           SCC007cQ – the percentage of referrals during the year that did not proceed to allocation for initial assessment

 

It was agreed that the Head of Children and Young People Services would look into the target setting for these particular performance indicators and would inform the Committee Members accordingly. 

 

In reviewing SCC037A, the average external points score for 16 year old LAC, Members were advised that the target level seemed low when compared to actual performance as a result of exceptional performance by a looked after child, but that the target setting needed to reflect the cohort.

 

A Committee Member sought clarification as to how the delayed transfer of care figure was calculated.  In response the Head of Adult Services advised Members that this was a very complex undertaking and that he would provide an explanation of the performance indicator’s calculation to each Member individually via e-mail. 

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the service performance results and remedial actions to be undertaken to address service and performance be noted (paragraphs 5 to 12 with full details in Appendix 1).

 

(2)       T H A T progress to update in achieving key outcomes as outlined in the Corporate Plan 2013-17 and the Improvement Plan Part 1 2013/14 be noted (paragraphs 6-7 with full details in Appendix 1).

 

(3)       T H A T proposed service targets for 2014/15 be considered (paragraphs 12 – 14 with full details in Appendix 2).

 

4)         T H A T Cabinet consider the Committee’s recommendation to review the 2014/15 performance target setting for the following performance indicators:

 

           SS02/M004Q – the percentage of initial assessments that were completed during the year where there is evidence that the child has been seen by a worker

           SCC016Q – the percentage of reviews of child in need plans carried out in accordance with the statutory timetable

           SCC007cQ – the percentage of referrals during the year that did not proceed to allocation for initial assessment.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To ensure the Council is effectively assessing its performance in line with the requirement to secure continuous improvement outlined in the Local Government (Wales) Measure 2009.

 

(2)       To enable the Council to demonstrate achievement of its objectives and identify service areas for improvement work.

 

(3)       To ensure challenging targets are set against the Council’s measures for improvement, reflecting the Council’s commitment to continuously improve services whilst mindful of significant financial and service demand pressures of the coming year.

 

(4)       Cabinet have final decision making powers.               

 

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Cabinet having considered the recommendations of the Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health)

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the 2014/15 performance target setting for the following performance indicators as detailed below be reviewed.

 

           SS02/M004Q – the percentage of initial assessments that were completed during the year where there is evidence that the child has been seen by a worker

           SCC016Q – the percentage of reviews of child in need plans carried out in accordance with the statutory timetable

          SCC007cQ – the percentage of referrals during the year that did not proceed to allocation for initial assessment.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note the contents of the report.

 

(2)       To review the 2014/15 performance target setting.indicators as outlined in recommendation 2 above.

 

C2450                        VISIBLE SERVICES END OF YEAR PERFORMANCE REPORT 2013/14 AND TARGET SETTING 2014/15 (REF) -

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) on 15 July, 2014 considered the above report of the Director of Visible Services and Housing.

 

The report highlighted that the Department had completed 31% of its service plan actions at end of year, with a further 9% on track for later completion date.  Of the 55 actions in the plan 17 were completed, 5 were on track, 31 had slipped with 2 not having yet been started. 

 

The department had completed 25% of the actions against the Corporate Plan that were included in the 2013/14 service plan and a further 33% of actions were on track for a later completion date. Of the 12 actions within the service plan, 3 were completed, 4 were on track, 4 had slipped and 1 had not been started. 43% of the Improvement Objective actions had also been completed with a further 14% on track towards a later completion date. Of the 7 actions within the service plan, 3 had been completed, 1 was on track and 3 had slipped.

 

There were no Outcome Agreement actions in the 2013/14 plan, as the Outcome Agreement had not been agreed until 1st April 2014.

 

Of the 34 performance indicators in the plan, 5 (15%) did not have targets set for 2013/14. 15 (44%) had met or exceeded target at end of year, 4 (12%) were within 10% of target and 2 (6%) missed target by more than 10%. Data was unavailable for 8 (23%) indicators.

 

Members however in considering the report did not accept that the report reflected a realistic position and suggested that more realistic performance indicators should be considered.  In relation to civil parking enforcement figures, Committee was aware that a further report was awaited and considered that the PIs needed to be looked at in order to identify exactly what Members wished to capture. In accepting that some P I ‘s were nationally set and unable to be altered  the Operational Manager for Waste Cleansing and Management advised that the department was currently reviewing its local indicators .  Members in particular referred to the fact that they wished to capture data that provided information on how much better parking was, as opposed to how many people had been ticketed. 

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the report be noted and Cabinet advised that the Committee requested that further consideration be given to more meaningful performance  indicators being identified and realistic targets set.

 

(2)       T H A T the Committee receives an update report to a future meeting on the maintenance of potholes in the Vale and the materials to be used.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To allow for robust scrutiny.

 

(2)       To apprise Members.

 

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At the meeting the Cabinet Member for the Environment and Visible Services confirmed that the performance indicators outlined in Appendix 1 attached to the report were now up to date.

 

Cabinet having considered the recommendations of the Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment)

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the contents of the report.

 

C2451                        VALE OF GLAMORGAN DESTINATION ACTION PLAN (REF)  –

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) on 15 July, 2014 considered the above report.

 

At its meeting on 16th June, 2014 Cabinet had referred the report to the Scrutiny Committee as part of the consultation process.  Destination Management was defined by Visit Wales as “co-ordinating all the activities and services which impacted on the visitor and their enjoyment of a destinationâ€.  Such activities and services included those provided by the Council as well as others and could include accommodation, cafés, shops, events and cultural experiences.  To assist in bringing all various elements together, Visit Wales had tasked local authorities to develop Destination Action Plans (DAP).  It was suggested that the DAP for a particular area should summarise the current situation with reference to Destination Management, should consider strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats, relating to the area and include a list of actions or projects.  It was also indicated that the DAP would be important in providing supporting evidence in funding applications.

 

The draft DAP for the Vale of Glamorgan was attached to the report, the structure for which had followed that suggested by Visit Wales.  The first part of the Plan was strategic in nature, containing an introduction and relevant context and background to the Vale of Glamorgan and the importance of tourism.  This element also included an assessment, focusing on strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.  The Plan set out a vision, priorities and actions that were listed as follows:

 

           Raising the profile

           Improving the public realm and tourism infrastructure

           Enhancing the tourism product and experience

           Enhancing the sense of place

           Improving leadership and delivery.

 

The Plan was currently in draft form and had been agreed by Cabinet for consultation purposes.  Consultation would involve discussions with relevant stakeholders and officers were currently exploring the option of holding an event to bring stakeholders together to discuss the draft DAP.  The DAP would also be the subject of this year’s Business Breakfast event of the Vale of Glamorgan Show.  Following consultation and incorporation of any changes and amendments, the Plan would then be proposed to the Council for adoption, following a further report to Cabinet.

 

The Cabinet Member for Regeneration, Innovation, Planning and Transportation, with permission to speak, advised that the Plan would ensure that co-ordination takes place and that visitors have an holistic approach.  She also referred to a recent example of a good initiative which had boosted the local economy, namely the Pitch a Tent Initiative and information was being gathered as to the amount of money that such an initiative had brought to the locality.  The Cabinet Member advised that in her view the Plan was an excellent document for which views and comments were welcomed. 

 

A suggestion made was that officers should consider sponsoring a competition or “working with trip advisor†an online facility to raise the profile for small businesses in the area. 

 

In considering the report reference was also made to the use of abbreviations contained therein with the request that they be expanded upon in order for people to understand the context.  The opportunity to establish a touring caravan site was also suggested by a Member who advised that Barry had no defined touring caravan site and that the consultation on the document could be an excellent opportunity for consideration of such a site in order to assist with boosting the local economy.  The Member also referred to a number of supermarkets in England who offered a certain amount of their car parking space to touring caravan operators which not only benefitted the towns, but also benefitted the local supermarket as people are more likely to spend money there.  It was clear that in his view the Council needed to consider the assets it has and use them more wisely and consider more imaginative initiatives. 

 

Reference was also made by some Members to the recent refurbishment of the Cardiff Airport with a further suggestion being made that a satisfaction survey should be handed out to people as they come through departures which could provide good information on the service.  Members, aware that the workload for the tourism department would be considerable in the future, suggested that it was important that the Council consider strengthening the tourism team at the opportune moment.  It was Members view that if the Council felt that tourism was a high priority, then consideration would need to be given to strengthening the team accordingly. 

 

It was subsequently

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the Cabinet recommendations be endorsed.

 

(2)       T H A T the issues identified by the Committee as outlined above be referred to Cabinet and the Tourism Department for consideration during the consultation process.

 

(3)       T H A T following the consultation process a further report be presented to the Scrutiny Committee with the results of the consultation and with any revisions necessary to the Destination Action Plan.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       In recognition of the consultation process identified for the draft Destination Action Plan.

 

(2)       In view of the comments made at the meeting.

 

(3)       To allow the Committee to consider a final Plan following the results of the consultation.

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Cabinet having considered the recommendations of the Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment)

 

At the meeting, the Cabinet Member for Regeneration, Innovation, Planning and Transportation commented that there was a mistake at the bottom of page one of the scrutiny reference report, the title ‘Pitch a Tent Initiative’ should be actually named  'Perfect Pitch Initiative’

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the contents of the report.

 

C2452            THE STRATEGIC APPOINTMENT OF LOCAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY SCHOOL GOVERNORS IN THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN SCHOOLS (REF) –

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Lifelong Learning) on 17 July, 2014 considered the above report

 

The report had been referred by Cabinet at its meeting on 16th June as part of the consultation process in order to provide opportunity for scrutiny by Members of the Committee. 

 

The Cabinet Member for Children’s Services, in presenting the report, advised that approval had been sought to consult with the Vale of Glamorgan school governors on the implementation of a more strategic approach to the appointment of Local Authority (LA) governors in Vale schools.  The Council currently appointed approximately 182 LA school governors and the recruitment and appointment process for LA governors was set out in the Council’s Policy on the Appointment of LA Governors which was attached at Appendix 1 to the report.

 

It was noted that all LA governor vacancies were advertised on the Council’s website in accordance with the Council’s policy.  This included those whose terms of office came to an end as well as any vacancies due to resignations.  The term of office for LA governors was four years and after this time the Governor Support Unit (GSU) wrote to the governor to inform them that their term of office was due to cease with an invitation extended to them to reapply if they wished to continue.  The report highlighted where improvements could be made to the current recruitment system of LA governors under the following headings:

 

           Advertising of current vacancies - At present vacancies were advertised on the Council's website but were not always given high priority. It was proposed that the vacancies were given a higher profile and that opportunities were explored with local and regional employers to draw these vacancies to the attention of their staff living in the Vale of Glamorgan.

 

           Potential for panel pre-selection briefing session - In the current arrangements, no briefing was provided to the selection panel, although the Head of Governor Support attended the panel meeting to advise where necessary. Such a briefing could provide the panel with information about forthcoming challenges to school leadership and also help determine the nature of additional expertise that governing bodies would need to call upon in future years, particularly in schools facing challenges. 

 

           Potential for expertise and skill-set mapping – Information, as aforementioned, could play an important part in determining the specific expertise required of a governing body.  This could provide helpful guidance to the panel and would be supportive of a more strategic approach to the appointment of LA governors.

 

           Vale School Governors’ Association (VSGA) – A VSGA member currently sat on the panel but in a non-voting observer capacity. This role could be developed further to inform the work of the panel by sharing intelligence about the challenges and opportunities provided through involvement in the strategic leadership of schools, such as that reflected in the membership of the VSGA.

 

           Potential for Continual Professional Development (CPD) – for school leadership for governors – Additionally, LA governors could be brought together at the start and end of each academic year to develop a shared understanding about successes and challenges facing our schools.

 

The report also recommended that consultation with Vale school governors via the VSGA should take place in the following areas:

 

           The Chief Officer and / or the Head of School Improvement and Inclusion to attend meetings of the selection panel for LA appointed school governors

           The Chief Officer / Head of School Improvement to provide a school / LA briefing to the selection panel in advance of any selection taking place to outline the nature of schools' needs and challenges, where LA governor vacancies exist

           High profile advertising and targeted recruitment should be in place to widen the pool of potential governors

           The GSU to compile an “expertise and experience register†of existing LA school governors

           The GSU to compile a “register of need†for LA governor expertise as expressed by schools / Chairs of governors

           A selection panel utilising a “map and gap†approach based on skills / expertise and school needs, when selecting LA school governors should be established

           The GSU to keep up to date an LA governors attendance register

           The GSU to work with the Head of Service / Lead Officer for School Improvement and the JES to devise leadership development opportunities for LA governors

           The LA governor selection panel to adopt a more strategic and prioritised approach to LA governor selection and one which was more sharply focused on the needs and challenges of the individual school

           A review and redeployment of existing LA governors to new schools should be carried out to, determine LA governors by needs of the school

           Proposals should be considered by Cabinet after consultation had taken place and a new strategy be adopted as soon as possible.

 

The Scrutiny Committee had itself also requested to discuss the issue of Governor Training at a future meeting and the issue had also been raised following recent School Progress Performance Panel meetings.  A Member of the Committee referred to the fact that the report only appeared to address the role of LA governors.  The Cabinet Member however, advised that parent governors and Foundation governors were not appointed by the Council although he did acknowledge that minority appointed governors could possibly be considered in the same way as LA Governors by discussing the issues with respective Town and Community Councils.

 

The Cabinet Member further stated that he had considered in detail the process for the appointment of LA governors as historically appointments had been made on the basis that an elected Member was appointed as an LA Governor. It had become more and more apparent in relation to school performance issues that governors should be appointed for their particular expertise and skills and to also be provided with opportunities to develop their skills.  The new strategic approach that was to be adopted would allow for appointments to be made based on experience and skills and on a local skills mix for example encouraging local business people to apply  for Governor positions.

 

The application form also needed to be more stringent in order to identify a person’s commitment for the position and the reason why they were applying for the post.  Although the Cabinet Member was fully aware that the positions were voluntary, the ever increasing responsibilities being placed on governors would require further support and training which he considered needed to be addressed.  A number of Members were concerned about the current number of vacancies that existed and that by strengthening the application process, they felt this could mean that people may not wish to apply.  The Cabinet Member, in accepting the comments, stated that nevertheless he still considered the Council needed to actively seek more experienced and skilled governors.

 

Another Member raised a concern that there was currently no mechanism in place for LA governors to report back to the Council and that in his view this should be part of the process.  The Chairman agreed that it was important that any LA representative reported back to the Council any issues that they found in order that these could be addressed as early on in the process as possible.

 

The Cabinet Member recognised and agreed that there were areas that could be improved upon but stated that this strategy was a start in the process. 

 

The Chairman in referring to the responsibility of being a governor and the importance of understanding performance data, stated that there was an urgent need to address training for Governors and concurred with the Cabinet Member that the Council needed to actively seek people with different skills and abilities across a range of experience and that LA representatives needed to be empowered to be an early warning system for the Local Authority. 

 

Following considerable discussion and responses to questions raised, it was subsequently

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the proposal for consultation and implementation in the future on a more strategic approach for the appointment of Local Authority Governors be  endorsed.

 

(2)       T H A T the comments of the Scrutiny Committee be referred to Cabinet for consideration as part of the consultation process.

 

(3)       T H A T following the consultation a further report be presented to the Scrutiny Committee in due course.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       That Vale of Glamorgan Governing Bodies were well supported with specific expertise and experience.

 

(2)       To apprise Cabinet

 

(3)       For consideration by the Committee following the consultation process.

 

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Cabinet having considered the recommendations of the Scrutiny Committee (Lifelong Learning) -

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the results of the consultation with Vale School Governors  be reported to future meetings of the Cabinet and Scrutiny Committee (Lifelong Learning).

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note the contents of the report

 

(2)       To keep Members appraised of the consultation results

 

 

C2453                        OUTCOME AGREEMENT 2013-2016: END OF YEAR REPORT FOR 2013/14 (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) –

 

Cabinet were advised on progress with the achievement of the Outcome Agreement that was agreed with the Welsh Government (WG) on 1 April, 2014.

 

The Council entered into four previous agreements with the Welsh Government (Policy Agreements in 2001-04 and 2004-07, an Improvement Agreement in 2008-2010 and an Outcome Agreement in 2010-2013). The agreements were based on the premise that shared common objectives and  agreements could be entered into to assist in achieving these objectives. Welsh Government paid a grant to the Council to incentivise achievement of targets, to the value of £1.2 million annually.

           

As reported to CMT in July 2013, under the new Agreement there were fewer outcomes (reduced from 10 to 5) to reflect the difficult budgetary decisions councils had  to make. Some of the grant (30%) would now be targeted to address known weaknesses rather than given as an unhypothecated reward.  Finally, the agreement must be linked to the WG 'Programme for Government' and to the Vale's 'Single Integrated Plan' (Community Strategy).

 

If successful in achieving its targets and avoiding statutory intervention, the Council could expect to receive £1.2 million per year of the term of the agreement. 70% of the grant was unhypothecated and would be paid into the general funds of the Council. The remaining 30% of the grant was unhypothecated unless the Council received statutory intervention.

 

Following negotiations with Welsh Government, an Outcome Agreement covering the period 2013 to 2016 was finalised and signed off by the Minister for Local Government and Government Business on 1 April, 2014.

 

The attached report at Appendix 1 to the report provided details of progress against actions and performance measures, along with a summary of the outcomes achieved.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the report on the Vale's achievement of Outcome Agreement Year 1 outcomes attached at Appendix 1 to the report be endorsed.

 

(2)       T H A T closer scrutiny during 2014/15 of those areas where the Council had not achieved its actions and targets takes place and  proactive action be taken to ensure that they are achieved in 2014/15 as outlined in Appendix 1, (pages, 5, 9,13,14, and 19) attached to the report..

 

(3)       T H A T the report be forwarded on to the Minister for Local Government for assessment.

 

 

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To endorse the achievement of the outcomes listed in the Agreement as attached at Appendix 1 attached to the report.

 

(2)       To ensure that the Council  was fully successful in achieving all agreed outcomes.

 

(3)       In order for Welsh Government to release the performance incentive grant.to the Council

 

C2454                        THE REVISED POLICY FOR THE APPOINTMENT OF LOCAL AUTHORITY SCHOOL GOVERNORS (CS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – LIFELONG LEARNING) –

 

Approval was sought to revise the policy for the appointment of Local Authority school governors.      

 

At the meeting on 16 June 2014 Cabinet agreed to consult with Vale of Glamorgan school governors on the implementation of a more strategic approach to the appointment of Local Authority governors in our schools. (Cabinet minutes-16 June)

 

Consultation had now taken place and the responses compiled. Were attached at Appendix 1 to the report and the revised Policy for appointing Local Authority school governors was attached at Appendix 2 to the report.:

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the revised policy for implementation in September 2014 be approved.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

To ensure a more strategic process is used when appointing Local Authority school governors so that governing bodies in schools of greatest need are better supported with specific expertise and experience.

 

 

C2455                        WELSH GOVERNMENT CONSULTATION: DRAFT TECHNICAL ADVICE NOTE (TAN) 1 JOINT HOUSING LAND AVAILABILITY STUDIES (RIPT) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) -      

 

Cabinet  were advised of the Welsh Government’s consultation on Technical Advice Note (TAN) 1 Joint Housing Land Availability Studies and approval  was sought  for the report as the Council’s formal response to the consultation.

 

Planning Policy Wales (PPW) set the context for sustainable land use planning policy within which Local Authorities' statutory Local Development Plans (LDPs) were prepared and development control decisions on individual planning applications and appeals were made. PPW was supplemented by a suite of topic based Technical Advice Notes (TANs) and procedural guidance was contained within circulars and policy clarification letters.

 

It was important that planning policy continued to evolve to accommodate changing circumstances. Accordingly, the Welsh Government (WG) continually monitored PPW and TANs in relation to their objectives for Wales and when necessary, published updated national planning guidance.

 

The Council’s proposed response to the Technical Advice Note (TAN) 1 Joint Housing Land Availability Studies consultation was attached at Appendix A to the report.

 

The mains points of the Council’s proposed submission were summarised below:

 

Removing the ability of LPAs without an adopted UDP/LDP to evidence a 5 year housing supply would seriously undermine the principles of sustainable development inherent within national planning policy.  Moreover while it was good practice to incentivise LDP preparation, Welsh Government would be aware of the timetable for plan preparation which was often elongated by factors outside of a Council’s control such as judicial review and the significance of public opinion.

 

It was not necessarily the case that an adopted LDP ensured the provision of the required 5 year housing land supply. Of the 14 LPAs which had an adopted LDP, 11 presently did not have a 5 year housing land supply, and in the case of both Caerphilly and Merthyr Tydfil Councils neither had achieved a 5 year supply since adopting their LDPs in 2010 and 2011 respectively.

 

The proposal would increase speculative and potentially undesirable development proposals, placing unnecessary additional pressure on LPAs, at a time when resources were already being stretched - potentially redirecting resources away from LDP work, leading to delays in their progression.

 

The proposal was likely to lead to an increase in appeals and more worryingly legal challenges to decisions from local communities and developers.

 

The proposal could potentially undermine emerging LDPs as sites other than those identified within Deposit LDPs would inevitably come forward speculatively.  This was the experience of the Vale of Glamorgan during 2012/13 when the Council’s JHLAS showed a less than 5 year housing land supply.

 

Councillors had to make brave and informed decisions to approve housing schemes which were not in an adopted but time expired UDP in order to continue to ensure a 5 years supply was maintained.  In the Vale of Glamorgan, such decisions had been properly made by Councillors who clearly understood the reasoning behind the land supply argument.  If the proposal was to be implemented there would be no perceived benefit or incentive to approve controversial housing developments as this would not improve a Councils Housing land supply figures.  It was possible that the planning system and more importantly the delivery of housing land could be delayed and the appeals system overwhelmed with such applications, which would be to no one’s benefit.

 

The prospect of the “No plan, No Housing Supply†situation could actually hinder the LDP process, slow the delivery of housing land and undermine the ability for LPAs to appropriately and sustainably manage development and the delivery of essential infrastructure.

 

That it was the current LDP process that required a complete and timely overhaul - presently the process was considered to be unnecessarily technical and bureaucratic which from experience disenfranchised the public; and the number of statutory consultation stages were considered cumbrous, time consuming and resource intense, and arguably the key reason of delays in LDP coverage within Wales.  This was especially the case in areas of high land values and development pressures such as the Vale of Glamorgan.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the Council’s formal response to the Welsh Government consultation on Technical Advice Note (TAN) 1 Joint Housing Land Availability Studies as attached at Appendix A to the report be approved.

 

(2)       T H A T the report be referred to Planning Committee and Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) for information.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To approve of the response prepared to the consultation on Technical Advice Note (TAN) 1 Joint Housing Land Availability Studies as attached at Appendix A to the report

 

(2)       To advise Planning Committee and the Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) of the recent public consultation.

 

C2456                        TRANSPORT SAVINGS PROGRAMME UPDATE (EVS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES)

 

Cabinet was advised of the work being undertaken to review the Council’s current transport arrangements and approval was sought to determine the actions and resource profile required for the introduction of a comprehensive transport savings programme.

 

A requirement to review significant areas of current spend, including arrangements related to vehicle transport was highlighted via the Council’s 2012 / 2013 medium term financial plan. In December 2013, a diagnostic review of current transport arrangements was commissioned by Corporate Management team in order to identify both process improvements and significant cashable savings in respect to the transport operations of the Council.

 

The diagnostic review project was sponsored by the Director of Visible Services and Housing and project managed by the Senior Business Improvement Partner. As a result of a competitive tendering process to obtain the services of an experienced transport change partner, Edge Public Solutions were selected to perform the diagnostic review, supported by a member of the Council’s Business Improvement team.

 

The review required a detailed analysis of existing transport related service arrangements in order to identify;

 

strengths, weaknesses and opportunities relating to current service delivery processes,

consideration of internal opportunities for improvement,

an appraisal of change options,

clear recommendations for future operating models and;

a detailed project plan to support the implementation of a transformational change programme that would enable significant cost savings to be achieved; targeted at a budget reduction of approximately £1m addition to the £690k savings already identified by departments for the 2014/15 budget.

 

The diagnostic review was conducted between February and April 2014, led by experienced Transport Consultants from Edge Public Solutions and supported via internal staff from the Council's Business Improvement team. Interviews and work studies were held with over 60 staff and suppliers during the course of the review.

 

The Vale of Glamorgan Transport Review†was attached at Appendix 1 to the report and provided a detailed assessment of the current transport arrangements and scope for improvement across the service areas,

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the recommended actions required by the Transport Savings programme detailed within the Transport Savings report attached at Appendix 1 to the report be agreed in principle.

 

(2)       T H A T the outline resource profile required to undertake the actions required by the Transport Savings programme be agreed in principle.

 

(3)       T H A T the report be referred to the Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) for consideration and the Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) for information.

 

(4)       T H A T a further report be presented to Cabinet following the above Scrutiny process.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To approve in principle the Transport Savings programme.

 

(2)       To approve in principle the Transport Savings programme resource profile.

 

(3)       To enable the Transport Savings programme and required actions to be subject to the appropriate scrutiny.

 

(4)       To consider the views of the Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) prior to taking a decision on the final Transport Savings programme.

 

 

 

 

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