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Agenda Item No.

 

CABINET

 

Minutes of a meeting held on 20 October, 2014.

 

Present: Councillor S.C. Egan (Chairman), Councillors: B.E. Brooks, L. Burnett, R. Curtis, C.P.J. Elmore and G. John.

 

Apologies: Councillor N. Moore.

                                                    

C2484                        MINUTES –

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the meeting held on 6 October, 2014 be approved as a correct record.

 

C2285            DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST –

 

The following declaration of interest was received

 

Councillor C.Elmore.

Agenda Item No 11 – Central South Consortium Legal Agreement.

 

Reason for Declaration –

He was a Member and Chair of the Central South Consortium Joint Committee. As a Local Authority Appointee he was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

 

 

C2486                        CARDIFF BAY ADVISORY COMMITTEE -                  

 

The following minutes of the Cardiff Bay Advisory Committee held on 17 September, 2014 were submitted.

 

Present: 

 

Councillor L. Burnett (Chair)         Vale of Glamorgan Council

Ms. C. Dimond (Vice Chair)           Cardiff Flood Action Committee

Mr. N. Ajax-Lewis MBE       Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales

Mr. J. Harrison          Natural Resources Wales

Councillor G. Roberts         Penarth Town Council

 

Also present:

 

Mr. J. Maidment        Cardiff Harbour Authority

Mr. T. Gifford Cardiff Harbour Authority

Mr. D. Hall     Cardiff Harbour Authority

Mr. C. Hope   Vale of Glamorgan Council

 

(a)       Apologies for Absence -

 

These were received from Councillor Bob Derbyshire (Cardiff Council), Mr. C. Michael (RSPB), Ms. S. Newbold (British Marine Federation and Royal Yachting Association), Mr. A. Vye-Parminter (Harbour Master) and Ms. L. Jackson (Cardiff Bay Yacht Club).

 

(b)       Minutes -

 

AGREED - T H A T the Minutes of the meeting held on 4th June, 2014 be approved as a correct record subject to it being recorded that Councillor Roberts had requested that a future meeting of the Advisory Committee receive a presentation on ‘Where we are now’ and outlining what ambitions could be achieved across the Bay.

 

It was suggested that Kath Richards, Operational Manager Events and Neil Hanratty, Economic Development, Cardiff Council attend the meeting. 

 

(c)        Matters Arising -

 

With regard to the reference to an incident of Japanese Knotweed in Penarth Marina, the Advisory Committee were advised that Mr. Maidment had spoken to the Parks and Grounds Maintenance Manager of the Vale of Glamorgan Council who had agreed to look at the affected areas. 

 

Councillor Roberts observed that some of the affected areas now appeared to be under control.

 

(d)       Navigational Safety -

 

Mr. Gifford advised the Committee of a minor collision that had occurred in one of the locks involving leisure and commercial vessels. 

 

Following interviews with the Captains of the vessels, recommendations had been made to avoid a recurrence. 

 

(e)       Progress Reports -

 

It was reported that all works associated with the recent NATO Conference had gone well and excellent feedback had been received. 

 

Pontoons had been moved around the Bay for safety reasons, and good feedback had been received.

 

The build of the replacement sluice room was due to be completed today.

 

One new operator licence had been issued during the summer months for a passenger vehicle.

 

Further expressions of interest had been received from operators which demonstrated that the level of interest within the Bay was high.

 

Councillor Roberts, in referring to the fencing around the entrance to the Barrage stated that he had seen fishermen climbing over the fence and showed the members of the Committee photographic evidence of this. 

 

Mr. Gifford replied that this was not a new problem and the police had been requested to remove these people. 

 

The Bay Authorities did not have a permanent presence at this location.

 

A Member enquired as to the use of ASBOs to prevent recurrences.

 

The issue of Fixed Penalty Fines was also mentioned.

 

Councillor Burnett had received reports of people fishing from John Batchelor Way, and it was suggested that any information about individuals who had breached the bye-laws should be shared with the police. 

 

Mr. Maidment advised that the site assessments were under review and suggested that the risk assessments could be extended as far as the fencing around the Barrage. 

 

Mr. Maidment in referring to a problem with invasive weeds in the Bay, advised that a bid had been submitted, in conjunction with neighbouring authorities, to the Assembly with a view to raising awareness of the issue, educating people and controlling the problem. 

Discussions also ensued regarding Midge control.

 

It was

AGREED -

 

(1)       T H A T the progress report be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T future meetings of the Advisory Committee receive regular updates on the levels of illegal fishing at the Barrage.

 

(f)        Update Report - Mr. J. Harrison, Natural Resources Wales -

 

Mr. Harrison advised that:

 

           The Natural Resources Wales was continuing to liaise with the Cardiff Harbour Authority.

           There had been no fish deaths this year despite the warm weather.  The deployment of the Oxygen barge had made a significant difference although it was acknowledged that further decisions would need to be made post 2017 regarding this equipment. 

          There had been a number of minor pollution incidents, including an incidence of Blue Algae in Bute Dock (which was a normal occurrence).

          Some groundwater was seeping through the embankment into the Bay near the Sports Village and this problem was being addressed. 

           A marine licence for dredging in the area had been granted in July.

 

AGREED - T H A T the update report be noted.

 

(g)       Any Other Business -

 

(i)         Civil Aid Voluntary Rescue Association (CAVRA) - The Chairman referred to an e-mail she had received from the Chairman and Director of Operations, CAVRA which related to a recent incident in Cardiff Bay (which turned out to be a malicious false alarm).

 

Mr. Davies had expressed disappointment that CAVRA’s rescue craft had not been utilised for the incident.

 

Mr. Gifford advised that four false alarms had been received over the past few days.  The Harbour Authority had responded in accordance with the provisions of its Emergency Procedures, which were well tested.  The Emergency Procedures did not include reference to CAVRA.  Mr. Maidment advised that CAVRA’s services were used when events were held in the Bay.

 

The Chairman stated that the Vale of Glamorgan Council’s Emergency Plan included the use of CAVRA and suggested that it may be beneficial if representatives of CAVRA were invited to address the Advisory Committee to inform of their potential, for the information of the Advisory Committee.

 

It was

 

AGREED - T H A T representatives of CAVRA be invited to address a future meeting of the Advisory Committee.

 

(ii)        Penarth Docks - The Chairman advised that next year represented the 150th anniversary of the founding of Penarth Docks.

 

A ceremony was planned and the Chairman enquired if she should invite the organisers of the ceremony to address a future meeting of the Advisory Committee.

 

The suggestions was AGREED.

 

(iii)       Transport Links - The Chairman advised that discussions had taken place regarding transport links with Penarth, including the possibility of a Cross-Barrage Bus. 

 

Although acknowledging that the link was some way off, the Chairman expressed a wish that ultimately, the route would link with Cosmeston Country Park.

 

The Vale of Glamorgan Council utilised a Community Bus, called Greenlinks which could be used as part of a pilot service.

 

When further details were available, the Chairman stated that she would advise the Committee further.

 

In response, Mr. Gifford informed that timetabling problems could occur if the Barrage Bridge was raised.  Furthermore, the number of visitors milling around could cause further delays. 

 

(iv)       Venue for Meeting, 5th March, 2015 - It was reported that the timetable for meetings of the Advisory Committee included a meeting to be held at 5.15 p.m. on 5th March, 2015 and that the meeting be held in Cardiff White Water. 

 

Committee were advised that the Cardiff White Water would not be available for the meeting on that date and the Advisory Committee were invited to suggest alternative venues.

 

AGREED - T H A T the Penarth Town Council offices or The Kymin, Penarth be considered as alternative venues.

 

(h)       Date of Next Meeting -

 

AGREED - T H A T the next meeting be held on Wednesday, 19th November, 2014 at 5.15 p.m. in the Cardiff International White Water.

 

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RESOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the Cardiff Bay Advisory Committee held on 17 September, 2014 be noted.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the contents of the minutes.

 

C2487                        RESHAPING SERVICES – A NEW CHANGE PROGRAMME FOR THE COUNCIL (REF) -                      

 

The Community Liaison Committee on 17 September, 2014 considered the above report.

 

The contents of the draft Medium Term Financial Plan 2014/15 to 2017/18 report was endorsed by Cabinet on 11th August 2014 and was included within the documentation received by the Committee prior to the meeting. Mr. Alan Jenkins, Head of Finance, provided the Committee with the financial context to the Reshaping Services change programme.  The Reshaping Services Programme was a corporate change programme formulated to respond to medium term financial pressures.  The Head of Finance informed the Committee that the Vale of Glamorgan Council was required to save £32m over the next three years and advised that the Medium Term Financial Plan attempted to link the strategic planning process of the Council with the budget process and to ensure consistency between them.

 

There were various pressures on the Council including legislative and demographic pressures; the crucial financial pressure was the funding settlements from Welsh Government over the next three years.  The Head of Finance informed the Committee that the Council had received a reduced settlement last year of 5% and that there could be a settlement reduction of up to 4.5% in 2015/16. 

 

The Committee was informed that demographic issues such as an aging population were also leading to pressures on Council services such as adult social care.  The £32m savings over the next three years was based on initial indications from Welsh Government.  The Vale of Glamorgan Council had already identified approximately £18m of savings, however the Authority was still required to find another £14m worth of savings and confirmed that these figures excluded the Schools and Social Services budgets.  The Schools budget accounted for 37% of the overall Vale of Glamorgan budget and Welsh Government had made a minimum commitment to Education to provide 1% above the block grant from central government; therefore Schools had an increased budget of 0.6%.  As a result of this the level of savings required to be sourced from the remaining services would be much higher and in this scenario services outside of Education and Social Services would be required to pick up the budget shortfall.

 

The Head of Finance informed the Committee that the funding per head of population in the Vale of Glamorgan was 20th out of 22 Welsh local authorities in 2014/15 and the Council’s current Band D Council tax was below the Welsh average at £1,029.42 per annum. 

 

The Head of Finance informed the Committee that this situation was likely to continue beyond 2017/18 and that the situation could be underestimated due to the different legislation coming into existence e.g. Future Generations Bill and also due to unknown cost pressures and future funding reductions.  Other changes in legislation could also have an impact, such as the £50 cap on non-residential care. 

 

The Committee was shown a slide which modelled the future funding spending for the average local authority in Wales as provided by the WLGA for the period 2014/15 to 2024/25.  The slide showed that approximately £30m of the funding and spending were for set budgets, e.g. precepts etc.  There would be a slight increase in the budget for Education and also an increase in the budget for Social Services with various pressures on these services in areas such as Adult and Children’s Services.  The slide also showed that there would be a reduction in the overall budgets for local authorities in Wales and that all other services would have reduced budgets; and some services would no longer be in operation.  The Head of Finance informed the Committee therefore that the Authority would be required to look at different ways of providing services due to the savings that were required. 

 

A Member stated that statutory services were included within the remaining budget for other services and therefore savings would need to be found from non-statutory services which therefore left a smaller budget from which to find the savings.  The Head of Finance informed the Committee that most Council services were statutory; however, they would need to deliver services in a totally different way. 

 

Mr. Huw Isaac, the Head of Performance and Development, informed the Committee that the Authority had a stark financial picture in front of it for the next 10 years.  The Reshaping Services report had been considered by Cabinet on the 11th August 2014 and it had been agreed in principle to institute a Reshaping Services strategy and change programme and to refer the report to the Community Liaison Committee for consultation. He stated that the main aim of this Special Community Liaison Committee meeting was to receive the views of the Town and Community Councils with regard to the current position and also how they might be able to get involved to work through the problems resulting from the budgetary issues.  He further informed the Committee that a variety of stakeholders had been approached for their views, including the Local Service Board, Vale Centre for Voluntary Services and that the Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee would also receive the report for their views as would Trade Unions and staff. 

 

The Committee was presented with the conventional options Councils employed for making savings which included:

 

          Efficiencies

          Effectiveness – which involved questioning how the Authority was providing services

          Income generation – which involved ascertaining whether services had scope for the generation of revenue

          Targeted cuts and decommissioning – these had not been identified as yet.

 

The Committee was informed about alternative delivery models which included:

 

           Joint provision with other public sector bodies

           Delivery by external partners

           Council owned companies

-           joint ventures

-           trading companies

-           employee / community owned companies

           Co-production.

 

The Council was already involved with joint provision for services which included the Joint Education Service, Prosiect Gwyrdd and the proposed joint Regulatory Services with Cardiff Council and Bridgend County Borough Council. 

 

The Committee was informed that the Authority already had experience of outsourcing certain services to external partners, such as the leisure centres to Parkwood and had transferred Dyffryn House to an external partner, the National Trust.

 

The Committee was informed that Council owned companies would involve the splitting off of a Council service from its parent, making it a separate, stand-alone company and staff would transfer to the new company.  The main variants of Council owned companies were:

 

          Joint ventures

         Local Authority owned companies

          Employee / community owned companies

          Privately owned companies.

 

Joint ventures involved the Council and a private sector company forming a newly jointly owned company to sell and deliver a service.  They were used as a means of injecting significant funding to support rapid growth in the business, in return for an ownership stake.

 

Local Authority trading companies were set up with the express purpose of entering into contracts with the public or private sectors and acting as an “incubatorâ€, run on commercial lines but under the protection of the Council.  In this way a service could be nurtured and allowed to develop by the Council before being fully exposed to the rigours of the commercial world.

 

Employee / community owned companies were owned by employees and their profits were redistributed to employees and the community.  Mutuals and co-operatives were examples of these kinds of companies.  The Head of Performance and Development informed the Committee that co-production involved the Council working with communities to deliver the services.

 

The Head of Performance and Development set out the types of roles Town and Community Councils might play in the Reshaping Services programme.  The various roles included:

 

          Improving community access to and satisfaction with services

          Providing greater local influence over services

          Maintaining and enhancing standards

          Enhancing the role of local Councils in their communities

          Generating greater community pride in local areas

          Promoting engagement of local communities in local government

          Achieving value for money.

 

He further informed the Committee with regard to the options for Town and Community Councils’ involvement in the Reshaping Service programme, which included:

 

          Reporting on existing service delivery

          Joint delivery / enhancing a service

         Delegation of service delivery

          Transfer of a service (if the Vale Council decided to scale down or delete a service).

 

He said that the information within the presentation were not proposals but indications and suggestions of ways to overcome the challenges resulting from the budgetary situation. 

 

Various services were put forward as possible services which could be provided either in full or part by the Town and Community Councils;  which included amongst others, fly tipping, gully cleaning, winter maintenance on some roads, street cleansing, litter picking and public conveniences.   It was reiterated that these were just possible areas of service delivery which would require the attention of the Town and Community Councils and also sought the views of the Town and Community Councils on the various options available. 

 

The next steps for the Reshaping Services programme were outlined, which firstly involved baseline assessments for all Council services which effectively involved a stock take for each service area along with an evaluation to assess whether the service was currently effective and also how services could potentially be delivered in the future to attain the necessary savings.  Following on from the baseline assessments there would be the first tranche of service reviews which would include a more detailed review of the service areas to be completed by March 2015.  These reviews would lead into a rolling programme of changes with a timescale of three to five years. 

 

Following on from the presentation, the Chairman opened up the debate for questions from the Town and Community Councils.  A representative from Barry Town Council informed the Committee that some time ago Barry Town Council had been keen to take over a couple of parks in the town, however, this had been unsuccessful as it was a political issue and received officer resistance.  The representative further stated that Barry Town Council had been working in partnership on the pop up library and the Cemetery Approach scheme; however, in order to initiate schemes, they had needed to approach the Council to arrange a meeting with the Leader of the Vale of Glamorgan Council and expressed the view that this process would not work with regard to Reshaping Services programme if all Town and Community Councils required a meeting with the Council Leader.  The representative stated that the project would require appropriate processes and procedures in place with involvement of Cabinet Members and the hostility of officers would need to be addressed.

 

In response, The Head of Performance and Development stated that the four main Town Councils had been invited to meetings with the Leader and the Managing Director on 24th September 2014.  Furthermore, there was a commitment to take the concerns of Town and Community Councils seriously and a programme would be required to deal with any issues. 

 

The Chairman, in response, stated that this Administration had an open door policy and that the Managing Director, two Heads of Service and all Directors were in full support of the new approach, however admitted that it was an uncomfortable learning curve.  The Chairman confirmed that he would take these concerns back to the Leader. 

 

A Member of the Vale of Glamorgan Council expressed the view that they reinforced the message given by the Head of Improvement and Development and the Head of Finance and stated that two thirds of the Authority’s budget was already taken, which compounded the savings issue, therefore the restructure issue needed to be addressed.  Furthermore, he stated that the Vale of Glamorgan Council had no other options other than to try to work with Town and Community Councils or not to deliver services.  He stated that the current financial situation was the worst in his experience and that the Council needed to disseminate this message to Vale of Glamorgan communities and the Council needed to work with Town and Community Councils and the Voluntary Sector. 

 

The representative from Cowbridge with Llanblethian Town Council stated that the whole review was a continuation of a process to pass off services to Town and Community Councils, however it seemed to not take into account that Town and Community Councillors were unpaid volunteers and it seemed unreasonable to expect this.  In response the Chairman stated that he recognised that the smaller Town and Community Councils may not be able to provide certain services due to the expense of providing the services, however the programme would be about providing what is sensible for each Town and Community Council. 

 

A Member of the Vale of Glamorgan Council stated that there was still an issue remaining with regards to culture and provided an example with regard to Peterston-Super-Ely Community Council, which had wanted to take responsibility for their playing fields, however it had taken a year to arrange a meeting with the Director and relevant Cabinet Member.  The Member stated that there needed to be a culture change from the bottom in order for the change programme to work successfully. 

 

A Member of the Vale of Glamorgan Council stated that they understood the reasoning for commencing with the larger Town and Community Councils as their budgets were useful, however, it was being done on a piecemeal basis, the towns were spread out geographically and certain towns did not have a community council at all, therefore their services were still provided by the Vale of Glamorgan Council.  The Member expressed concerns with regard to the increases in Council tax which had led to rises in the precept for Barry Town Council, which therefore meant it made less money than the Vale of Glamorgan Council.  Furthermore, if Barry Town Council was required to take on more services in the future this could be done if they received more money and therefore could save more services.  He expressed further concern with regard to some Community Councils not increasing their precepts, which meant they were making a loss. 

 

In response the Chairman stated that he accepted the point with regard to the precepts of Town and Community Councils and advised that this change programme was new to everyone involved, however he would raise the issues with the Leader and agreed that a cultural change needed to happen. 

 

A Member of the Vale of Glamorgan Council stated that the Reshaping Services change programme needed to be communicated effectively and that there were capacity issues which needed to be addressed as certain functions were already carried out by Town and Community Councils, however, he expressed concerns as to whether the services were being provided effectively.  He further stated that all community groups should be involved with the change programme and that there was an issue that some communities did not have a Council and that Vale of Glamorgan Council Members that attended Town and Community Council meetings needed to be honest with the public and ensure that all stakeholders are involved in the process.

 

The representative from Penarth Town Council  asserted that the Vale of Glamorgan should be commended for systematically approaching these issues and that these and Charter discussions had been going on for some time in England whereas in Wales there seemed to be an ad hoc or hurried approach.  The representative raised the issue of the need for external advice with regard to the change programme and that the huge issue of capacity had been raised at the meeting of One Voice Wales and felt that the WLGA needed to treat this issue more seriously.  The Penarth Town Council representative further stated that Penarth Town Council would take a positive, qualified approach and reiterated that a systematic approach would be needed for the change programme and external advice was required for both the Vale of Glamorgan Council and Town and Community Councils and that this advice was definitely needed with regard to the alternative service delivery models. 

 

In response to this, the Chairman informed the Committee that officers and Members involved with the Library Service review had made visits to English Councils to look at the models for alternative service delivery and stated that the Vale of Glamorgan Council was doing this to try and sustain the service in the long term and that it was hoping to learn from best practice rather than rushing the review. 

 

A Member of the Vale of Glamorgan Council spoke on the issue of Town and Community Councils providing services, for example the upkeep of public toilets, and stated that the Authority would need to look at the cost of local authorities and Town and Community Councils running the services and that it may be cheaper for a local authority to run certain services and Town and Community Councils may need to pay into a fund for these services.

 

In response another Member of the Vale of Glamorgan Council stated that certain Councillors for rural Councils were required to cover large areas and perhaps they could take over certain services, particularly as they would have an attachment to their areas and stated that possibly these services could be provided on a commercial basis as had been done in England.  This Member suggested that an audit was needed which would involve asking Town and Community Councils which services they would be capable of taking on what they would want from this change programme. 

 

The representative from Penarth Town Council stated that a more structured approach would be required and the Chairman stated that the aim of the meeting was to receive views form the Committee which could in turn go to Cabinet and provide an explanation of where the Town and Community Councils stood with regard to the Reshaping Services programme.

 

The representative from Llanfair Community Council raised concerns with regard to the size of some of the rural Community Councils and stated that they could possibly look at some of the smaller Councils merging and also raised the issue of the size of the Vale of Glamorgan Council and whether it should be amalgamated with other local authorities.

 

In response the Chairman stated that the issue of Town and Community Councils merging had been included within the Williams Commission Report and that a cross-party motion had been raised at Council, that the Vale of Glamorgan Council should remain as a stand-alone Authority, and that concerns had been raised about merging with Cardiff County Council.  He further stated that the Wales Audit Office report for Cardiff County Council had raised major issues. The Chairman further informed the Committee that the First Minister had advised that there would be no changes with regard to local government until after the 2016 elections; however the Vale of Glamorgan Council needed to change its services now. 

 

The representative from Llanmaes Community Council stated that the real savings would be found with shared services and partners across local authorities and in response, the Chairman stated that the Authority was looking at more collaborative projects.  The Council was already involved in joint projects such as the joint education service, the upcoming joint regulatory services project, adoption services and Prosiect Gwyrdd.  The Chairman further informed the Committee that if every Town and Community Council took on services, for example grass cutting, there could be significant savings.  However, he agreed with the point made with regard to larger savings to be made with shared services.

 

The representative from Llandough Community Council stated that although it had been advised that no specific plans had been made with regard to savings, there were pages of figures contained within the Medium Term Financial Plan and in response to this, the Head of Finance stated that in relation to the savings agenda, it had been running for several years and was now looking ahead to the next three years with £18m worth of savings being identified, however, these had not yet been delivered and a further £14m still needed to be identified.  He further stated that the Authority would also need to look to its partners to investigate ways of delivering the savings agenda. 

 

The Member from St. Athan Community Council stated that many of the Vale of Glamorgan Community Councils are extremely small and there were other issues involved with the Reshaping Services programme that needed to be considered such as health and safety and staffing issues as many clerks worked part time. 

 

In response the Chairman stated that the Authority was not looking at enforcing services on Town and Community Councils, it was more about engagement and the wider discussions to be held with regards to the Reshaping Services programme.  Furthermore, he informed the Committee that it was about Town and Community Councils advising whether they were able to support a particular service or part of a service, as had taken place with the pop-up library service being run by Barry Town Council.  He advised that he accepted that some things might not be possible; however, if services were to be provided by Town and Community Councils, perhaps the Authority could provide regulatory support.

 

The Member from Penarth Town Council stated that there was currently a White Paper on the Williams Report which made reference to future involvement of Town and Community Councils in local government and advised that there was a further report coming out in October 2014 and queried whether this Committee’s views would be incorporated into this consultation. 

 

A Member of the Vale of Glamorgan Council expressed concern that some of the smaller rural Community Councils advised that they did not run any services and if this was the case stated if they should consider merging with other Community or Town Councils or increasing their precepts. 

 

A Member of the Vale of Glamorgan Council stated that services may not need to be carried out as they currently are, for example grass cutting, as if this was not carried out in certain areas there could be significant savings made and it would also be beneficial to wild flora and fauna. There needed to be a culture change and this message needed to be disseminated into the Vale of Glamorgan communities.

 

Following discussion of the Reshaping Services programme, the financial context of the Reshaping Services programme and the presentation given to the Committee, it was

 

AGREED –

 

(1)      T H A T the contents of the Reshaping Services report and the presentation given to the Committee be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T it was the wish of the Committee that an audit is undertaken of the services currently provided by the Town and Community Councils across the Vale of Glamorgan and also that a formal request is made as to what services, if any, they would look to take on in the future.

 

(3)       T H A T the views of the Community Liaison Committee and Town and Community Council representatives be forwarded to Cabinet for their consideration.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To have regard to the content of the report and presentation.

 

(2)       In order that the Vale of Glamorgan Council is able to assess the current situation with regard to services currently provided by Town and Community Councils across the Vale of Glamorgan and also to assess which services, if any, they would be able to provide in the future.

 

(3)       In order that an exchange of views can be maintained.

 

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Cabinet having considered the above recommendations from the Community Liaison Committee

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted and the comments from the Community Liaison Committee be incorporated and considered in a further report to Cabinet to be presented in November 2014.  

 

Reason for decision

 

To consider the comments from the Community Liaison Committee.

 

 

C2488                        RESHAPING SERVICES – A NEW CHANGE PROGRAMME FOR THE COUNCIL (REF) -          

 

The Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee on 23 September, 2014 considered the above report.

 

The contents of the draft Medium Term Financial Plan 2014/15 - 2017/18 report; was endorsed by Cabinet at a meeting on the 11th August, 2014 and was included within the documentation received by the Committee prior to the meeting.  The Head of Finance informed the Committee that the Medium Term Financial Plan was not a budget but the plan based on the best available information.  The purpose of the plan was to link the Council’s strategic planning process with the budget process and to ensure consistency between them.  It was a mechanism that attempted to match future predicted resources and expenditure, identify potential shortfalls and provide the financial framework for the next 3-5 years.  He further confirmed that it was not a budget setting process that allocated detailed budgets for services. Its purpose was to inform Members and to suggest a way of dealing with the future financial pressures facing the Council.

 

The Head of Finance informed the Committee that three quarters of the Vale of Glamorgan Council’s net funding came from Welsh Government and the other quarter from Council Tax.  Previous assumptions regarding future funding settlements from Welsh Government had been revised following a letter issued in June 2014 by the Minister for Local Government and Government Business to all Welsh Local Authorities.  The letter raised the prospect of the 2015/16 assessment being a reduction of up to 4.5% in cash terms.  The indicative figure for the Vale for 2015/16 had previously been advised as a reduction of 1.64% with each 1% additional reduction equating to approximately £1.5m less funding.  Furthermore, he informed the Committee that the Minister had stated that local authorities should assume that current trends in local government funding would continue and that local authorities should scenario plan for a range of challenging settlements beyond 2015/16.  The Head of Finance informed the Committee that the latest Medium Term Financial Plan had subsequently been based on the assumption of varying settlements from Welsh Government, of decreases of 4.5% in cash terms in 2015/16, a further 4% reduction in 2016/17 and 2% reduction in 2017/18.

 

The Head of Finance informed the Committee that a variety of legislative, demographic and other issues would have an impact on the Medium Term Financial Plan and that these would have financial consequences and that the financial pressures could possibly be understated.  The Head of Finance provided the financial context for the Reshaping Services Programme and advised the Committee that some £32.4m of savings needed to be found over the next three years, of which £18m had been identified, however, these had not yet been implemented.  There was therefore a £14m shortfall in the savings targets.  The Head of Finance further informed the Committee that the figures contained within the Medium Term Financial Plan were based on assumptions and the best available information at the time.  The Council would need to wait until they received their settlement and would continue to work closely with the WLGA. 

 

The Head of Finance informed the Committee that £61m worth of savings were required over eight year period from 2010-2018, which excluded schools.  The Welsh Government had set a minimum funding commitment for Education, and the schools’ budget represented 37% of the overall Council budget.  The Vale of Glamorgan Council ranked 20th out of the 22 Welsh authorities for funding per head of population and that the Council’s current Band D Council Tax was below the Welsh average at £1,029.42. 

 

The Committee was shown a graph which had been modelled by the Welsh Local Government Association to illustrate the impact of the level of funding reduction, if Welsh Government continued to require protection for Education and a possible level of protection for Social Services.  The graph further illustrated that the full burden of the budget reductions would fall on other services which included many statutory services, therefore ‘business as usual’ was not an option, however, current way of business could not continue, however, there would be opportunities within the change programme which included investigating the way in which the Council works and delivers its services. 

 

Following the presentation from the Head of Finance, a Member stated that Members of the Vale of Glamorgan Council had received the Reshaping Services Programme briefing and also received the report at Scrutiny Committees; therefore they had been given the opportunity to make their comments and it was important that the Voluntary Sector were now provided with the opportunity to put forward their views on this programme.

 

The Head of Performance and Development informed the Committee that the Reshaping Services Change Programme was in response to the Council’s dire financial situation and that the Authority would need to look at new ways of progressing as a Council.  The Reshaping Services report had been considered by Cabinet on the 11th August 2014 and it had been agreed in principle to institute a Reshaping Services strategy and change programme and to refer the report for consultation purposes to the Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee.

 

The Head of Performance and Development informed the Committee of the conventional options for savings that were normally employed by Councils which included the following:

 

·                Efficiencies

·                Effectiveness - which involved questioning how the authority was providing services

·                Income generation - which involved ascertaining whether services had scope for the generation of revenue

·                Targeted cuts and decommissioning - these had not been identified as yet.

 

The Committee was informed about alternative delivery models which included:

 

·                  Joint provision with other public sector bodies

·                  Delivery by external partners

·                  Council owed companies

-        Joint ventures

-        Trading companies

-        Employee / community owned companies

·                Co-production.

 

The Council was already involved with joint provision for services which included the Joint Education Service, Prosiect Gwyrdd and the proposed joint Regulatory Services with Cardiff Council and Bridgend County Borough Council.  He confirmed that public sector bodies were already in dialogue with each other about how to deal with joint provision of services and provide services more effectively and efficiently. 

 

The Committee was informed that the Authority already had experience of outsourcing certain services to external partners, such as the leisure centres to Parkwood and had transferred Dyffryn House to an external partner, the National Trust.

 

The Committee was informed that Council owned companies would involve the splitting off of a Council service from its parent, making it a separate, stand-alone company and staff would transfer to the new company.  The main variants of Council owned companies were:

 

·                Joint Ventures

·                Local Authority owned companies

·                Employee / community owned companies

·                Privately owned companies.

 

Joint ventures involved the Council and a private sector company forming a newly jointly owned company to sell and deliver a service.  They were used as a means of injecting significant funding to support rapid growth in the business, in return for an ownership stake. 

 

Local authority trading companies were set up with the express purpose of entering into contracts with the public or private sectors and acting as an ‘incubator’, run on commercial lines but under the protection of the Council.  In this way a service could be nurtured and allowed to develop by the Council before being fully exposed to the rigours of the commercial world. 

 

Employee / community owned companies were owned by employees and their profits were redistributed to employees and the community.  Mutuals and Co-operatives were examples of these kinds of companies.  The Head of Performance and Development informed the Committee that the Authority was starting to look at aspects of co-production.

 

The Committee was informed of the pros and cons of Council owned companies.  The main positives were that they would deliver cost savings by introducing a commercial discipline, the companies would be able to invest, there would be more flexibility and adaptability within the services and the company would have the ability to trade commercially and the Council would remain involved strategically, but not operationally.

 

The advantages of Mutuals and Co-operatives would be that there would be greater employee motivation and satisfaction due to self-determination.  Furthermore, there would be lower absentee levels and greater community satisfaction.  These companies were able to focus on citizen priorities and the Council would be on-board and retain a stake in the operations. 

 

The downside of Council owned companies was that the Council would lose operational control, there could possibly be a lack of entrepreneurial enthusiasm in local authorities as well as the skills needed to set up a business.  Furthermore, there could be an impact on pay, terms and conditions and pensions of staff and possible service fragmentation, there was also a lack of clear legislation on these companies, particularly for Co-operatives and Mutuals.

 

The Head of Performance and Development informed the Committee that co-production was not a vehicle for service development but was a set of values.  He informed the Committee of a definition from the Wales Council for Voluntary Action (WCVA) which stated that co-production was:

 

“Seeing people and communities as assets and equals in the design and delivery of services.  Services are built around the person and community creating opportunities for engage more actively in the community in which they live. 

 

Co-production unlocks the potential resources of time, money and expertise to combine with and add to state funding so that state resources are used to enable and maximise the citizen and community action, social capital and care.â€

 

Following the presentation the Chairman asked for questions from Members of the Committee.  A Member of the Vale of Glamorgan Council stated that Wales had been underfunded for some time and this was becoming worse due to the level of the cuts.  The Member asked what the delivery timetable was for the Reshaping Services programme, which services the Authority was looking to possibly outsource and how would this programme affect the voluntary sector.  In response the Head of Performance and Development stated that there were several stages involved with the timescale for the Change Programme and that the first stage was to raise awareness of the programme itself.  The Reshaping Services Programme was currently in the consultation phase and the report had been taken to the Local Service Board, the Community Liaison Committee and the Council was also consulting with Trade Unions.  He advised that the main aim at this stage was to inform people and help them understand the current financial position and gave an assurance that any proposals would be taken seriously. 

 

The timescale for the Change Programme was that in autumn 2014 a substantive strategy would be taken to Cabinet.  This would be followed by engagement with and the establishment of a governance structure.  He informed the Committee that baseline assessments of services were being carried out to identify possible problems, the effectiveness of services and also to identify ways of delivering services differently.  Following the baseline assessments, the assessments would be analysed with a view to looking at and identifying possible service reviews to initiate.  The baseline assessments and service reviews would be completed by April 2015 and the Change Programme would last between three and five years.  The Head of Performance and Development further informed the Committee that he wanted to engage with the voluntary sector to take things forward.

 

Following the presentation, Rachel Connor, Executive Director of the Vale Centre for Voluntary Services (VCVS), presented the initial response of the Third Sector to the Reshaping Services Change Programme, copies of which were circulated at the meeting.  Ms. Connor informed the Committee that they had received a briefing from the Head of Performance and Development and the Head of Human Resources on the change programme and that the attendees had been very optimistic.

 

Following the presentation of the Cabinet paper on Reshaping Services at the Local Service Board in August, VCVS held a briefing event to engage the Third Sector in looking at how they might input to this complex scenario.

 

Ms. Connor stated that it had been noted that the Reshaping Services agenda outlined the need to consider alternative delivery models for services and that the Third Sector was well placed to play a role in these discussions, given its experience in innovative design and delivery, flexibility and adaptability to change.  However, ongoing conversations would need to look not just at what was currently being provided and how best to provide that, but also to consider the need to do different things.  This required looking at what was needed, why it was needed and who could deliver the services.  Ms. Connor stated that the result might be not only a move to different providers of current services, but also encompass the development of different services delivered by a range of providers.  An example of this was the provision of residential care.  This could be looked at differently in terms of the quality of the offer and there was a role for the Third Sector in providing quality residential care on a different, not for profit model.

 

The Committee was informed that there were a number of important issues to consider; which included the costs of developing different models, which could not be borne by the Third Sector alone.  Over the last few years, the Third Sector locally had lost resources and therefore capacity and faced increased competition for external funding from sources such as the Lottery.  Ms. Connor stated that a move to different models of service, delivered by the Third Sector, must include some longer term commitment from the Vale of Glamorgan Council to the Third Sector organisations involved.  Furthermore, there was also the issue of the public sector moving to a function which was primarily about managing contracts and relationships.  As more services were moved to other providers, the safety net function of local authorities would be diluted and disappear.  An example was given of a residential care home which if primarily delivered by the private sector; and the provider decided to close down, what role the local authority would have in ensuring the safety and wellbeing of the residents.

 

Ms. Connor informed the Committee with regard to what the Third Sector would need to be able to contribute to the Reshaping Services programme. The initial thoughts were that involvement in discussions about Reshaping Services from the beginning would support the Third Sector contribution.  A better understanding of the range of Council services would help Third Sector services identify the areas where they may be able to deliver.  It would help the Third Sector take a broader look beyond what they currently provided.

 

There were a number of Third Sector services which were currently being funded by the Council, but which potentially faced funding reductions.  These services might well be the kinds of services which Reshaping Services was aiming to achieve.

 

The Third Sector currently played a vital role in promoting health and wellbeing and as such contributed both to the public health agenda and to legislation such as the Future Generations Bill.  The preventative nature of these services, which saved future, more costly interventions from taking place, needed to be considered.

 

Ms. Connor informed the Committee that some Third Sector organisations had already established trading and enterprise companies which could potentially take on a range of service provision, if adequately resourced.

 

An identified person within the Council who could liaise with the Third Sector about proposals submitted would help facilitate conversations and they could ensure that other Council staff were involved in discussions as appropriate.

 

The Committee was informed that VCVS and the wider Third Sector were keen to work with the Council to put in place a process whereby Expressions of Interest in providing services could be submitted, discussed and evaluated and that Third Sector organisations were being encouraged to think outside their normal areas of delivery.

 

Ms. Connor confirmed that VCVS would support the Reshaping Services strategy, with support from Third Sector Representatives, drawn from a range of Third Sector organisations and that resources would be required to support this increased activity.

 

Ms. Connor expressed concern that competitive tendering was not well suited to smaller, local Third Sector groups or to supporting co-production on a local basis.  A preferred providers list would ensure that local Third Sector groups, which provided local services and supported co-production on a local community basis, were supported to bid for statutory funding.  Where this was not possible or the size of the contract would suggest broader appeal from larger organisations, then the weighting in the score card for evaluation should take 'co-production’ more into account.  Ms. Connor also advised that there could be other models of commissioning which were alternative to either contracts or grants, and which might work better with new models of service.

 

Ms. Connor informed the Committee with regard to other areas for consideration, which included apprising them that there was a range of help available via Wales Co-operative Centre, Co-production Wales and Social Board Wales, which could be utilised.  There needed to be a way of encouraging private sector investment, as it might not be easy to pull in private capital to support new models of service delivery, unless there was a commercial gain involved.

 

New models of service delivery might require looking at new roles, rather than perpetuating traditional health and social care roles. Discussions about Reshaping Services would benefit from involving Health Board colleagues as investment in social services had an impact on use of health services.

 

The proposed merger of local authorities was due to take place by 2020 and a legacy statement detailing Third Sector funding at the time of merger would provide stability to the organisations funded.

 

Following the presentation of Ms. Connor’s report, a Member stated that the Authority would need to look at all service areas, however the Local Authority would need to maintain some overall control of these services.  Members further expressed concern that the Council’s reserves could be at a minimum by 2018/19 and therefore a level of urgency was required in delivering the Reshaping Services agenda. 

 

A Member thanked Ms. Connor for her report and expressed concern with regards to commissioning and the danger of the Third Sector being out-bid and that it was important to remember the central nature of services and that people and services were involved and co-production was central to this.  The Member also stated that the Reshaping Services programme should not be rushed without ensuring that the right services were provided at the end of it, however, appreciated that it was a difficult situation as the Authority was also dealing with the possibility of mergers concurrently.

 

A Member expressed the view that there needed to be a lot of consultation with stakeholders and concurred that the change programme should not be rushed and asked whether the Authority could look to well-run establishments for ideas of best practice and stated that they would like to maintain the ethos of the way services and establishments were currently run.

 

Ms. Connor confirmed that the request for a nominated officer could assist with the co-ordination of the Change Programme across the Authority and facilitate liaisons with various Third Sector bodies, however the officer would need to be the right point of contact and that the right representatives would also need to be identified within the Third Sector to review services.

 

The Chairman stated that the key element within the Change Programme was effective communication.  A Member expressed the view that joint ventures and stand-alone companies had more potential and had improved performance and income streams and that these could also be established with other authorities.  Furthermore, he stated that links could be made with outside sectors, including the Third Sector, with a view to income generation. 

 

The representative from Cardiff and the Vale University Health Board informed the Committee that the Health Service was not in a dissimilar situation to local authorities and would embrace the Reshaping Services agenda, however, it was important that all parties worked together and also considered any possible negative impact on the Health Service and advised that they would like to build upon the work that had been started such as the integrated health work streams.  In response to this, a Member stated that this was why it was important that Third Sector bodies were involved from the outset of the programme and that any change in services added to the role currently provided by the Health Services. 

 

Following consideration of the Reshaping Services report and the Third Sector response the Committee

 

AGREED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the Reshaping Services report and the presentation given to the Committee be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T it be recognised that the Third Sector were keen to engage in meaningful conversations about any proposals with the aim of contributing to Reshaping Services.

 

(3)       T H A T involvement in discussions about Reshaping Services from the beginning would support the Third Sector contribution.

 

(4)       T H A T having an identified person within the Council to liaise with the Third Sector about proposals submitted would help facilitate those conversations and they could ensure that other Council staff were involved in discussions as appropriate.

 

(5)       T H A T additional resources to enable the Third Sector to participate fully in the co-production and planning involved in this initiative would be required.

 

(6)       T H A T Cabinet be informed of the above.

 

Reason for Recommendations

 

(1)       To have regard to the content of the report and presentation.

 

(2-6)    To ensure that Reshaping Services has the greatest opportunity for success.

 

----------------------------------------------

 

Cabinet having considered the recommendations from the Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted and the comments from the Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee be incorporated and considered in a further report to Cabinet to be presented in November 2014. 

 

Reason for decision

 

To consider the comments from the Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee.

 

 

C2489                        VALE YOUTH FORUM - END OF PROJECT REPORT (REF) -

 

The Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee on 23 September, 2014 considered the above report.

 

The Committee received a report which contained information on the work of the Vale Youth Forum (“the Forumâ€) funded via the Vale Voluntary Action Scheme (VAS). 

 

The Committee was informed that 2013/14 had been the third and final year of VAS funding for the Forum.  The aim over the three years had been to develop the Forum into a more sustainable and established organisation of young people that represented their communities both in and out of school and to develop a Vale Youth Council, democratically elected to debate, influence and scrutinise issues which directly affected young people within the Vale of Glamorgan.

 

The Vale Centre for Voluntary Services (VCVS) was pleased to report that this goal had been successfully achieved.  Within the report presented to the Committee were the statistics for the Forum and also illustrated the work that the Forum had carried out in reaching new members from across the Vale of Glamorgan, from areas ranging from Colwinston and Wick through Barry, Dinas Powys and Penarth and involving young people from local schools, Youth Service provision, Community First provision and Third Sector youth provision.  The work with youth provision included organisations such as Young Carers, Penarth Youth Projects Disability Teen Scheme and United Youth Club for young people with Asperger Syndrome and Higher Functioning Autism and Vale People First. 

 

The report detailed the following information:

 

           The Forum had met 25 times since October, 2013 and had 51 new members

           All Forum members were signed up to the Millennium Volunteer or Star Volunteer Awards and certificates for their volunteer hours would be awarded to the young people at their AGM in November.

           The Forum had held two Forum Recruitment Events outside of Schools for Youth Provisions and Voluntary Agencies and two Meet and Greet Events with the new members

           The Forum had undertaken 15 Training Workshops, including two Saturday training days

           The Forum included members from:

Voluntary Youth Provisions including:

 

-           Young Carers

-           Vale People First

-           Penarth Youth Project United Youth Club

-           Penarth Youth Project Disability Teen Scheme

-           Action for Children

-           Wick Youth Club

-           Army Cadets

 

Vale of Glamorgan Schools including:

 

-           Cowbridge Comprehensive

-           Ashgrove School

-           Ysgol Gyfun Bro Morgannwg

-           St. Richard Gwyn R/C School

-           Stanwell Comprehensive

-           Barry Comprehensive

-           Bryn Hafren Comprehensive

 

Vale Youth Service Provisions

 

-           The Hub Youth Provision

-           Young Inspectors

 

           Recruited the first Youth Councillors and delivered the first Youth Cabinet in the Vale of Glamorgan.

 

The Forum also had “independent†young members, who had not been voted directly from an organisation, but who felt their input for their area would be beneficial to their area / community.

 

The Committee was informed that it had been a busy and hugely successful year for the Forum members. In addition to their recruitment and training and the work of the Forum, it had been nominated at the Vale of Glamorgan Youth Awards in the Participation Category and was Highly Commended.

 

Candy Srinivas had won the WCVA Young Volunteer of the Year, in part for her

voluntary role as a member of the Forum and as Vice Chair of the Forum.

 

All of the work undertaken by the Forum was underpinned by the National

Children and Young People’s Participation Kite Mark for Wales Award which had been achieved in 2012.  The Committee was also informed that four Forum members represented the Forum on the Welsh Assembly Government’s Funky Dragon Grand Council.

 

Work had continued to raise the profile of the Forum and 15 articles had been produced for the Vale of Glamorgan “Swoosh†website and 12 articles had been printed in the local Vale of Glamorgan papers including the Barry and District, Penarth Times and The Gem.

 

Ms. Connor, Executive Director of the VCVS, stated that the Forum had achieved what they had set out to and the Youth Forum Co-ordinator post had been hosted by the VCVS and helped to access Voluntary Action Scheme funding. 

 

Following the presentation of the report a Member extended congratulations to the Forum on their excellent successes including the Vale Youth Cabinet and asked what the future held with regard to the end of the funding for the project.  In response Ms. Connor informed the Committee that they had been unsuccessful in bidding for funding from People and Places, however advised that they could relook at their bid or participate with the Consortium Development Project with a view to securing funding.  She further informed the Committee that there were a variety of opportunities with regards to funding bids; however as they no longer had a paid employee it would be a lot to ask volunteers to complete a strategy for fundraising. 

 

The Children and Young People’s Partnership Manager, stated that the Youth Service had also released an officer to work with the Youth Cabinet and that this funding would continue until March 2015 or possibly until June/July 2015, however, they would need to approach the Trustees with regards to a way forward.  He further stated that funding streams had changed and that the Youth Service may need to pick up this work area, however, they would continue to struggle. 

 

Following the presentation of the report it was

 

AGREED –

 

(1)       T H A T the Committee noted the content of the report.

 

(2)       T H A T the report be recommended to Cabinet for information.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To have regard to the content of the report.

 

(2)       To apprise Cabinet of the work of the Vale Youth Forum.

 

----------------------------------------------

 

 

Cabinet, having considered the above recommendations from the Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee.

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the contents of the report.

 

 

C2490                        INDIVIDUAL SCHOOL PROGRESS MEETING – EAGLESWELL (REF) –

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Lifelong Learning) on 22 September, 2014 considered the above report of the Director of Learning and Skills.    

 

The Chairman advised the Scrutiny Committee of the progress meeting that had been held at Eagleswell Primary School by a Panel of three Members of the Committee, namely Councillor N.P. Hodges (Chairman of the Panel), Councillor Mrs. M.E.J. Birch and Mr. L. Kellaway, with Councillor C.P.J. Elmore, Mrs. K. Jacobs (Acting Head), Mrs. J. Vickers (Chairman of Governors), Mr. D. Mutlow (School Governor), Mrs. J. Hill (Director of Learning and Skills), Mrs. L. Jones (Head of School Improvement and Inclusion at the time), Mr. J. Commissiong (Challenge Advisor) and Mr. G.J. Davies (Scrutiny Support Officer) in attendance.

 

The report outlined that one of the reasons for the visit was that, following the Estyn inspection in February 2014, the school had been placed in the follow-up category, stipulating that significant improvement were required.  A Post Inspection Action Plan (PIAP) had been drafted by the school detailing how the school planned to improve and address the recommendations made by Estyn and under statutory powers the Local Authority had appointed two additional governors to the school in order to strengthen the work and support of the Governing Body.  Members were also informed that due to ill health of the substantive Headteacher, an Acting Head had been appointed on an interim basis from May 2014.  Since that date the Director could advise that the substantive Headteacher had recently retired and the Acting Head had been appointed to the position by the school Governing Body up to December 2014. 

 

At the Performance Panel meeting itself the Acting Headteacher had informed the Panel that during the inspection the school had been unable to document and evidence proper teacher planning and, in particular, the issue of teachers’ planning being completed in a retrospective basis.  This had led to concerns amongst Inspectors regarding the role and responsibility of the Senior Leadership Team and in particular regarding the monitoring of teachers’ planning and the ability of the school to progress the development of its pupils. 

 

In order to address the deficiencies in respect of teachers' planning, the school had ensured that planning was undertaken on a forward looking basis, was completed under a new common format and was regularly collected for evaluation.  Teachers now received individual feedback about their planning, which was sent to them in writing.  The Senior Leadership Team (SLT) of the school now regularly monitored teacher planning files and regular discussions were being held between teachers and senior leaders.

 

The Panel had raised concerns regarding the consistent completion of teachers' planning, as some teachers undertook planning on a fortnightly basis while others completed planning weekly. The Panel was also concerned with the reticence of some staff in co-operating with the actions highlighted within the school's PIAP. 

 

In addressing the issues regarding the roles and responsibilities of the Senior Leadership Team, the school had reviewed the structure of the SLT and roles and responsibilities had been defined.  The school at the time was still in the process of finalising the job descriptions for all staff members but advised that this would be concluded by September.  The Chairman of Governors welcomed the appointment of the two new Local Authority Governors and they fully recognised the help and the support that they had brought with them. 

 

In order to improve the standards of extended writing in English and across the curriculum, the school had compiled baseline data for every pupil and  this enabled the school to track and monitor individual progress for each pupil.  The tracking of pupil progress was centred around the 'INCERTS' system with data analysed on a termly basis so as to identify under achieving pupils and the areas where these pupils needed to improve. Intervention strategies for under achieving pupils now included Foundation Leaders meeting with each teacher in order to identify pupils requiring extra support. The school used the Big Write method to analyse the stages of development of pupils, while the introduction of pupil 'I Can' statements was still at an early stage. Teacher feedback marking was inconsistent; this was an area that the Governing Body Monitoring Panel would review and address.  The school had been able to acquire the support of a consultant to review the moderation of writing assessments and the school had also created a portfolio which showed examples of assessments completed by pupils up to Year 6.  An evaluation of the coverage of genres in reading and writing had been undertaken and this had been linked to curriculum plans.  The school had also conducted a staff training session to improve pupils’ sentence, punctuation and letter formation at Foundation Phase. 

 

To address Estyn's recommendation to raise the standards of Welsh at Key Stage 2 the school had undertaken an audit of provision and the representative from the Central South Consortium had been supporting the Learning Support Teacher assigned to Welsh.  A baseline for each pupil had been established in order to provide a proper starting point.  The school had also implemented a 10 minute period per day for the teaching of Welsh and this also included a 'Phrase of the Week'.  To improve curriculum planning the school had undertaken a mapping exercise and this had resulted in additional topics being included where they best fitted in.  There was also a greater level of consideration of Welsh within Maths and literacy and extra training had been provided to teachers and support staff and the Welsh in Education Officer from the Central South Consortium was assisting the school to improve this.  The school had also identified the need to improve teaching assessments as it was considered that these were not substantially robust. 

 

The Panel was advised that to ensure that the Key Stage 2 curriculum met statutory requirements the school had reviewed the literacy and numeracy framework and the cornerstone curriculum which was currently used within the school.  The Learning Support Teacher was actively working on identifying improvements to the curriculum, but it was not at present easy to evidence significant progress.  The school had reviewed long term, medium term and short term planning and a common format for teacher planning was now in place.  The school had also undertaken half term book reviews of literacy and Maths. 

 

Estyn had judged some teaching in the school to be unsatisfactory and the Panel was advised that in order to improve the quality of teaching, the school had looked at its teaching and learning policy and its criteria for evaluating teaching.  A baseline of teaching had been established and the school had been able to analyse the outcomes following the baseline evaluation, which had highlighted strengths and areas requiring improvement.  Support and peer coaching had been reviewed and termly observations and climate walks introduced.

 

The Panel's overall conclusion was that it welcomed the school’s acknowledgement of the need to make substantive changes to address the Estyn recommendations and to make significant improvements.  They noted the plans to address the recommendations, including the analysis of risk and detailed monitoring arrangements.  The school was correct to identify the sickness of the substantive Headteacher as a major risk which would need to be managed actively.  The Local Authority's support plan was comprehensive, included support from the Consortium and the Council and the Panel welcomed the appointment of additional Governors and the positive approach the Chair of Governors of the school had taken to the appointments.  The Panel recognised that there were some examples of early progress to implement the Plan, but they considered that much remained to be done.  The Panel, taking into account the identified risks and the early stage of development, planned to reconvene in the Autumn. 

 

The Chairman, in summing up, advised that, in his view, the school was a good school but could be so much better.  In considering the report reference was made to previous Individual School Progress Panel Meetings that had taken place in secondary schools in the Vale, with Members being advised that two of the schools had received above the minimum expectations that had been recommended for the GCSE results.  The Director advised that with regard to Barry Comprehensive School, she was currently assessing the situation and seeking advice in respect of the way forward and would be apprising Members, in particular those Members of the Panels, in due course.  The Chairman also requested that future dates for re-visits of all Individual School Progress Panels to the schools be arranged as soon as possible in the Autumn term.

 

In response to a request for full details regarding the GCSE results in August for all Secondary schools in the Vale the Director advised that a Cabinet report was currently being prepared and the Chairman asked for a copy of that report to be forwarded to the Scrutiny Committee for consideration.

 

Having considered the report, it was subsequently

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the Individual School Progress Panel findings as detailed in paragraph 18 of the report be accepted.

 

(2)       T H A T a follow up visit to the school by the Panel Members be arranged as soon as possible.

 

(3)       T H A T the report be referred to Cabinet for consideration and approval.

 

(4)       T H A T the Director of Learning and Skills devises a schedule for Individual School Progress Panel Members to revisit Llantwit Major, St. Cyres, Barry Comprehensive and Bryn Hafren.

 

(5)       T H A T the information in relation to the GCSE results for 2013/14 for the Vale of Glamorgan be presented as soon as possible.

  

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To apprise the Committee of the findings of the Performance Panel.

 

(2)       To monitor and undertake a follow up visit.

 

(3)       For Cabinet consideration.

 

(4)       To progress the work of the Performance Panels.

 

(5)       To apprise Members.

 

----------------------------------------------

 

Cabinet, having considered the recommendations from the Scrutiny Committee (Lifelong Learning)

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)          T H A T the Individual School Progress Panel findings as detailed in paragraph 18 of the report be approved.

 

(2)          T H A T it be agreed that a further visit to the school by the Panel Members be arranged as soon as possible.

 

(3)          T H A T a further report be brought back to Cabinet to agree when any future visits to other schools are deemed necessary.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)          To approve the findings of the Performance Panel.

 

(2)          To monitor and undertake a follow up visits.

 

(3)          For Cabinet to agree when visits to other schools are deemed necessary.

 

 

C2491                        COMMUNITY ACTION SELF HELP (CASH) SCHEME 2014/15 (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) -

 

Approval was sought for the awarding of CASH grants for the period 2014/15.

 

Details of the applications received, together with the grants recommended were set out at Appendix A as attached to the report. The scheme's Conditions and Criteria were set out at Appendix B as attached to the report.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision.

 

RESOLVED – T H A T grants be approved as set out in Appendix A as attached to the report.

 

Reason for decision

 

To progress grants in accordance with the approved scheme.

 

 

C2492                        JOINT CCTV OPERATION (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) -

 

Approval was sought to enter into a legal agreement with Bridgend County Borough Council (BCBC) for the provision of a joint CCTV service.

 

As part of this Council’s agile approach to collaborative working, the Council agreed a Memorandum of Understanding with Bridgend County Borough Council in 2011 to explore collaborative working arrangements that improved services for residents and/or delivered financial savings.

 

A Programme Board co-chaired by the Managing Director of the Vale of Glamorgan Council (VOGC) and Chief Executive of Bridgend Council overseeing the delivery of projects, requested that the creation of a joint CCTV monitoring service be investigated.

 

An options appraisal was developed by officers of both Councils and involved contact with South Wales Police and the Community Safety Partnership. Options considered included a reciprocal arrangement for business continuity purposes and a single co-located service.

 

Analysis of the services offered at each existing location revealed that Bridgend Council’s control centre provided a much broader range of services, for example, offering emergency out of hours telephone contact, lone workers, lift monitoring and bollard management. This contrasted with the control centre in Barry which was entirely focused on CCTV monitoring, interaction with South Wales Police and Business Partners and Communities Together (PACT).

 

It would be significantly more difficult, from both an operational and technical perspective, as well as more expensive to relocate these services to Barry.

 

The BCBC service currently employed 9 Full Time Equivalents (FTE) compared to 3 FTE at the Vale of Glamorgan. Location of the service in Bridgend would, overall, mean less staff disruption

 

The control room in Bridgend was currently operating in a self-contained environment which provided for a high level of flexibility and access control. Whilst the Barry centre complied with statutory requirements, location in a shared office environment with Contact OneVale left little flexibility for development where office space was restricted.

 

For these reasons the proposal was to locate the shared control room at the existing Bridgend site.

 

The total capital cost of technical integration would be £80,250. A breakdown of costs was shown in Appendix A, as attached to the report. 

 

At the meeting the Deputy Leader noted concerns that Cabinet had received on the provision of a joint CCTV service from the Business PACT.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision.

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)          T H A T the financial business case as set out in the report be endorsed and approved.

 

(2)          T H A T delegated authority be given to the Managing Director, in consultation with the Leader of the Council, to finalise the arrangements (including cost apportionment and services to be provided) for the commissioning of a joint CCTV service.

 

(3)          T H A T subject to resolutions 1 and 2 above, a legal partnership agreement based on Section 101/102 of the Local Government Act 1972 be entered into with Bridgend County Borough Council for provision of the joint  CCTV service.

 

(4)          T H A T the Council works closely with the South Wales Police and the Business PACT  to ensure that a smooth transition of the service takes place.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1-3)    To ensure that the service was maintained, business resilience was improved and cash savings realised, at a time of unprecedented budget pressures.

 

(4)       To ensure that a smooth transition of the service took place.

 

           

C2493                        CENTRAL SOUTH CONSORTIUM LEGAL AGREEMENT (CS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – LIFELONG LEARNING) -

 

Approval was sought to enter into a new School Improvement Services legal agreement for the Central South Consortium.

 

Local Authorities across Wales established Consortium arrangements for delivery of Education services.  The focus of these services was on the Central South Consortium delivery of school improvement services.

 

The Central South Consortium comprised Bridgend, Cardiff, Merthyr Tydfil, Rhondda Cynon Taff and Vale of Glamorgan Councils.

 

At the meeting on 21 October, 2013 Cabinet agreed a legal agreement for the Central South Consortium comprising two parts: the joint education service providing statutory school improvement activities on behalf of local authorities and, the traded LINKS service providing training, development and support activities funded in the main through delegated school budgets and grant income.

 

The Joint Committee of the Consortium agreed a business plan for the current year that was consistent with the National Model: this plan was endorsed by Cabinet at the meeting on 12 May, 2014.

 

Cabinet was being asked to agree entry into a new legal agreement which was consistent with the National Model and business plan.

 

A key change in the New Agreement was the role of the Executive Board, which advised the Joint Committee on operational delivery of the joint service, as guided by the steering groups and whose role included to manage, oversee and support the service.

 

Following the publication of the Government's national model, Central South Consortium produced a Business Plan which set out the vision priorities and targets for the region.  It established the working arrangements of the consortium and also allowed for the agreement of separate annexes with each authority to govern the separate commissioning arrangements in place in each case.  The Business Plan confirmed the termination of the LINKS Service and also confirmed the governance model for the consortium.

 

The consortium model would be governed by a Joint Committee and Executive Board.

 

A revised legal agreement had been drafted and was appended at Appendix 1 to the report in its draft form and would replace the two existing agreements.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision.

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)          T H A T delegated authority be given to the Managing Director in consultation with the Leader of the Council and the Head of Legal Services to agree and finalise the new Agreement.

 

(2)          T H A T delegated authority be granted to the Leader (or his nominated representative) in connection with the Central South Consortium Joint Committee as referred to in schedule 4 of the Central South Consortium Legal Agreement.

 

(3)          T H A T (if required) delegated authority be granted to the Director of Learning and Skills (or nominated deputy) in connection with the Central South Consortium Executive Board as referred to in schedule 2 of the Central South Consortium Legal Agreement.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)          To expedite the new arrangements for the Central South Consortium set out in the new draft Agreement.

 

(2&3)  To establish the associated delegations required in line with the agreement.

 

 

C2494                        ADOPTION OF ANTI SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR POLICY (HBMCS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION) -                          

Cabinet were apprised of the outcome of the consultation process on the draft policy for dealing with anti-social behaviour in council housing.

 

Cabinet previously considered a report proposing a new approach to dealing with anti-social behaviour for council tenants [Minute No. C2055].  The report emphasised that the policy would apply to the Council in its role as a social landlord.  The principle changes in the new policy were aimed at producing a more outcome focussed approach.  At the core of the new system was a distinction between anti-social behaviour as set out in the Crime and Disorder Act: “Any conduct that causes or was likely to cause harassment, alarm or distress to one or more persons not in the same household,†and estate management nuisance.   It was agreed that there would be a parallel policy for dealing with estate management issues, as attached as Appendix 2 to the report.

 

Cabinet approved the first draft policy subject to consultation with various groups, including tenants and the Safer Vale Partnership.   

 

The consultation focussed on the intention to distinguish between anti-social behaviour and estate nuisance.  The policy also detailed how the Council wished to adopt a different approach to dealing with anti-social behaviour i.e. outcome focussed.  During the consultation, officers sought to gauge people’s opinions as to how different issues should be categorised i.e. either as anti-social behaviour or estate nuisance. 

 

Overall, tenants were in favour of the proposed distinction between anti-social behaviour and estate nuisance and generally concurred with the proposed classification of specific problems.  People endorsed the idea that the Council should tackle serious cases with vigour, while exploring alternative solutions for lower level nuisance.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision.

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the feedback on the draft anti-social behaviour policy (attached at Appendix 1 to the report) arising from the various consultations be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the final anti-social behaviour policy,  incorporates the views collected as part of the consultation process as attached as Appendix 1 to the report be approved. 

 

(3)       T H A T officers be authorised to implement the new anti-social behaviour policy with effect from January 2015, following further staff and stakeholder training.  

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note the consultation process.

 

(2)       To ensure the revised anti-social behaviour policy took reasonable account of the consultation.

 

(3)       To ensure that the new anti-social behaviour policy was implemented and in a timely manner.  

 

C2495                        ADOPTION OF THE DOMESTIC ABUSE POLICY BY THE COUNCIL HOUSING LANDLORD SERVICE (HBMCS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION)       

 

Approval was sought for the new Domestic Abuse Policy for the Council's housing landlord service.

 

There were a number of legislative changes and proposed changes that were driving forward the agenda to improve the responses and services provided to people experiencing domestic abuse:

 

          The Welsh Governments 10,000 Safer Lives Project

          The Renting Homes (Wales) Bill

          The Gender-based Violence, Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence (Wales) Bill

 

The Council's housing landlord service was responsible for managing council tenancies and operated a significant front line service which would be the first point of contact for people experiencing domestic abuse. Developing a consistent approach to people who were experiencing domestic abuse, through the adoption of the Domestic Abuse Policy, would contribute to achieving the aims of the Safer Lives Project.

 

The Renting Homes (Wales) Bill proposed a clearer, simpler and more straightforward legal framework for renting homes. The existing tenancies for renting homes could be a confusing and complex area of law. The proposed changes would make tenancy law easier to understand and enabled cases of domestic abuse and anti-social behaviour to be dealt with more effectively.

 

The Domestic Abuse Policy would strengthen the customer focused approach to tenancy management in cases where domestic abuse was involved. The approach would be further strengthened with legislative changes requiring a ‘prohibited conduct’ term in every tenancy agreement.

 

The Renting Homes (Wales) Bill was scheduled to be introduced into the National Assembly in 2015. A further report to Cabinet would be provided to detail the changes proposed in the Renting Homes (Wales) Bill.

 

The Gender-based Violence, Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence (Wales) Bill was introduced on 30 June, 2014. The Bill aimed to support the Welsh Government's intention for relevant public bodies to address violence against women, domestic abuse and sexual violence in a coordinated manner.

 

The Domestic Abuse Policy would work alongside the new Anti-Social Behaviour Policy, ensuring that incidents arising from domestic abuse were dealt with differently to anti-social behaviour and that the victims were supported appropriately. The changes in these two policies were aimed at producing a more outcome and customer focussed approach to dealing with anti-social behaviour issues and cases of domestic abuse.

 

The Domestic Abuse Policy set out the way in which the Vale of Glamorgan Council as a social landlord would respond to domestic abuse and support tenants affected by domestic abuse.

 

The objectives of the policy was to:

 

1.         Provide a consistent and swift approach to reports of domestic abuse.

2.         Be a reference document for housing staff and tenants to deal confidently and effectively with reported incidents of domestic abuse.

3.         Contribute to the strategic objective of reducing the impact of domestic abuse on victims, their families and also perpetrators.

  

This was a matter for Executive decision.

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the development of the Domestic Abuse Policy and the feedback arising from the consultation undertaken be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the Domestic Abuse Policy as attached at Appendix 1 to the report be approved and officers be authorised to implement the new policy with effect from January 2015.  

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note the consultation process.

 

(2)       To ensure that the Domestic Abuse Policy was implemented for the benefit of council tenants.  

 

C2496                        SECTION 180 – VOLUNTARY FUNDING FOR HOMELESSNESS OUTCOMES            (HBMCS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION) -

 

Approval was sought to continue Section 180 funding for services that positively impacted on the lives of those affected by homelessness.

 

Part VII of the Housing Act 1996 empowered Local Authorities to give assistance by way of a grant or loan to voluntary organisations concerned with homelessness or matters relating to homelessness in their area.  For example, providing advice for young vulnerable people and giving bonds to people to access private sector housing.

 

It was a requirement of Welsh Government that support services be included within the Supported People Programme Grant (SPPG) and that Section 180 funding need only be provided to those agencies who fell outside the criteria of the SPPG.

 

Since 2005 / 2006 the Council had provided Section 180 funding to the Tabernacle Home Access project and Llamau who both provided additional homelessness prevention services to homeless people in the Vale.

 

Tabernacle Baptist Church Home Access was first established in 1993 providing invaluable housing advice to potentially homeless households. From 2013-2014, the scheme was contacted by 272 clients, 141 of which were new referrals for advice and assistance, the remainder were receiving ongoing support.

 

Since 2005/06 the Council had provided Llamau with a grant of £12,000 in support of their JIGSO Project.  This project provided mediation and support to families in crisis.

 

This year Llamau had requested, due to preparation work for the pending new prevention duty, that the £6,000 formerly used for the furniture scheme be transferred to their very successful Supported Lodgings Scheme, thus increasing the temporary accommodation options available to young people in the Vale.

Llamau worked closely with both the Homelessness Team and the Vale's Children Services team. 

 

The Supported Lodgings Scheme was an essential resource for the young people of the Vale and had resulted in a massive reduction in the use of bed & breakfast and, therefore, the associated costs to the Council. The request to transfer funding was supported by council officers as the proposal was recognised as a strategic use of the limited resource available under the Section 180 grant.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision.

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the outcomes achieved by the projects managed by the Tabernacle Home Access team and Llamau be noted.     

 

(2)       T H A T the Head of Housing and Building Services be authorised to continue to pay Section 180 funding to the Tabernacle Home Access Project, in the amount of £5,000 and Llamau's JIGSO and Supported Lodgings projects in the amount of £18,000 for the financial year 2014/2015. 

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note the important role the projects managed by the Tabernacle Home Access team and Llamau play in supporting the Council's homelessness service.

 

(2)       To ensure the continuation of the Section 180 schemes detailed.

 

 

C2497                        STREET LIGHTING ENERGY REDUCTION STRATEGY (EVS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) -             

 

Approval was sought for changes in the Council's street lighting arrangements aimed at significantly reducing future costs and energy consumption.

 

There was no statutory requirement on Local Authorities in the UK to provide public lighting. The Highways Act 1980 empowered local highway authorities to light roads but did not place a duty on them to do so. The Council, as the local highway authority, did however have a duty of care to its road users and therefore, it could be deemed, was subject to an obligation to light certain parts of the highway dependent on the level of risk posed. The Council also had a statutory duty under the Highways Act to ensure the safety of the highway and that included any lighting equipment placed on it. Further, the Council should give regard to its duties under the Crime and Disorder Act 1998, ensuring that any of its decisions take into account the possible effects on crime and disorder in an area. 

 

The Council relied on unmetered electricity supplied to power its 15,795 street lights.  For unmetered supplies a cost for each light unit was established based on its energy consumption and time lit, this was then totalled by the electricity supplier to provide an annual supply cost. The Council's street lighting energy costs had increased by 28% per unit of energy since 2011/12 and this trend looked set to continue.

 

As of 1 July, 2014, 2247 lower wattage LED lanterns had been installed, 514 lower wattage white lanterns had been installed, 1492 street lamps had been dimmed between midnight and 6am, and 1975 street lights dimmed between 10:00 p.m. and 06:00 a.m.  These changes had saved in excess of £60k per annum in energy costs, reducing emissions by 300 tonnes of COâ‚‚ per annum.

        

Taking into account the Council's current street lighting stock position (end of 2014/15) and the level of financial savings required by the Council over the next 3 years, there was a range of street lighting options that could form the principles of a future strategy. A summary of the costs and savings that could be realised by these options along with the environmental impacts and payback periods was attached at Appendix A to the report. An appraisal of the various options was outlined as follows:

 

Option 1 – Do nothing

 

Option 2 – Change to full LED

This was not entirely feasible as 5.5% of the lighting stock (877 lighting columns) had a decorative/ornate style of lantern, and to date, there was no option to replace these luminaires with LED units.

 

Option 3 – Change to full LED with a Central Management System (CMS)

A CMS system enabled lighting levels and timings to be adjusted remotely across the entire street lighting portfolio. It would be virtually impossible to establish the exact savings in energy costs from utilising this system until a specific switching regime was put into place for each individual luminaire i.e.: dimming, part night, switch off etc. Appendix A attached to the report, therefore indicated either the 12 am or 1 am part night operation, but there would be an additional savings element should this option be chosen. Again the investment required for this option was prohibitive.

 

Option 4 - Retain LED current lighting arrangements and dim all remaining SON and SOX and alike light lanterns

SOX lighting could not be dimmed so these had been taken out of the equation.

 

Option 5 – Retain LED stock and part night (1am) 70% of the remaining stock

In order to maintain night-time economy areas and the safety of certain highway junctions it had been assumed that 10% of each type of non LED light source (30% in total) would retain dusk until dawn operation with the remaining being part night.

 

Option 6 – Retain LED stock and part night (12am) 70% of the remaining stock

As Option 5 above but with an earlier switch off time. Clearly, the greater the period of light 'switch off' the more challenging the decision, but this option provided the greatest savings in terms of both costs; £371,862.71 per annum and carbon 1,338 tonnes per annum, and was therefore the preferred principle for the street lighting strategy.

 

Option 7a

As option 5 but with all lighting stock on CMS. The payback period on this option was too long due to the installation and running costs of the CMS system. 

 

Option 7b

As option 6 but with all lighting stock on CMS. The payback period on this option was too long.

 

Option 8 - Permanently switch off all lights

In order to switch off all street lights, our electricity distribution company would probably insist on permanently disconnecting their service supply cables from the entry points that consisted of 12,026 underground services, 1205 overhead services and approximately 2469 lighting columns with a private cable network which could be isolated from local feeder pillars. This was not a viable option due mostly to health and safety concerns.

 

The graph attached at Appendix B to the report provided an indication of the projected impact of rising energy costs over a 15 year period. The graph showed a 'Do Nothing' option alongside the projected budget and also the cost of the preferred option (option 6 as outlined above). This clearly showed that the 'Do Nothing' option was unaffordable in the current economic climate. Option 6 above however provided additional savings to those already offered, that could potentially be used to lessen the impact on other frontline services.

 

The principle of the preferred street lighting strategy was to progress option 6 but to also continue to change all remaining non LED lights to LED when the relevant funding became available.

      

Option 6, required up front funding of circa £350k and it was suggested that this be provided from Visible Services reserve. The work to install the part night sensors would be externally tendered and the duration of the work was at least 3 months. It was possible that this work could be completed by the end of this current financial year, if authority to proceed was provided by the end of November 2014.

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for the Environment and Visible Services

emphasised that areas already with LED lighting would be kept on along with  Major Roundabouts, Road Junctions and areas of night time economy.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the implementation of a street lighting strategy based on the principle of reduced energy consumption with part night lighting introduced for all appropriate areas of conventional street lighting as an initial measure, as outlined in Option 6 of the report be agreed.

 

(2)       T H A T the Director of Visible Services and Housing be authorised to invite tenders for the installation of part night timing devices for the Council's conventional street lighting stock.

 

(3)       T H A T the background information contained in the report relating to LED lighting be noted and a further report be provided to Cabinet detailing the proposed full street lighting energy reduction strategy on conclusion of the 'part night' street lighting introduction and discussions with potential partners.

 

(4)       T H A T the report be referred to the Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) for information.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To approve the main principles of a new street lighting strategy, fit for the financial and environmental challenges ahead.

 

(2)       To provide authority to engage contractors to undertake all works associated with the change to part night street lighting in accordance with option 6 of the report.   

 

(3)       To agree the full 10 year strategy when all future street lighting management options had been considered by officers.

 

(4)       To inform the appropriate Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment). 

 

 

C2498                        LEGACY LEISURE (LPCSD) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE - ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) - 

 

Approval was sought to permit a subcontract to the Leisure Management Contract (the Contract) to a new Trust Operator, Legacy Leisure Limited.

 

Parkwood Leisure Limited was awarded a contract to operate the Vale of Glamorgan's leisure centres for a period of ten years', with a potential five-year extension, following an extensive procurement process.  The contract commenced on 1 August, 2012.

 

The other private sector bidders for the contract submitted their tenders using a Leisure Trust model. Parkwood Leisure did not use this model at the time but had since developed a similar Trust model using a new organisation, Legacy Leisure Limited.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T subject to consideration of the Part II report to be heard later on the agenda. the Director of Development Services, in consultation with the Managing Director and the Head of Legal Services, be authorised to enter into negotiations with both Parkwood Leisure and Legacy Leisure Limited to authorise a sub-contract of the existing contract to Legacy Leisure Limited,

 

(2)       T H A T subject to consideration of the Part II report to be heard later on the agenda, and subject to successful negotiations, the Leisure Management Contract be sub-contracted to Legacy Leisure Limited, and consent to the grant of sub leases to Legacy Leisure Limited be granted, in relation to each Leisure Centre and the Head of Legal Services be authorised to negotiate, agree and execute the requisite legal documentation.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To investigate the potential for further cost savings to the Council, without affecting the current quality of the service provided.

 

(2)       To provide further cost savings to the Council.

 

C2499                        EXCLUSION OF PRESS AND PUBLIC -

RESOLVED - T H A T under Section 100A(4) of the Local Government Act 1972, the press and public be excluded from the meeting for the following item of business on the grounds that it involves the likely disclosure of exempt information as defined in Part 4 of Schedule 12A (as amended) of the Act, the relevant paragraphs of the Schedule being referred to in brackets after the minute heading.

 

C2500                        LEGACY LEISURE (LPCSD) (EXEMPT INFORMATION – PARAGRAPH 14) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE - ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) - 

  

Approval was sought to permit a subcontract of the Leisure Management Contract (the Contract) to a new Trust Operator, Legacy Leisure Limited.

  

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the Director of Development Services, in consultation with the Managing Director and the Head of Legal Services, be authorised to enter into negotiations with both Parkwood Leisure and Legacy Leisure Limited to authorise a sub-contract of the existing contract to Legacy Leisure Limited.

 

(2)       T H A T subject to successful negotiations the Leisure Management Contract be sub-contracted to Legacy Leisure Limited, and consent to the grant of sub leases to Legacy Leisure Limited be granted, in relation to each Leisure Centre and the Head of Legal Services be authorised to negotiate, agree and execute the requisite legal documentation.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To investigate the potential for further cost savings to the Council, without affecting the current quality of the service provided. 

 

(2)       To provide further cost savings to the Council.

 

 

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