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Agenda Item No.

 

CABINET

 

Minutes of a meeting held on 03 November, 2014.

 

Present: Councillor N. Moore (Chairman), Councillor S.C. Egan (Vice – Chairman); Councillors: L. Burnett, R. Curtis, C.P.J. Elmore and G. John.

 

Apologies:     Cllr. B.E. Brooks.

 

Also Present: Cllr. N. Hodges.

                                                    

C2501                        MINUTES –

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the meeting held on 20 October, 2014 be approved as a correct record.

 

C2502            DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST –

 

The following declarations of interest were received:

 

 

Councillor L.Burnett.

Agenda Item 6 -  Christmas Grants 2014

 

Reason for declaration -

 

Elected Member of Penarth Town Council.

 

Agenda Item 13 – School Performance Report for the end of Key Stages 4 and 5

 

Reason for declaration -

 

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at St Cyres Comprehensive School. As an LEA Governor, her personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore she was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Councillr G.John.

Agenda Item 6 -  Christmas Grants 2014

 

Reason for declaration -

 

Elected Member of Llantwit Major Town Council.

 

Agenda Item 13 – School Performance Report for the end of Key Stages 4 and 5

 

Reason for declaration -

 

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at Llantwit Major Comprehensive School. As an LEA Governor, his personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore he was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Councillor S.Egan

Agenda Item 6 -  Christmas Grants 2014

 

Reason for declaration -

 

Elected Member of Barry Town Council.

 

Councillor R. Curtis.

Agenda Item 6 -  Christmas Grants 2014

 

Reason for declaration -

 

Elected Member of Barry Town Council.

 

Councillor C. Elmore.

Agenda Item 13 – School Performance Report for the end of Key Stages 4 and 5

 

Reason for declaration -

 

A Local Education Authority (LEA) appointed Governor at Barry Comprehensive School. As an LEA Governor, his personal interest did not equate to a prejudicial interest and therefore he was able to speak and vote on the matter.

 

 

C2503                        APPOINTMENT OF LOCAL AUTHORITY GOVERNORS ADVISORY PANEL -             

 

The minutes of the above meeting held on 22 October, 2014 were submitted.

 

Present:  Councillor C.P.J. Elmore (Chairman); Councillors Ms. B.E. Brooks (substitute for Councillor C.P.J. Elmore and Councillor F.T. Johnson), C.P. Franks, T.H. Jarvie and A.G. Powell (substitute for Councillor Mrs M.R. Wilkinson).

 

Also present: Mrs. M.E. Gibbs (Vale Governors Association).

 

(a)       Apologies for Absence

 

These were received from Councillors P.J. Clarke, F.T. Johnson and Mrs. M.R. Wilkinson.

 

(b)       Declarations of Interest

 

The following declarations were received:

 

           Councillor Ms. B.E. Brooks (Governor of Jenner Park Primary School)

           Councillor C.P.J. Elmore (Governor of Barry Comprehensive School)

            Councillor C.P. Franks (Governor of Ysgol Pen-y- Garth)

           Councillor T.H. Jarvie (Applicant for Cowbridge Comprehensive School and Governor of Ysgol Iolo Morganwg)

           Councillor A.G. Powell (Governor of Barry and Bryn Hafren Comprehensive

           Schools)

            Mrs. M. Gibbs (Governor of Romilly Primary School).

 

(NOTE: The above Members withdrew from the meeting during consideration of applications in respect of the related schools.)

 

(c)        Guidance Regarding Appointment Process

 

A new appointment process had been agreed by Cabinet at its meeting on 8th September 2014 with all Applicants having to complete an application form and skills register as part of the application process.  A full list of all current Local Authority (LA) Governor vacancies was attached at Appendix 1 to the report and a copy of the policy governing such appointments was attached at Appendix 5.  Substitutes were in attendance at the meeting in respect of the LA Governor vacancies where members of the Committee were themselves Governors. 

 

The Senior Governor Support Officer outlined the new procedure and advised of the requirement for applicants to attach a completed Skills Register to their application.  Schools were also invited to complete and submit a Register of Need outlining the type of skills required for their Governing Body.  The Learning and Skills Directorate was also considering further ways of attracting more applicants and was currently in the process of contacting key employers in the Vale of Glamorgan to seek support and assistance in advertising for the role.  Following the outline of the new process it was subsequently

 

RECOMMENDED – T H A T the guidance regarding the appointment process be noted.

 

(d)       Exclusion of Press and Public – 

 

RESOLVED – T H A T under Section 100A(4) of the Local Government Act 1972, the press and public be excluded from the meeting for the following item of business on the grounds that it involves the likely disclosure of exempt information as defined in Part 4 of Schedule 12A (as amended) of the Act, the relevant paragraphs of the Schedule being referred to in brackets after the minute heading.

 

(e)       Applications for Appointment of Current Local Authority Governor Vacancies (Exempt Information – paragraph 12)

 

Following agreement by the Panel that all late applications as contained within the agenda be accepted, a copy of Councillor T.H. Jarvie’s Skills Register and a revised application for R.J Bertin for St. Richard Gwyn R/C School were tabled at the meeting. 

 

Having fully considered the criteria for the appointment of Local Authority (LA) Governors, the applications for appointment of LA Governors and the information tabled at the meeting as outlined above, it was subsequently

 

RECOMMENDED to Cabinet –

 

(1)       T H A T the following appointments be made for the schools as set out below:

 

 

School

Appointment

Albert Primary

J.M. Warren

Barry Comprehensive School

A. Forte

Bryn Hafren Comprehensive School

D. Harding

A. Roberts-Walsh

Bute Cottage Nursery School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Cadoxton Primary School

S. Davies

Cogan Primary School

C. Foster

J. L. Griffiths

Colcot Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Colcot Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Cowbridge Comprehensive School

Councillor T.H. Jarvie

Dinas Powys Infant School

S. Arthur

J. Davies

Evenlode Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Evenlode Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Fairfield Primary School

C. Maher *

Gladstone Primary School

P. Drake

M.J.H. Trickey

Gwenfo C/W Primary School

R.M. Davies

High Street Primary School

Councillor S.C. Egan

High Street Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Jenner Park Primary School

D.A. Griffiths

Llandough Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Llanfair Primary School

A.J. Crowe **

Llansannor C/W Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Oakfield Primary School

C. Maher *

Oakfield Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Palmerston Primary School

N. Herbert

Pendoylan C/W Primary School

Dr. N. Harris

Romilly Primary School

L. Sokolski

St. Andrews C/W Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

St. Athan Primary School

L. Fraser

A.M. Little

St. Helen’s R/C Junior  School

Councillor F.T. Johnson

St. Illtyd Primary School

A.J. Crowe **

St. Joseph’s R/C Primary School

That M.A. Wilson’s appointment as Governor be extended to February 2015 and the current application deferred until that date, in order that clarification can be sought in respect of the Headteacher’s reference.

St. Nicholas C/W Primary School

N.V. Wellard

St. Nicholas C/W Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

St. Nicholas C/W Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

St. Nicholas C/W Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Sully Primary School

W. Ellis

Victoria Primary School

A. Reynolds

Victoria Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Victoria Primary School

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Y Bont Faen Primary School

C. Beavan

Councillor G.A. Cox

Ysgol Gwaun y Nant 

N. Dryburgh

Ysgol Iolo Morganwg

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Ysgol Pen y Garth

D.R. Wilton

Ysgol Sant Baruc

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Ysgol Sant Curig

D.J. Horgan

M. Thomas

Ysgol Sant Curig

Deferred to 25th February 2015 Panel meeting

Ysgol y Deri

Councillor R.J. Bertin

Dr. A. Cosslett

B.T. Exell

D.M. Jackson

 

*          That Ms. C. Maher be requested to consider whether she wished to accept appointments to the two schools, if not, Fairfield Primary School to be re-advertised.

 

**         That Mr. Crowe be requested to consider whether he wished to accept appointments to the two schools, if not, St. Illtyd Primary School to be re-advertised.

 

(2)       T H A T the following applications be refused:

 

School

Reason for refusal

St. Richard Gwyn R/C School

R.J. Bertin – Incomplete application – an  LA Governor Skills Register had not been received.

Wick and Marcross C/W Primary School

M.E. Cornelius  – Incomplete application – no application form had been received.  

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To allow Cabinet to consider the appointments in respect of the above Schools’ Governing Bodies.

 

(2)       In view of the reasons as outlined above.

 

(f)        Announcement

 

The Chairman took the opportunity to inform Members that the next LA Governor Panel meeting would be held on 25th February, 2015 at 9.30 a.m. and the following schools where a vacancy had been deferred would be considered at this next meeting:

 

School

Number of Vacancies

Bute Cottage Nursery School

1

Colcot Primary School

2

Evenlode Primary School

2

High Street Primary School

1

Llandough Primary School

1

Llansannor C/W Primary School

1

Oakfield Primary School

1

St. Andrews C/W Primary School

1

St. Nicholas C/W Primary School

2

St. Richard Gwyn R/C High School

1

Victoria Primary School

2

Ysgol Iolo Morganwg

1

Ysgol Sant Baruc

1

Ysgol Sant Curig

1

 

----------------------------------------------

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for Children’s Services commented that two governor applications received were incomplete and therefore, were not considered under the new system guidelines for the appointment of Governors.

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the Local Authority Governors Advisory Panel meeting held on 22 October, 2014 be endorsed.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the minutes.

 

C2504                        AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES: ANNUAL IMPROVEMENT REPORT 2014 (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES)      

       

Cabinet was advised of the results of the assessment by the Auditor General for Wales of the Council's arrangements to secure continuous improvement.

 

Each year, the Auditor General must report on how well Welsh councils were planning for improvement and delivering their services. The Wales Audit Office's Annual Improvement Report of the Council was attached at Appendix 1 to the report

 

Overall, the Auditor General had concluded that: the Council was making good progress in delivering improvement in its priority areas, but needed to report more clearly on the outcomes achieved. The Council’s performance evaluation and reporting arrangements were improving, but did not yet provide a complete and easily accessible explanation of the outcomes achieved. The Council’s planning for improvement and its arrangements to support improvement were sound.

 

The report concluded that:

 

           The Council achieved most of its objectives and was focussed on addressing areas of weakness but should make greater use of external benchmarking in relation to internal targets and reporting performance;

           The Council complied with Welsh Government publication requirements; although its methods of data verification for the Leisure Services contractor were not as strong as for its own services;

           The Council had effective plans for managing the financial challenges it faced and had developed a plan intended to prepare its workforce for the future;

          The Council generally had strengths in driving improvement across most services and responded positively to challenge. However, significant improvement was required in the delivery of disabled facilities grants and in managing the leisure contract

 

The report made three proposals for improvement:

 

          (P1) Improve performance reporting by clearly explaining the:

-           benefits arising from the achievement of objectives; and

-           issues arising from not achieving objectives and the action being taken to secure improvement

 

           (P2) Review target setting methods as a means of driving improvement to ensure they achieve the level of service expected by members.

 

           (P3) Improve the management of the Leisure contract by:

-           refining the contract management regime to ensure that it formally and systematically tests the extent to which contracts are being monitored effectively paying particular attention to the Leisure contract;

-           undertaking a review to determine the appropriate level and skills mix of resources required to effectively monitor the Leisure contract;

-           ensuring the standard definitions for performance indicators were being utilised and data was recorded accordingly paying particular attention to the Leisure contract; and

-           training members to ensure that an effective level of challenge is presented to officers.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the report be referred to Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) for information.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note the contents of the report.

 

(2)       For the Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) to review of the Auditor General's Improvement Assessment Report.

 

C2505                        CHRISTMAS GRANTS 2014 (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) -      

 

Approval was sought on the awarding of Christmas Grants.

 

Town and Community Councils had been requested to submit suitable "Christmas feature" projects for CASH funding, and pensioner and similar organisations had been invited to apply for financial assistance towards provision of a Christmas lunch for their members.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)          T H A T the per capita sum to be made available to pensioner and similar organisations that apply for Christmas Lunches 2014 be, £4.25.

 

(2)          T H A T the sum to be made available to each Town / Community Council that apply for Christmas CASH funding 2014 be £475, with the exception of Penarth Town Council, Barry Town Council and Llantwit Major Town Council, which were dealt with in the below recommendations;

 

Councillors S. Egan and R. Curtis declared an interest in this item as elected members of Barry Town Council and left the room

 

(3)       T H A T the sum to be made available to Barry Town Council for Christmas CASH funding 2014 (should Barry Town Council apply) be £475.

 

Councillor G. John declared an interest in this item as an elected member of Llantwit Major Town Council and left the room

 

(4)       T H A T the sum to be made available to Llantwit Major Town Council for Christmas CASH funding 2014 (should Llantwit Major Town Council apply) be £475.

 

Councillor L. Burnett declared an interest in this item as an elected member of Penarth Town Council and left the room

 

(5)       T H A T the sum to be made available to Penarth Town Council for Christmas CASH funding 2014 should (Penarth Town Council apply) be £475.

 

Reason for decisions

 

(1-5)    To award grants in accordance with the approved scheme.

 

 

C2506                        EXTERNAL FUNDING: MAXIMISING THE EMPLOYMENT POTENTIAL OF THE GLAMORGAN HERITAGE COAST (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES AND ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT)

 

Cabinet was informed of an external funding bid submitted on 24 September to Coastal Communities which was delivered by the Big Lottery Fund on behalf of the UK Government and the devolved administration of Wales.

 

The bid was for £224,759 funding towards a project to maximise the employment potential of the Heritage Coast.  The project would encourage the development of new businesses along the entire Vale of Glamorgan Heritage Coast, focusing on capital improvements at Dunraven Bay in Southerndown as a hub for this activity.

The key aspects of the project were;

 

           Employment of a Glamorgan Heritage Coast Coastal Activities Development Officer to support the expansion and creation of micro enterprises within the Glamorgan Heritage Coast area.  The Development Officer would seek to exploit opportunities for business from the coast path and activities along the coast. 

 

           Creation of business storage units at the Heritage Coast Centre for off and on shore activities such as paddle boarding, kite surfing, surfing, beach schooling and kayaking.

 

           Accessible beach wheelchairs

Repairs to the slipway at Dunraven Bay (derelict for over 10 years) to allow access for the activities listed above and to make the beach more accessible for wheelchair users.  Options were being considered for the long term management of the slipway and officers were working with the landowners to identify the most appropriate and sustainable way forward. 

 

           Implementation of recommendations listed as part of the recently commissioned Glamorgan Heritage Coast Interpretation Plan.

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for Leisure, Parks, Culture and Sports Development commented that he welcomed the funding scheme for the Glamorgan Heritage Coast as it would bring many benefits including further employment opportunities to the area.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the bid submitted to maximise the employment potential of the Glamorgan Heritage Coast be approved.

 

(2)       T H A T delegated authority be granted to the Head of Legal Services in consultation with the Leader to accept the grant if awarded, and approve all the terms of the grant.

 

Reason for decisions

 

(1&2)  To accept the grant, including all the terms of the grant,

 

C2507                        MANAGEMENT RESTRUCTURE FOR THE CIVIL PROTECTION TEAM (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION) -   

            

Approval was sought for a change in the line management of the Civil Protection Team and to recommend an amendment to the Council's constitution. 

 

The Civil Contingences Act (CCA) (2004) resulted in the separation of a joint working arrangement with Cardiff Council in 2005, for which the Vale of Glamorgan Council was the lead authority. This acted as a catalyst for the Vale of Glamorgan Council to have its own Emergency Planning service, now know as the Civil Protection Unit (CPU).  The CPU was placed within the Directorate of Legal, Public Protection and Housing Services with the Principal Civil Protection Officer reporting to the Director of Legal, Public Protection and Housing Services.  The Unit was based at the Alps offices.

 

There had been a number of incidents and emergencies that had affected the Council over recent  years, and the CPU had successfully coordinated the operational response to these and ensured that the Council could continue to deliver its' service to the community in extreme circumstances.  

                       

Following these emergencies/incidents and through the de-brief process the CPU had developed effective procedures with Visible Services to ensure that the response could be improved and that the Councils limited resources were used to best effect. 

 

The systems that had been put into place had developed a robust working ethos between the CPU and Visible Services that delivered smooth and effective management of emergency's and incidents.

 

Given the synergies that existed in the management of emergencies the most appropriate service area where the CPU would best fit would be Visible Services, with the Principal Civil Protection Officer reporting to the Director of Visible Services and Housing. The CPU was already based at the Alps offices so there would be no need to incur any costs for relocation and this would save on staff travelling costs from the Alps to the Civic Offices.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the strategic and operational management of the Civil Protection Unit be transferred to the Director of Visible Services and Housing with effect from 4 November, 2014.

 

(2)       T H A T it be recommended to Council that Article 12 of the Council's Constitution be amended to reflect the decision of Cabinet by adding 'Civil Protection' to the functions and areas of responsibility of the Director of Visible Services and Housing.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To enable the Director of Visible Services and Housing to take management responsibility for the Civil Protection Unit.

 

(2)       To recommend to Council an amendment to the Council's Constitution.

   

C2508                        YOUTH EMPLOYMENT IN THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES)

 

Cabinet was provided with an update on the Council’s approach to the employment of apprentices across service areas and ways in which the approach could be extended through working with other authorities and/or the use of Jobs Growth Wales placements.

 

When considering the Council’s responsibilities toward supporting young people into employment there were a number of options that could be considered, including providing Jobs Growth Wales placements within the Council and providing further apprenticeship opportunities. 

 

The Council’s Workforce Plan identified the need to 'ensure the workforce reflected the wider community across the Vale of Glamorgan'.  Additionally, 'with an increased emphasis on 'localism’ we would need to promote employment opportunities from within the local labour market and specifically promote the Council as a potential employer for school leavers setting out on their careers'.

 

The Council regularly provided work experience opportunities across its services, and had established a Foundation Modern Apprenticeship (FMA) programme, delivered by a local Work Based Learning Provider that had been in place for over 10 years.

 

At present there were 30 FMAs being supported in office based positions across the Council, who received a work placement for 65 weeks and were initially paid £82 per week. This amount could rise to £195 per week, dependent on length of service and age.

 

The provision of Foundation Modern Apprenticeships was currently limited to office-based positions; however the Council also supported a small number of craft apprentices within the Housing and Building Section. The programme had supported two apprentices every year for the last 10 years, working closely with local colleges.

 

Both of the above schemes attracted apprentices mainly from within the Vale of Glamorgan area; a principle which needed to continue as part of the development of the employment of apprentices.  The cost of both approaches was shared i.e. the cost of the employment being met by the Council and the training costs being met by the Work Based Learning Provider.

 

Jobs Growth Wales was a Welsh Government funded response to the unemployment levels experienced by young people across Wales.  The programme provides six month job placements for unemployed young people, aged 16-24, who were paid at National Minimum Wage. 

 

The programme did, however, have clear limitations.  A level of commitment was expected from the employer to provide on-going sustainable employment for the individuals following their placement, and further allocation of placements was subject to the employer meeting agreed targets in this area.

 

Successes in relation to the Jobs Growth Wales initiative in the public sector had mainly been reported where it had been used as part of a blended approach, e.g. both Rhondda Cynon Taff and Caerphilly used the placements as part of a broader delivery package, alongside work experience placements, apprenticeships etc., to find the most suitable employment path for those involved.

 

One of the potentially best examples in Wales of the blended approach had been found in Caerphilly Council who had developed an extensive ‘Passport’ programme in response to the need to provide training and employment opportunities for young people within the borough. 

 

The programme had been developed by Caerphilly Council (a team of 8 FTE) in partnership with the Caerphilly Local Service Board, in conjunction with Caerphilly Council officers, Gwent Police, Aneurin Bevan Health Board, Caerphilly Business Forum and the Voluntary Sector, as well as working with local private companies to provide a joined up solution to support young people into employment across the

whole region.

 

The target audience for the programme was those young people, aged between 16 and 24, who had been unemployed for less than 26 weeks and were therefore not yet engaged in the Work Programme. 

 

To date Caerphilly had received 670 referrals to the scheme, although of these, 263 subsequently did not engage with the programme following the initial diagnostic period. They had established 240 Jobs Growth Wales placements across the County, of which 149 had now been completed.  Of these 57 found ongoing employment with Caerphilly Council, 53 found external employment, four moved into full time education, five completed the programme early and 30 found no ongoing form of employment. 

 

The Council had been in exploratory talks with the Passport Team at Caerphilly and there was an opportunity to further investigate the possibility of a partnership approach with them, to introduce and adapt the model within the context of the Vale of Glamorgan,

 

Based on the tentative discussions with Caerphilly Council this would involve the diverting of part of the existing corporate training budget (up to £15,000) which was currently used for FMAs and related issues. This amount from the corporate budget would be reduced by any modest contributions from the Learning and Skills Directorate to support the NEETs (and wider youth unemployment) agenda. The contribution would be match funded to support a seconded Passport Support Officer subject to meeting the funding requirements of WEFO / DfES.  Placements secured as part of the Passport Scheme would remain on the payroll of Caerphilly Council.

 

This partnership arrangement would, therefore require no additional funding but would have potentially significant benefits as set out in this report.

 

Clearly there was a need to fully explore the implications of this approach (including funding issues) before commitment was sought and a further report would be submitted to Cabinet should approval be needed to progress the matter.

 

The Council had made a considerable amount of progress in the development of employment opportunities for young people, but to move forward had a number of options for consideration, within the context of the changing environment that faced the Council over the coming years:

 

           Option 1

Continue with the existing provision of Foundation Modern Apprenticeships for office-based positions (whilst recognising the associated limitations).  As indicated, this option could be pursued, but did suffer from a number of weaknesses as outlined in paragraph 20 of the report.

 

          Option 2

Develop the use of Jobs Growth Wales placements on an adhoc basis (alongside the existing provision).  This was a possible option, but there was a higher level of investment required by managers, with a limited return on this investment without a co-ordinated approach.

 

           Option  3

Broaden into a Council-wide approach incorporating both Jobs Growth Wales placements, as well as further developing the apprenticeship programme.  This option would require the full funding of a FTE position within the Vale of Glamorgan, in order to develop a model of delivery which could be adopted across the authority.

 

           Option 4

Partnering with Caerphilly Council to develop a 'Passport Programme' within the Vale of Glamorgan. A match funded secondment FTE would be required to work with the existing Caerphilly Passport Team, in order to deliver their proven model across the Vale of Glamorgan. This would maximise the return on investment with the advantages of a co-ordinated approach, with a breadth of coverage using Caerphilly’s existing infrastructure to support the delivery.  Any barriers to DfES/WEFO funding would need to be fully resolved as part of any further discussions with Caerphilly.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the issues and options as set out in the report be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the continued progression of exploratory discussions with Caerphilly County Borough Council (as set out in paragraphs 27 – 40 of the report) to pursue a partnership approach to the employment of apprentices be approved.

 

(3)          T H A T the report be referred to the Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) for information.

 

(4)          T H A T a further report be brought back to a future meeting of Cabinet on the outcome of the discussions with Caerphilly County Borough Council.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1&2)  To continue to make progress in relation to meeting the objectives set out in the Corporate Plan (2013-2017) and the Corporate Workforce Plan (2013-2017).

 

(3)       To ensure that Corporate Resources (Scrutiny Committee) Members were appraised of development in relation to the use of Jobs Growth Wales placements in view of previous information requests in this area.

 

(4)       To ensure that Cabinet was kept informed of the outcome of further discussions with Caerphilly County Borough Council.

   

C2509                        DELEGATED AUTHORITY TO THE MANAGING DIRECTOR (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) -          

 

Approval was sought for the granting of delegated authority in consultation with the Leader to consider and if deemed appropriate authorise payments in settlement of certain claims.

 

Pursuant to Section 21 of the Public Services Ombudsman (Wales) Act 2005, the Public Services Ombudsman for Wales ('the Ombudsman') after conducting an investigation into a complaint of maladministration in respect of a Welsh Unitary Authority may conclude that the public interest did not require an investigation report to be publicised. In such cases the Ombudsman may recommend that a payment was made by the Unitary Authority to the complainant.

 

Similarly on occasions prior to conducting a formal  investigation the Ombudsman may reach a finding of maladministration at what was commonly known as the 'assessment stage'.

 

Currently, Cabinet had authority to make payments or provide other benefits in cases of maladministration (this is in line with Section 92 of the Local Government Act 1972) and as such had authority to delegate.

 

The timescales set by the Ombudsman for payments to be made by the Unitary Authority to the complainant was usually short and could cause administrative problems, which would be eased by granting the suggested officer delegation as outlined below.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED – T H A T  delegated authority be granted to the Managing Director (or in the Managing Director's absence the nominated Deputy) in consultation with the Leader to consider and if deemed appropriate authorise payments in settlement of maladministration claims referred to the Public Services Ombudsman for Wales when there was no legal requirement to publicise the matter.

 

Reason for decision

 

To enable payments to be authorised and actioned in consultation with the Leader expeditiously.

 

C2510                        RESHAPING SERVICES – A NEW CHANGE PROGRAMME FOR THE COUNCIL (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) -    

 

Cabinet was provided with an update on the development of the Reshaping Services Change Programme.

 

In August 2014, Cabinet agreed in principle to instituting a Reshaping Services strategy and change programme.

 

The Reshaping Services programme was the Council’s proactive response to central government’s austerity drive that had created a period of unprecedented financial pressures in the public sector. The Vale of Glamorgan Council’s budget had already been under pressure for a number of years with £28.8million in savings identified since 2010/11, further substantial savings were necessary in 2015/16, 2016/17 and 2017/18. The latest draft Medium Term Financial Plan now estimated that this would equate to a reduction of over £10million in 2015/16 and £32million in total over the next three years. Failure to deliver the required level of savings would not be an option for the Council. According to many analysts the period of austerity was likely to continue for councils and the public sector.

 

Cabinet’s approval in principle to instituting the Reshaping Services strategy and change programme was subject to further work being undertaken on the strategy. The work involved consultation and engagement activities being undertaken with key stakeholder groups, the delivery of briefing sessions to members and officers and the development of further detail on the way forward.

 

The report and the updated Reshaping Services Strategy attached at Appendix 1 to the report provided details of the work undertaken to date and how it was proposed that the strategy be implemented.

 

In developing the Reshaping Services programme, the Council recognised the importance of working with a range of stakeholders to identify alternative approaches to service delivery. A key aspect of the work completed since August 2014 had been to consult and engage with a range of stakeholder groups in order to refine both the Reshaping Services Strategy and the approach to mobilising and implementing it.

 

The following groups had been consulted:

 

           All Council Scrutiny Committees (with Corporate Resources being the lead Committee)

           Community Liaison Committee

           Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee

           Trade Unions

           Local Service Board partners including Health and the Police

 

Consistent themes arising from the consultation exercise included:

 

           The importance of clear governance and reporting;

           The need to open up the challenge process to a range of stakeholders;

           The requirement for a clear two-way communications plan to be put in place;

           The recognition of the organisational development and learning that is required to support a programme of such significant change.

           Recognition that appropriate resources will be required to deliver change on this scale.

 

The strategy had been updated to incorporate these themes. Detail had been included in the strategy relating to the way in which the Reshaping Services change programme would be governed, including a description of the functions of the Cabinet Working Group (the Challenge Group), the Council’s Corporate Management Team acting as a Programme Board and the role of Scrutiny Committees and partners in the process.

 

The process for challenging council services to identify different ways of delivering was described in further detail in the strategy attached at Appendix 1 to the report. The process described how the initial short-list of potential services to be reshaped drawn up by the Challenge Group would be subject to consideration by the Council’s Scrutiny Committees and other partners such as the voluntary sector.

 

A high level communications plan was included in the strategy, highlighting the key stakeholder groups that would be communicated with and engaged throughout the delivery of the programme. A description of the methods and frequency of these activities was also included.

 

Further information relating to the organisational development activities that would be necessary to support the Council’s elected members and officers and partner organisations to adapt to the changing environment had been included in the strategy.

 

Consideration was also given to the way in which the Reshaping Services programme would be delivered, including the resources required to do so. Details relating to resourcing arrangements were included in the strategy and financial implications section of the report.

 

The Reshaping Services strategy had been developed to deliver a corporate change programme for the whole authority. Change programmes of this kind were complex and comprise a range of different elements of work that were required to ensure success, including:

 

           A robust implementation approach

           On-going consultation and communications activities

           The support of a structured organisational development plan.

 

The implementation of the strategy would be consistent with the Council’s project management toolkit, including consideration of sustainability, equality and legislative requirements.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the views of Scrutiny Committees and other stakeholder groups as outlined in this report be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the Reshaping Services Strategy and change programme as set out in the report and associated appendices attached at Appendix 1 and 2 to the report be approved.

 

(3)       T H A T further reports be presented to Cabinet in due course to provide updates on the progress of the Reshaping Services corporate change programme.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note the views of Scrutiny Committee’s and other stakeholder groups in reaching a decision.

 

(2)       To enable the Council to respond constructively to significantly diminishing resources by developing alternative means of service delivery in partnership with stakeholders.

 

(3)       To ensure Cabinet was kept fully informed of the progress being made on the programme.

  

C2511                        ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL SERVICES 2013/2014 (AS AND CS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – SOCIAL CARE AND HEALTH)     

 

Cabinet was presented with the final version of the Director's Annual Report and approval was sought for the improvement priorities for the Directorate as set out in the report.

 

As part of his statutory duties, the Director of Social Services was required by the Welsh Government to produce an annual report on the effectiveness of social care services in the Vale of Glamorgan and plans for improvement.  The report provided an opportunity for the Director to provide people in the Vale with a rounded picture of social services - based on evidence drawn from a wide range of sources such as what users and carers say, key performance indicators, and measurements of progress against the overall goals of the Council.

 

As in previous years, each Head of Service in the Directorate had also provided an annual report, including an assessment of how well each service area was performing along with the priority objectives for improvement in 2014/15.  These were attached at Appendices 2, 3, & 4 to the report along with the Social Services end-of-year performance information that was attached at Appendix 5 to the report.

 

At the meeting Cabinet Members thanked the Director of Social Services and his team for their hard work and dedication to the service and for producing a comprehensive annual progress report. Furthermore the Cabinet Member for Children Services highlighted the excellent progress Children Services had made during the last year.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the Director of Social Services Annual Report 2013/2014 be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the improvement priorities for the Directorate as set out in the report be approved.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1&2)  To endorse the Director of Social Services plans for improvement so that the priorities could be included into the Directorate’s Service Plans.

  

C2512                        SCHOOL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR THE END OF KEY STAGES 4 AND 5 (CS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – LIFELONG LEARNING) -

 

Cabinet was informed of school performance in external examinations in 2014.

 

Our ambition was that educational outcomes were the best in Wales and matched those of the most successful authorities in England with similar socioeconomic profiles.

 

External GCSE examinations were undertaken by pupils at the end of Key Stage 4, in the core subjects of English, Maths and Science as well as in the non-core subjects.  A levels were undertaken at the end of Key Stage 5.

 

Key Stage 4

 

There were many successes to report with reference to KS4 attainment this year. Provisionally the Vale of Glamorgan was ranked 2nd highest in Wales with an overall performance at Level 2+ of 62.2%.  This was a 6.8% rise in performance from 55.4% in 2013 with improved performance at all eight comprehensive schools on this performance measure.

 

Two schools had performance amongst the highest in Wales at level 2+  Cowbridge was  2nd in Wales with 85% of students achieving 5 A*- C grades including English and mathematics, and Stanwell was ranked 4th in Wales with 82% of students achieving this outcome.

 

A breakdown of the overall results (Appendix 1) indicated that with the exception of the L1 Threshold which had decreased by 0.6 pt to 94% and L2 Welsh which had decreased from 83% to 79%, all other indicators had significantly increased. 

 

Appendix 2 attached to the report provided the performance for individual schools in the Vale of Glamorgan (provisional data only).  This demonstrated some significant gains and very little deteriorations .It also included information about benchmarked performance which compared the performance of schools with that of other schools with similar proportions of pupils entitled to free school meals. 

 

Appendix 3 attached to the report provided comparative information with Wales based on provisional data for WJEC entries only. This indicated a 1.2pt increase in the percentage of students achieving A*/A from 22.7% in 2013 to 23.9% in 2014 compared with the National average rise of 0.2pt. For A*-C grades there was a 3.9pt increase in attainment from 67% in 2013 to 70.9% in 2014.

 

The proportion of pupils entitled to a free school meal who achieved the L2+ threshold in the Vale was lower in 2014 (29.9%) compared with 32.5% in 2013 Appendix 4 attached to the report.  The gap between the performance of pupils entitled to free school meals and those who were not widened on this measure of performance from 27.4% to 38.2%. 

 

Key Stage 5

 

Appendix 5 attached to the report showed the school level A Level profile; with all but one school showing an increase in the Level 3 with the exception of St Cyres whilst still performing at 98% was 1pt lower than 2013.

 

Appendix 6 attached to the report was based on provisional data for WJEC entries only.  It showed the A and AS level performance profile set against the all Wales means; grade proportions for AS levels showed a decrease in A and A*- C with a marginal increase in A* to E.

 

A Level performance at A* saw a marginal decrease (0.1%) whilst proportions at grade A and A* to C observed an increase of 1.2 and 1.5 respectively.

 

Schools Causing Concern

 

The three schools in receipt of formal warning letters in 2013 had all improved pupil attainment with Llantwit Major and St Cyres making very good progress and no longer being subject to a warning letter.  Both Llantwit Major and St Cyres responded positively to the challenge and support provided.  Their substantial progress had been underpinned by increasingly strong self-evaluation by the Governing Body and senior leadership team, focussed and strong leadership by the Headteacher and effective use of the challenge and support provided by the Central South Consortium.

 

Barry Comprehensive School had improved its pupil attainment but progress continued to be insufficient and intervention had proceeded. In the event that this intervention had not demonstrated any impact by the summer, we would, at that juncture, consider the establishment of an Interim Executive Board to replace the Governing Body: any such proposal at that time would be the subject of formal consultation with the governing body.

 

The Council would continue to work closely with the Central South Consortium Joint Education Service to monitor individual school progress.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)          T H A T the attainment at Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5 in 2014 be noted and

the schools that had achieved significant improvement be formally congratulated in writing, given their hard work in achieving, their attainment at Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5 in 2014.

 

(2)       T H A T it be noted that in accordance with the School Standards and Organisation Act (2013) Llantwit Major and St Cyres Comprehensive Schools were no longer subject to a formal warning letter, therefore, the Scrutiny School Progress meetings were no longer required to take place and the Scrutiny Committee (Lifelong Learning) was to be thanked for its work undertaken during this process.

 

(3)       T H A T it be noted that formal intervention powers had been used in relation to Barry Comprehensive School.

 

(4)       T H A T the Scrutiny Committee (Lifelong Learning) be requested to set up an individual school progress meeting with Bryn Hafren Comprehensive and Barry Comprehensive School and closely monitor the progress of the Accelerated Improvement Board in Barry Comprehensive School.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note the attainment at Key Stages 4 and 5 in 2014, and congratulate the relevant schools on their attainment.

 

(2)       To note that Llantwit Major and St Cyres comprehensive Schools previously in receipt of formal warning notices have made rapid progress and there was therefore no need for local authority intervention.

 

(3)       To note that although progress had been made by the school it was insufficient to meet all the agreed targets.

 

(4)       To ensure processes were in place to hold schools to account for the quality of education provided.

  

C2513                        SCHOOL CROSSING PATROL (SCPS) (RIPT) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) -      

 

Approval was sought to consult on the possible introduction of a School Crossing Patrol Policy including Site Assessment Criteria, based on national best practice. 

 

Currently there were 43 established permanent School Crossing patrol posts within the Vale of Glamorgan and 41 permanent sites.  Appendix 1 attached to the report provided a list of existing SCP site locations. Whilst a number of sites were currently vacant, there were two mobile officers who cover the highest priority sites that were vacant at any one time. 

 

Road Safety GB (formerly LARSOA) was a national road safety organisation that represented local government road safety teams across the UK.  The Road Safety GB School Crossing Patrol Service Guidelines (2012) were nationally regarded as best practice (See Appendix 2 attached to the report) although they were not statutory for use by local authorities. Formal adoption of the National SCP Guidelines would allow the Council  to fairly and consistently  review all existing sites as well as responding to requests for new SCP sites.  This would allow the Council to consider the future of sites when circumstances change (for example school closure, road or traffic changes or new road safety infrastructure provided or when an SCP officer vacates his or her position).  Full details of the site assessment criteria were outlined in Appendix 2 that was attached to the report.

 

Before deciding whether to implement the School Crossing Patrol Policy including Site Assessment Criteria as outlined in the National Guidelines it was proposed to consult with interested persons on their contents.  The report suggested that Head teachers were consulted on this policy as well as parents, governors and town and community Councils.  It was envisaged that consultation with all these bodies would be both necessary and useful in that this could allow for groups to come forward to assist in delivering a SCP service, particularly at sites or locations where the Council could not currently provide the service.

 

Following the consultation exercise a report of the results of the consultation exercise and proposed way forward would be reported back to Cabinet.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the Road Safety Great Britain Guidelines and its site assessment criteria as set out in Appendix 2 as attached to the report be approved for consultation.

 

(2)       T H A T a further report on the results of the consultation exercise prior to determining whether to implement the Policy and Site Criteria for the Council's School Crossing Patrol Service be presented to Cabinet in due course.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To allow a consultation exercise to be undertaken with interested groups on the Guidelines and site assessment criteria.

 

(2)       To report the results of the consultation exercise in order that Cabinet could determine whether to adopt the Road Safety Great Britain Guidelines and its site assessment criteria as contained at Appendix 2 attached to the report.

  

C2514                        ANNUAL REPORT – SECTION 106 LEGAL AGREEMENTS 2013 – 2014 (RIPT) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) -        

      

Cabinet was informed about progress on Section 106 (Planning Obligation) matters that had arisen in the last financial year (April 2013 - March 2014).

 

The Council had the power to enter into legal agreements with developers under Section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990, to seek contributions from developers to mitigate negative development impacts and facilitate development which might otherwise not occur.

 

In the 12 months between April 2013 and March 2014, a total of 22 planning permissions had been issued, that were subject to section 106 legal agreements, these were outlined at Appendix A attached to the report.

 

The value of the financial contributions in the legal agreements totaled £5,431,630.24. Six of the agreements related to major schemes for residential development at Ferm Goch, Rhoose, St. Athan, Culverhouse Cross, Ystradowen and Llandough. The value of these schemes alone was £4,785,490.23. 

 

The Council’s Section 106 account as at 31/03/14 currently held £2,238,408.41. In addition £173,179.75 was held for ongoing maintenance costs.

 

The Council received financial contributions of £632,818.64 between April 2013 and March 2014.

 

Areas of spend between April 2013 and March 2014 were attached at Appendix B to the report. A number of schemes had been delivered this financial year by the Council with enhancements to walking and cycling, provision of public art, open space enhancements and children's play areas.

 

In addition a number of Sustainable Transport contributions held on account had been “top sliced†by 25% in order to assist in funding public transport services and the Greenlinks community bus service, for the 2014/15, financial year. For 2013/14, the sum amounted to £144,122.66.

 

Moreover “in kind†obligations had also been delivered as an integral part of developments.

 

Furthermore, a number of schemes had also been progressed during the 2013/14 financial year but had yet to be completed. One such suite of proposals that commenced in 2013/14 that would be concluded in 2014/15 was the Central Barry Public Open Space Areas project, which would see investment in a range of park areas within Central Barry.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T progress made on Section 106 matters between April 2013 and March 2014 be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the report be referred to Planning Committee, Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) and Community Liaison Committee for information.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note progress made on section 106 matters between April 2013 and March 2014.

 

(2)       To inform Members of the Planning Committee, Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) and Community Liaison Committee of progress made on section 106 matters between April 2013 and March 2014.

 

C2515                        PROPOSED PENARTH BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT (RIPT) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) -              

 

Cabinet was informed of the current position in relation to the development of a Business Improvement District (BID) for Penarth and to instruct the Returning Officer, to manage and operate a BID ballot. 

 

A Business Improvement District (BID) was a mechanism that had been widely recognised as being successful in bringing local businesses and other stakeholders together with the aim of improving their trading environment and enhancing their profitability. The Welsh Government was supporting the development of some BIDs in Wales to encourage economic development and to help deliver its regeneration framework, Vibrant and Viable Places.

 

A BID was a legally and geographically defined partnership for area improvement and service delivery, over and above what was required by statute by a local authority, and was funded by National Non Domestic Rate (NNDR) paying businesses within the agreed boundary. It was managed and operated by a BID Company - a not for profit company run by and for its members.  Once established, all qualifying NNDR payers within a BID boundary pay an additional levy which was ring-fenced for expenditure within the BID area in the furtherance of regeneration aims identified by the BID.

 

All qualifying NNDR payers in a proposed BID area had an opportunity to vote on whether to progress to forming a BID, and to be successful the vote must meet two tests: more than 50% of votes cast must be in favour of the BID, and a 'yes' vote must represent more than 50% of the aggregate rateable value of votes cast. A BID would normally last 5 years, after which a new ballot would be required.

 

Penarth Town Council had employed an external consultant to progress a town centre based BID and had invited businesses to form a BID steering group.  After a period of consultation, that group was currently at the point of finalising a proposal and business plan.

 

Officers of the Vale Council Council had engaged with the stakeholders involved and guided the development of the BID proposal to ensure that it contained proposals that were deliverable, and did not conflict with policies of this Council.

 

The Draft BID proposal now being finalised embraced the following key principles –

 

-       most businesses within the specified BID boundary would pay a 2% levy over their normal NNDR, within specified criteria

-       all businesses and charities in premises which had a non domestic rateable value in excess of £5 000 would pay the levy

-       Council premises would be charged the levy, and would receive votes at ballot accordingly

-       the Tesco superstore at Penarth Haven would only pay a levy of £5 000 based on a negotiated agreement that disproportionately large units would benefit from a ceiling.

-        it was expected that the BID could realistically raise a net approximate £67 000 per year

-       Penarth Town Council would recover up to £10 000 from the levy in the first year only to reflect part of its investment in the development process for the BID

-       a ballot was likely in  2015, with up to 3 months then needed to establish the BID and start collection of the levy

 

Appendix A attached to the report outlined the proposed BID area which focused around Penarth Town Centre with linkages to the sea front and Penarth Haven area.

 

The Vale Council at this point could follow its legal obligations only. Once correctly served a notice, based on an acceptable BID proposal, the Council would be obliged to carry out a ballot, and if that ballot resulted in a positive vote, to administer the collection of the levy and distribution to the BID. However the Council had options to do more than this.

 

Normal costs for collection of the levy included purchase and annual licensing of additional software to enhance the current NNDR system. There would also be staff implications, and it was estimated that costs in total would be £15 000 in the first year, followed by £10 500 in subsequent years. There was no obligation on the Council to contribute to these costs, although in other areas where BIDs had been implemented it was common for the local authority to make a contribution.

 

The report recommended that the Council supported approximately a third of levy collection costs, to be matched by the Town Council and BID.  This would allow the Council to play a role in the development of the BID and provide encouragement for others to follow.

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for Regeneration, Innovation, Planning and Transportation highlighted that on paragraph 12 of the report, which read:

 

- all businesses and charities in premises which have a non domestic rateable value in excess of £5 000 will pay the levy

 

It should have read

 

- all businesses and charities in premises which have a non domestic rateable value in excess of £6 000 will pay the levy

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the Returning Officer  manage and operate the Business Improvement District (BID) ballot following receipt of formal notice and an acceptable BID proposal as set out in the report and required by regulation.

 

(2)       T H A T the proposed financial commitment of £4 500 from the Regeneration Scheme capital allocation, up to £5 000 ballot costs, and up to £4 000 in revenue in respect of each of the financial years 2016/17 to 2019/20, be endorsed subject to the terms, spending priorities and precise boundary of the BID being agreed with the Council.

 

(3)       T H A T the Head of Legal Services be authorised, in consultation with the Managing Director, Director of Development Services, Leader of the Council and Cabinet Member for Regeneration, Innovation, Planning and Transportation, to prepare and execute a Baseline Agreement and Operating Agreement as set out in the report.

 

(4)       T H A T the Director of Development Services be granted delegated authority, in consultation with the Managing Director and Cabinet Member for Regeneration, Innovation, Planning and Transportation, to agree amendments and/or additions sought by the BID proposer to the terms, funding priorities and precise boundary of the proposed BID.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To comply with the Council's statutory duty.

 

(2)       To ensure that the Council as a key partner provided a source of support and funding to Penarth Town Council and the BID in the development and implementation of the proposed Penarth BID.

 

(3)       To ensure formal approval by the Council of the proposal documents in compliance with its statutory duty.

 

(4)       To permit amendments/additions as required to the proposal documents and to safeguard the Council's interests as a key partner in the project.

 

C2516                        ACTIVE TRAVEL (WALES) ACT 2013 DIRECTION, 2ND OCTOBER 2014 (RIPT) (SCRUNTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) -           

           

On the 2 October, 2014 the Council received a Direction from the Welsh Government (WG) setting out the duties placed upon the Council for the provision of routes designed for walking and cycling, as well as Statutory Guidance for Delivering the Active Travel (Wales) Act which set out the processes and procedures to follow to deliver the requirements of the Act as outlined in the links below;

 http://wales.gov.uk/topics/transport/walking-cycling/activetravelact/implementation/?lang=en.

 

The Act makes specific provision as follows:

 

For local authorities to produce maps of existing active travel routes and related facilities in a local authority’s area (the existing routes map) and to submit these maps to the Welsh Ministers for approval within one year of the date of the Direction;

 

For local authorities to produce maps of the new and improved active travel routes and related facilities needed  to create integrated networks for active travel in a local authority’s area (the integrated network map) and to submit these maps to the Welsh Ministers for approval within three years of the date of the Direction;

 

Requiring  local  authorities  to  have  regard  to  integrated  network  maps  in preparing transport policies and to ensure that there are new and improved active travel routes and related facilities;

Requiring the Welsh Ministers and local authorities to report on active travel in Wales;

 

Requiring  the  Welsh  Ministers and  local  authorities, in carrying out certain functions under the Highways Act 1980, to take reasonable steps to enhance the provision made for walkers and cyclists and to have regard to the needs of walkers and cyclists in the exercise of certain other functions;

Requiring the Welsh Ministers and local authorities to exercise their functions under this Act so as to promote active travel journeys and secure new and improved active travel routes and related facilities.

 

Annex A within the WG Statutory Guidance sets out the powers and duties that were created by the Act, and the bodies affected by the powers and the duties. Annex B within the Guidance sets out the Localities in which the duties apply, and Annex C states the features to be depicted on the existing route map.  Full details were provided in terms of the policy context for the Act, specific details to be included on maps, the method of publication and monitoring of performance.  Advice was also provided on taking forward schemes and the role of local authorities in working with landowners as well as promoting active travel.

 

The integrated network maps should set out the plans of the local authority for the next 15 years. The integrated network map was mainly a tool for local authorities to enhance their forward planning of active travel, enabling them to align their plans across different services.  It would be of interest to the wider public, and as such would need to be available and accessible. However, it is primarily meant to be used to support infrastructure development and planning.

 

As indicated above in paragraph 7, the Act required that the maps were submitted to the Welsh Ministers for approval. The existing routes maps must be submitted within a year of commencement of section 3 of the Act and the integrated network maps must be submitted within three years of commencement of section 4 of the Act.

 

25 September 2014 – Act Commences

25 September 2015 – Submission of the existing route maps

25 September 2017 – submission of the integrated network map and resubmission of the existing route map

25 September 2020 – resubmission of the existing route map and the integrated network map.

 

To achieve best value for money, the Welsh Government had contracted an initial survey of active travel routes and facilities in the designated localities. There would also be a nationally available data management system. This system would collate and display this data, enable the local authorities to expand the data held, and create both their existing route maps and integrated network maps. However, this information was not likely to be made available to Councils until early next year, which would have a timing implication in terms of meeting deadlines for submissions of the existing route maps.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the Active Travel (Wales) Act 2013 Direction 2nd October 2014 be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the timescales in which this work is required to be carried out be noted.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note the Active Travel (Wales) Act 2013 Direction, 2nd October 2014 being placed upon the Council.

 

(2)       To note the legal duties that have been placed on the Council within the specified timescale.

 

C2517                        MATTER WHICH THE CHAIRMAN HAD DECIDED WAS URGENT

RESOLVED - T H A T the following matter, which the Chairman had decided was urgent for the reason given beneath the minute heading be considered.

 

C2518            CAPITAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE PERIOD 1ST APRIL TO 31ST AUGUST 2014 (REF) –

 

Item which the Chairman had decided was urgent by virtue of the reason to allow the schemes to proceed.

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) on 15 October, 2014 considered the above report of the Managing Director.

 

Appendix 1 to the report set out the details of the financial progress on the above Programme as at 31st August 2014.  For all schemes where it was evident that the full year’s budget would not be spent during the year, the relevant officers were required to provide an explanation for the shortfall and this should be taken to the earliest available meeting of the Cabinet. 

 

In addition to the above, Appendix 2 provided non-financial information on capital construction schemes with a budget of over £100,000 and where a budget shown in Appendix 1 was more than £100,000, but was made up of several schemes that individually were less than £100,000, these schemes were not included in Appendix 2.

 

Of those schemes reported these related to Development Service Services and related to the following:

 

           S106 Paget Road to Penarth Portway Woodland Path – following the completion of the required consultation process it had been agreed that up to £40,000 of the Penarth Heights S106 monies could be used to re-establish the footpath link between Paget Road and Penarth Marina.  Cabinet had been requested to approve the inclusion of this scheme in its Capital Programme.

           Barry Island Light Art Commission – the Arts Council of Wales had approved a grant in the amount of £50,000 for an artist designed lighting scheme in the ceiling of Eastern Shelter, Barry Island.  Cabinet would also be requested to approve the inclusion of this scheme in its Capital Programme.

 

In regard to variances between actual spend to date and profiled spend to date, the following was reported:

 

           Disabled Facilities Grants – there was a variance between profiled budget and actual spend due to the profiled budget being based on historical patterns of spend, however, changes to processes within the service in 2014/15 had led to a more consistent pattern of approvals and spend throughout the financial year.

           Local Road Network Improvements – this scheme had been subject to delay during the current financial year, however £200,000 had been committed during September and a full spend was still projected in the current financial year.

           WHQS Works – there was likely to be a variance in the WHQS expenditure as the extent of the works required in a property was not known until the works commenced.  In addition, less had been spent than was projected for Rewire schemes, Kitchen Replacements, Bathroom works and schemes in Non Traditional Properties.  More had been spent than was projected for Central Heating works and General Improvement schemes, the total budget accordingly was unaffected.  The allocation of the WHQS budget would be reviewed as part of the forthcoming Housing Business Plan. 

 

Having regard to the above and related issues, it was

 

RECOMMENDED – T H A T the inclusion of the undermentioned schemes be endorsed and referred to the Cabinet for approval:

 

           S106 Paget Road to Penarth Portway Woodland Path – increase the Capital Programme by £40,000 funded by Penarth Heights S106 monies

          Barry Island Light Art Commission – increase the Capital Programme by £50,000 Grant Funding from Arts Council Wales to fund this scheme.

 

Reason for recommendation

 

To allow schemes to proceed in the current or future financial years.

 

Cabinet having considered the recommendations from the Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources)

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the inclusion of the undermentioned schemes be approved:

 

           S106 Paget Road to Penarth Portway Woodland Path – increase the Capital Programme by £40,000 funded by Penarth Heights S106 monies.

 

           Barry Island Light Art Commission – increase the Capital Programme by £50,000 Grant Funding from Arts Council Wales to fund this scheme.

 

Reason for decision

 

To allow the schemes to proceed in the current or future financial years.