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Agenda Item No.

CABINET

Minutes of a meeting held on 26 January, 2015

 

Present : Councillor N. Moore (Chairman), Councillor S.C. Egan (Vice – Chairman); Councillors: B.E. Brooks, L. Burnett, R. Curtis, C.P.J. Elmore and G. John.

 

Also Present: Councillor Dr I. Johnson.

 

C2608  MINUTES –

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the meeting held on 12 January, 2015 be approved as a correct record.

 

C2609  DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST –

 

No declarations of interest were received.

 

C2610   CORPORATE PARENTING PANEL - 

 

The Minutes of the Corporate Parenting Panel meeting held on the 15 September, 2014 were submitted.

 

Present: Councillor S. Egan (Chairman), Councillor E Williams, Councillor R. Traherne, Councillor V Hartrey, P.Evans (Director of Social and Care Services), Rachael Evans (Head of Children & Young People Services), K Conway (Operational Manager - Social Services), C. Limbrick (Operational Manager), Martine Coles (LAC Education Coordinator) Mark Petherick (Cabinet Officer).

 

     Actions
(1)  Apologies for absence  
1.1

Councillor R. Bertin, Councillor C Elmore, Councillor J Birch.

 

The Chairman for the meeting was Councillor S.Egan

 
(2)  Minutes and Matters Arising 10 June 2014  
2.1  The minutes of 10 June 2014 meeting were agreed as a correct record. All Agreed
(3)  Annual Placement Review – Rachael Evans  
3.1  Rachael Evans presented the Annual Placement Review report, that was attached at Appendix 1 to the minutes.

 

The purpose of the report was to outline the actions taken within children and young people services during 2013/14 with regard to placement provision for Looked after Children (LAC) and to outline the Childrens and Young Peoples Services plans for 2014/15

 
(4)  End of Key Stage 4 for Looked after Children Performance 2013 – 2014 – Martine Coles.  
4.1 Martine Coles presented a paper on the End of Key Stage 4 performance for Looked after Children Performance 2013 – 2014 to the panel.

 

Table 1 attached at Appendix 2 to the minutes illustrated the provisional GCSE results for Vale LAC educated in Vale schools and those educated out of county. Table 2 illustrated the provisional data for the end of Key Stage 4.

 

In 2014, there had been an increase in GCSEs (Table 3) and other qualifications for young people who were Looked After by the Local Authority. The increase was the result of tracking of Year 11 pupils and collaboration with schools and other providers to secure qualifications.

 

The Looked After Children education team had been providing differentiated targeted support in Vale schools to improve learner outcomes. The support had been in partnership with the young peoples’ social workers and their carers.

 

The 8 in county young people who were not engaged had complex issues. All 8 young people who were not engaged were currently being supported by the Vale’s Careers Service into training or employment; this would reduce the risk of them becoming NEET. The support for the other 12 children was also in place

 
(5)  Any Other Business  
5.1  PE put forward an agenda item for the next meeting titled

 

• Report on the Adoption Service.

 

No other business was reported

 
(6)  Next Meeting Dates 2014  
6.1

 Monday 15th December 2014 at 5pm

Cabinet Meeting Room

All Agreed


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RESOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the Corporate Parenting Panel meeting held on 15 September, 2014 be noted

 

C2611  DRAFT LOCAL TRANSPORT PLAN 2015 (REF) -  

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) on 6 January, 2015 considered the above report.

 

Cabinet approval had been sought on 1st December, 2014 to approve for consultation purposes a Local Transport Plan (LTP) for the Vale of Glamorgan and to set out the process by which the LTP was to be submitted to Welsh Government in January 2015.  Appendix 2 to the report contained the draft Local Transport Plan 2015-2020 which had been prepared to meet Welsh Government guidelines and which was to be submitted to Welsh Government for consideration by 31st January, 2015. 

 

The Principal Transport and Road Safety Officer advised Committee that in developing an integrated approach Welsh Government expected local authorities to work with the Plan to secure an efficient and effective transport system for Wales, where good connections for national and international markets allowed businesses to prosper and where everyone could access the opportunities they needed to lead healthy and fulfilling lives.  The report also outlined that the National Transport Plan was expected to run from April 2015. 

 

The consultation on the LTP had commenced on 18th December, 2014 and would close on 22nd January, 2015.  The Scrutiny Committee itself was part of the consultation process.  The final document was to be presented to Full Council for adoption in March 2015 following approval by Welsh Government in February 2015.  Given the timescales involved the report also sought the authority of the Director of Development Services in consultation with the Cabinet Member for Regeneration, Innovation, Planning and Transportation to consider the responses to the consultation and to make appropriate amendments to the Plan prior to submission to Welsh Government.  A further report was to be presented to Cabinet and Council after January to advise of the responses to the consultation, the feedback from Welsh Government and the final LTP. 

 

In response to a query regarding consultation, the officer advised that the Council had to consult with the City Region Board, Neighbouring Local Authorities, Health and Education and that no other specific consultation was expressed other than the Council’s own legal requirements to satisfy itself as an authority.  In considering the report regional and local plans were discussed which included the Local Development Plan, the Regional Transport Plan, the existing National Transport Plan, the Task and Finish Group recommendations as contained within the Plan itself.  Cabinet had also resolved that a further report outlining the results of the draft LTP consultation process and the feedback of Welsh Government be presented to the Scrutiny Committee during February/March 2015 before final approval being sought from Full Council.

 

Following consideration of the report a number of questions were raised as outlined below.  In referring to Reference 1 on page 13 and the outcome to improve access to jobs and the limited bus service in the rural Vale of Glamorgan, a Member queried whether there was evidence that people did not accept jobs because of transport problems.   In response, the officer advised that Welsh Government evidence available which emphasised the difficulties for people living in rural areas and that she would obtain the national statistics and forward copies to all Members. In response to a further question as to whether unemployment was ‘worse’ in rural as opposed to urban areas, again, the officer agreed to obtain the information and e-mail the details to all Members.

 

With regard to community transport and the Greenlinks Service, a Member requested that a comprehensive assessment of all transport throughout all Departments be undertaken in order to make best use of Council resources.  Members were informed that since the Greenlinks Service had been in operation it was increasing in demand and although it was heavily subsidised, the more people used the service the more efficient it was becoming. Further routes were also being identified which would again assist with value for money and capacity issues.  Welsh Government had also provided financial assistance for another pilot scheme to be undertaken with one of the school routes being utilised for the project.  The Council would also be considering diverting other vehicles to assist such services and a 16-21 concessionary pass scheme was currently being considered. In referring to the reference in the report of 5kms being the accepted criteria to be measured for acceptable walking distances, Committee was advised that this was taken from the legal walking distance  related to school transport provision as stated in legislation. 

 

A Member also suggested that the report should include reference to rail transport but was advised that Welsh

Government guidelines stated that rail services were not to be part of the document.

 

Following further discussion, Members also recognised the conflict with increasing bus provision as it may exacerbate congestion issues and the Council may wish to consider integrated transport and the continuity of transport in all its forms not just two or three examples as identified in page 39 of the document.  In referring to congestion issues, Members were informed that “bus corridors” were a series of measures designed to improve bus traffic flow.  It was subsequently recommended that the Plan should include a full description of the terminology “bus corridor” and the various measures that can be used.

 

In referring to the Culverhouse Cross to Cardiff Airport Bus Priority scheme at page 32 of the report, a Member stated that many people had not been happy with the T9 service as this had not been widely used and queried whether the introduction of the new scheme would exacerbate the problem.  The officer, however, informed Committee that the scheme referred to in the report was not the T9 service but that it was a general service from Culverhouse Cross to Cardiff Airport, in the main, for the Enterprise Zone and access for all residents to Cardiff.    Some Members were also keen to ensure that whilst improving the flow of bus transport the Council needed to be mindful of not having a negative impact on traffic flow.  However, it was agreed that some future improvements could have a small negative impact in some areas and therefore it would be a balancing act as to the best course of action to be pursued.  Officers would also make Members aware of any negative impacts of schemes to be introduced as well as the positives of every scheme which would be detailed in future documents.

 

The Chairman took the opportunity to inform Members of the number of recommendations that had been made by the Task and Finish Group, some of which were being addressed in the document.  The officer advised that a number of other recommendations made by the Group e.g. a cycle route for Gilbert Lane had not been able to be assessed in the timescale provided and as such they had not been included in the document but had been identified to be considered in the future.  The Chairman also advised that a report updating Committee on the progress of the Task and Finish Group’s recommendations was scheduled to be reported to the Scrutiny Committee over the forthcoming months and that she would welcome in depth discussion on the recommendations at that time. 

 

A local Ward Member took the opportunity to commend the officer on the new 321 Bus Service from Llantwit Major to Talbot Green although recognising that further work was required in respect of rural transport and that the Green Links provision was only part of the answer.  Further concern was raised in relation to the junction at Pentre Meyrick Cross where a number of heavy vehicles were now appearing to utilise the junction from Llandow, advising that if further developments were to be made, the junction would need to be reassessed for access.  In response, the officer advised that a Highways element was contained within the Plan, which addressed the fact that where new developments were being progressed, additional schemes may need to be considered and, as a result, the LTP would need to be amended accordingly, where necessary.

 

Members, in welcoming the report, the reference to Active Travel and in accepting that the rail service was not to be included in the document as it was to be contained within the National Transport Plan currently out for consultation, were advised to respond directly to that consultation, if they so wished.

 

It was subsequently

 

RECOMMENDED - T H A T the draft Local Transport Plan 2015, as appended to the report be accepted, with Cabinet being requested to include inserting a definition in respect of the term “bus corridors” and the negative impacts of schemes as well as the positives.

 

Reason for recommendation

 

In recognition of the consultation process on the draft Local Transport Plan 2015 and in order to provide clear and further detail to the public on the definition of the term “bus corridor” and the impact of various schemes.”

 

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Cabinet having considered the recommendation of the Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment)

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

(2) T H A T a definition of the term “bus corridors” be inserted into the draft Local Transport Plan 2015 in order to provide clear and further detail to the public, and that the plan highlighted both the negative and positive impacts of the various schemes.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To note the contents of the report.

 

(2) In recognition of the consultation process on the draft Local Transport Plan 2015 and in order to provide clear and further detail to the public on the definition of the term “bus corridor” and the negative and positive impact of the various schemes.

 

C2612  OUTCOME AGREEMENT 2013-16: ACHIEVEMENT OF THE FULL GRANT AWARD FOR YEAR 1 AND PROGRESS UPDATE ON YEAR 2 (2014/15) TARGETS (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ALL) - 

 

Cabinet was advised of the achievement of the full grant award for Year 1 of the Outcome Agreement (2013-2016) between the Vale of Glamorgan Council and Welsh Government (WG).

 

Following negotiations with WG, the Outcome Agreement 2013-16 was agreed and signed off by the Minister for Public Services on 1 April, 2014. A copy of the final Agreement was reported to Cabinet on 28 April 2014.

 

The Outcome Agreement covered 5 areas: supporting the local economy, increasing school attainment, improving the lives of older people, improving social housing and reducing landfill. The areas were aligned with the WG Programme for Government and accounted for 70% of the grant award. The remaining 30% was based on assessment of the Council's corporate health, informed by our lead regulators, the Wales Audit Office.

 

Payment of the grant award to the Council was according to the level of achievement of its outcomes as outlined within the Agreement, with full achievement securing the Council an incentive grant of £1,232,000 each year over the life of the Agreement.

 

Quarterly performance reports presented by directorate to the Corporate Management Team, Scrutiny and Cabinet ensured that the Council monitored progress against all key priorities as outlined in the Corporate Plan 2013-17, the Outcome Agreement 2013-2016 and the Improvement Plan Part 1 2014/15.

 

On his review of the Vale's performance for 2013-14 the Minister for Public Services concluded that the Council had qualified for the full 70%. Also based on the criteria set within the guidance the Council was not currently subject to intervention or support under the terms of the Local Government (Wales) Measure 2009 and therefore qualified for the 30% component of the grant.  The full payment of £1,232,000 had been made to the Council.

 

Progress against the Council's 2014/15 key priorities including the Outcome Agreement was reported to Cabinet on 17 November, 2014 as part of corporate quarterly performance monitoring arrangements.  Appendix 2 attached to the report contained all actions and agreed targets for all measures for year 2 of the Agreement. Annual measures would be reported at the end of the financial year.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T achievement of the Outcome Agreement grant award in full for Year 1  2013/14 as outlined in the Minister for Public Services letter attached at Appendix 1 to the report be noted. 

 

(2) T H A T the overall progress made to date in achieving 2014/15 targets as outlined in paragraphs 10-16 of the report be noted.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To note the successful achievement of the full incentive grant from Welsh Government.

 

(2) To ensure Outcome Agreement targets for 2014/15 were effectively monitored.

 

C2613  ENERGY COMMISSION RE-INVESTMENT SCHEME (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) - 

 

Approval was sought to establish an Energy Fund for investment in energy and water efficiency projects in Council buildings.

 

The Council was obligated to participate in the Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC) scheme. The scheme required the Council to annually report on the energy consumption and associated carbon dioxide emissions within its non-domestic buildings and to pay for each year an associated amount. In 2013-14 the amount paid was £126K whereas in 2014-15 the amount would be around £240k as street lighting was included in Phase 2 of the CRC.

 

The Council’s carbon management strategy and implementation programme was overseen by the Carbon Management Group and reported through the Operational Manager (Property) to the Sustainable Development Working Group.  In addition the Council, with Local Service Board partners, had agreed to collectively reduce emissions from its buildings in the Vale by 3% per annum.  This was in line with Welsh Government national targets for a 3% reduction in emissions per annum.

 

The Council satisfied the mandatory qualifying criteria for the CRC scheme and submitted its first CRC report in July 2011, covering the 2010-11 financial year.  The scheme encouraged participants to take up voluntary Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) facilities in order to improve the accuracy of billing and to benefit via the 'early action metric' within the CRC scheme.   The Council proceeded with the installation of AMR which had helped with the provision of more robust data concerning energy use.

 

The report outlined that it was only since AMR had been installed that enough quality data had been collected to produce reasonably accurate annual energy use figures.  This had helped to inform a range of energy savings schemes funded through the Salix finance arrangement. The Council had participated in this arrangement since 2009 which provided interest free loans for qualifying energy efficiency projects for the Council’s buildings.  Further details on how the Salix schemes operated could be found via the following link http://salixfinance.co.uk/loans/welsh-loans.

 

Since June 2009 the Council had spent over £700k from the Salix fund with a further £110k of projects agreed and awaiting installation and a further £100k worth of projects considered viable and awaiting agreement from budget holders.  The projects installed or awaiting installation were predicted to save the Council £195k per year in fuel costs and reduce emissions by 1,330 tonnes per annum.  The lifetime savings for Salix match funded measured was predicted to be £4.2 million and 28.5 thousand tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions.

 

A full list of the type of projects that the energy fund could be used for was attached at Appendix 1 to the report.  Appendix 2 attached to the report contained budget figures and expected savings for an initial list of projects that on approval could be progressed as funds would allow.  Completion of the schemes would result in a reduction of 1% per annum in carbon dioxide emissions for the authority and around a £26k annual reduction in electricity costs.

 

The energy fund could also be used to provide additional discretionary funding for projects that did not quite achieve the 5 year payback required to attract a Salix loan but still achieved an 8 year payback as dictated by the rules within the Salix scheme.  This would allow more flexibility in the type of energy efficiency projects taken forward. 

 

A key driver in determining which projects to fund would be those that reduced energy consumption figures and met the Council's targets for reducing carbon emissions. Another factor in determining which projects to fund would be to spread the benefits across a number of different buildings in recognition of the contributions made to the fund by a number of services.

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for the Environment and Visible Services commented that the Carbon Management Strategy was introduced by the previous coalition administration back in 2007 and he was pleased that work on this project had continued.

 

He further highlighted paragraph 15 of the report that estimated that a 50 kW photovoltaic installation would cost in the region of £80k but might produce a 20 year saving of approximately £270k, he also commented on paragraph 11 of the report explaining that photovoltaic panels had been reported to be operating well after 30 years and this could increase savings even further.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T delegated authority be granted to the Managing Director in consultation with the Leader to develop the detailed criteria and conditions for use of the Energy Fund in order to improve the energy and water efficiency of Council buildings. 

 

(2) T H A T the report be forwarded to Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) for information and that further details of the Energy Fund and its use be included in the Sustainable Development progress reports presented to the Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) twice a year.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1&2) To enable the Council to improve the energy and water efficiency of Council buildings through the use of an Energy Fund and to facilitate monitoring of the Fund and its use.

 

C2614  SKY LANTERNS (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION) -  

 

Cabinet was asked to consider the introduction of a prohibition on the release of Sky Lanterns from Council owned land.

 

In recent years Local Authorities, charities and other agencies have lobbied the Government calling for the ban of sky lanterns in the UK. The Government decided not to prohibit Sky Lanterns, but in August 2014 the Trading Standards Institute, following discussions between Government and industry, issued an industry code of practice to provide guidance for manufacturers, importers, distributors and retailers of sky lanterns, covering their manufacture, and warnings and instructions that must be provided.

 

Several Local Authorities in Wales including Conwy, Caerphilly and Pembroke already had bans in place prohibiting the use of Sky Lanterns on their land. Also,

National retailers including Tesco and Poundland had now stopped the sale of Sky Lanterns in their stores.

 

The report highlighted the following concerns with regard to the use of Sky Lanterns:

 

• Sky Lanterns presented a significant fire hazard especially where the lantern was unable to stay upright in the air due to obstacles or the wind; the paper may ignite and become a fire hazard.  The lantern may then travel to the ground whilst still lit and become a risk to crops, woodland and property. 

• Animal Welfare - after contact with the ground the leftover thin wire frame will rust away very slowly, remaining a hazard to pets, wild animals and livestock that may ingest the material. 

• Impact on the environment - the littering left as a result of the lantern will impact the environment on both land and sea. 

• Aviation - Sky Lanterns were a concern particularly given the location of Cardiff Airport.  According to civil aviation authorities, there was a danger of lanterns being sucked into engines while airborne. On the ground, lantern debris had the potential to cause damage to aircraft engines, tyres and fuselage.

 

At present there was no national legislation available to control the problem of Sky Lantern use and therefore it was up to each Council to consider the issue for themselves. The report proposed that the Vale of Glamorgan Council introduced a ban on the release of Sky Lanterns from all its land, including schools premises.

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for the Environment and Visible Services welcomed this report and highlighted the dangers posed by the use of Sky Lanterns to the Environment and Animal Welfare and he was pleased that the Council was following other organisations opposing their use including, the Aviation Authorities and the Emergency Services. He said that these were small steps but they were in the right direction.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the Vale of Glamorgan Council prohibits the release of Sky Lanterns from all Council land, including schools, with immediate effect.

 

(2) T H A T the prohibition on the use of Sky Lanterns would also apply to events organised by third parties that are held on Council property.

 

(3) T H A T information be provided to the media and details of the prohibition displayed on the Council website.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To prevent the use of Sky Lanterns on all Council owned land to avoid the risk of fire and the danger to animals from the remaining metal wiring.

 

(2) To ensure events organised by third parties were included in the prohibition.

 

(3) To ensure the prohibitions were effectively publicised.

 

C2615  RESHAPING SERVICES – A NEW CHANGE PROGRAMME FOR THE COUNCIL (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) - 

 

Cabinet was provided with an update on the development of the Reshaping Services Programme, and approval was sought to undertake detailed service reviews of those services identified for tranches one and two of the Reshaping Services Programme.

 

In August 2014, Cabinet agreed in principle to instituting a Reshaping Services strategy and change programme. The programme was the Council's proactive response to central government's austerity drive that had created a period of unprecedented financial pressure in the public sector. The Council's budget had been under pressure for a number of years with £28.8 million in savings identified between 2010/11 and 2014/15. Further substantial savings were necessary in 2015/16, 2016/17 and 2017/18. The latest projections now estimated that this would equate to a reduction of over £7 million in 2015/16 and approximately £24.6 million in total over the next three years. Failure to deliver the required level of savings would not be an option for the Council. According to many analysts the period of austerity was likely to continue for councils and the public sector.

 

The scale of the challenges meant that a "business as usual" approach, however well managed would not be enough. A strategy that consisted solely of incremental cuts to budgets would simply lead to a steady decline in the quality and availability of public services, dissatisfaction among those who use the service and poor staff morale. The challenge was therefore to consider alternative delivery models for services across the Council.

 

Cabinet approved the Reshaping Services strategy on the 3 November, 2014. The Strategy was developed following a programme of consultation and engagement with key stakeholder groups, including briefing sessions for Members and Officers.

 

The Reshaping Services strategy provided a framework for the Council to work within for the next three to five years.

 

The aim of the strategy was 'to reshape the Council to enable it to meet the future needs of citizens of the Vale of Glamorgan within the context of unprecedented financial challenges.' The objectives were:

 

• To identify alternative ways of delivering services which provided better outcomes for citizens and/or more efficient means of delivery.

• To meet the future financial challenges while mitigating the impact of cuts on service users.

• To develop the Council and its partners to ensure they were able to meet future challenges.

 

Stage one of the challenge process was overseen by the challenge group which comprised of the Leader, Deputy Leader and portfolio holder of the service area. The challenge group was supported by the Managing Director, Head of Finance, Head of Human Resources, Head of Performance & Development, the relevant Service Director and Executive Director of the Vale Council for Voluntary Services.

 

The challenge process was split into three stages that covered the following areas outlined below.

Stage One

 

• Service Area Baseline Assessments completed for all service areas.

• Challenge group sessions.

•  Scrutiny and engagement on identified opportunities.

• Initial proposals to Cabinet and Scrutiny Committees.

 

Stage Two

• In-depth assessment of opportunities in tranches of projects.

• Approval and scrutiny of business cases.

 

Stage Three

• Implementation, monitoring and review.

 

The challenge group would meet to review all Council services and identify proposals for those services which should progress to stage two of the process. Cabinet approval would subsequently be sought for both the development of the detailed business cases at stage two and for those projects that were proposed to move to stage three (implementation). The challenge group met during September – November 2014 and it was intended that the challenge process would be repeated in September – November 2015.

 

The Programme Board would manage the overall programme in all its aspects. Members of the Board would consist of the Leader, Corporate Management Team, the Head of Human Resources and the Executive Director of the Vale Council for Voluntary Services. The sponsor of the programme was the Managing Director. Appendix A attached to the report illustrated the proposed governance arrangements for the Reshaping Services programme and projects.

 

The Council’s Corporate Management Team (CMT) would be responsible for the operational delivery of the Reshaping Services programme. Service Directors and Heads of Service would be tasked to use their expertise to challenge, review and identify alternative means of achieving objectives. Their role was to champion change and not to instinctively defend the status quo.

 

During the course of the Programme, update reports would be made to various stakeholders, including the Local Service Board, Community Joint Liaison Committee and Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee.

 

During Stage one of the Challenge process, Service Area Baseline Assessment and Cost Centre Analysis documents were completed by Service Directors for each service area (circa 70 areas were identified across the Authority). The documents highlighted the current performance, cost, risks, trends and opportunities as identified by Council service areas themselves. The Cost Centre Analysis documents included the existing savings targets which were contained in the initial budget proposals. These documents had been summarised into the following appendices:

 

• Appendix B – Development Services

• Appendix C – Learning & Skills

• Appendix D – Resources

• Appendix E – Social Services

• Appendix F – Visible Services & Housing

 

The Service Area Baseline Assessment documents and Cost Centre Analysis documents were presented to the challenge group by the relevant Service Director. This information, in addition to the group’s discussion and experience, was used to inform the development of the proposals outlined in the report as to how the programme should proceed.

 

Two workstreams had been developed to progress opportunities: a corporate projects workstream and a service specific projects workstream as described below. It was anticipated that the third (not for profit) sector would be involved across all corporate and service specific projects.

 

Corporate Workstream Projects - The challenge group identified a series of opportunities that would benefit from a corporate-wide response and these would be progressed as corporate workstream projects as follows.

 

• Town and Community Councils

• Demand Management

• Effectiveness of Spend

• Income Generation

 

Service Specific Projects Workstream - In addition to the corporate projects workstream described above, the challenge group considered specific service areas for possible projects.

 

• Existing Service Analysis

• Opportunity Analysis

• Financial Appraisal & Prioritising Projects

• Impact Analysis

 

Reshaping Services Programme Plan & Delivery Arrangements

Programme Plan

 

Appendix I as attached to the report described the various elements of the proposed initial overall Reshaping Services programme.

 

Whilst the service areas identified for inclusion in tranches one and two had been selected on the basis of the initial high-level assessment of their ability to benefit from reshaping via an alternative method of service delivery or to generate efficiencies, the business cases developed at stage two would consider the entirety of the opportunities offered within each of the service areas.

 

Subject to approval, the first tranche of projects in the programme plan would be developed as outlined in the following timetable. The timetable was indicative only as the time taken would depend on the service and complexity of the business case/implementation. The indicative timetable had been designed so that, as far as possible, savings resulting from projects were realised from the 2016/17 financial year.

 

Cabinet Approval to proceed to stage two February 2015
Stage 2 Business Case development February – August 2015
Cabinet / Scrutiny Committee Consideration of Business Case Autumn 2015
Implementation of Approved Projects January 2016 – July 2016


The challenge process had been designed to be repeated throughout the duration of the programme to ensure on-going and rigorous challenge of all service areas on a continuing basis. This process would allow lessons learnt from projects in the Vale of Glamorgan and elsewhere to inform future tranches of projects.

 

It was intended that the challenge group would therefore meet again next for the second round of challenge sessions in September 2015. The initial proposals resulting from these challenge sessions would form the third tranche of services to be reshaped and would be defined by February 2016 for Cabinet’s consideration.

 

The report also outlined the projects that, subject to approval, would proceed in tranche two. The indicative timetable for tranche two projects was outlined below and was subject to the same caveats as for tranche one. The indicative timetable had been designed so that, as far as possible, savings resulting from projects were realised from the 2017/18 financial year.

 

Cabinet Approval to proceed to stage two February 2015
Stage 2 Business Case development January – August 2016
Cabinet/Scrutiny Committee Consideration of Business Case Autumn 2016
Implementation of Approved Projects January 2017 – June 2017
There was recognition that the issues raised by the Reshaping Services strategy would be new to many Elected Members, Council Officers and partners. The programme was intended to consider fundamentally different ways of delivering services and this would require a change in culture for the Council.

At the meeting the Leader commented that the Council was committed to the reshaping of services and this was the next stage of this ongoing process.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the programme plan, governance arrangements and service reviews proposed for tranches one and two of the Reshaping Services programme as outlined in the report be approved as the basis for consideration by Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources).

 

(2) T H A T the report be referred to Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources).

 

(3) T H A T the report be referred to Community Liaison Committee, Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee and the Local Service Board.

 

(4) T H A T the detailed service review work be undertaken as outlined in the report and reported back to Cabinet for approval prior to implementation.

 

(5) T H A T delegated authority be granted to the Managing Director, in consultation with the Leader, to procure external services as required to support the development and delivery of the Reshaping Services programme as outlined in the report.

 

(6) T H A T further progress reports be brought back to Cabinet and Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) in due course to provide updates on the progress of the Reshaping Services programme.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To consider the proposed approach to delivering the Reshaping Services programme and for work to commence on developing business cases for services to be reviewed following consideration by Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources).

 

(2) To ensure any comments from the Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) be referred back to Cabinet to inform a final decision on the implementation of the Reshaping Services programme as outlined in the report.

 

(3) To refer the report to the Community Liaison Committee, Voluntary Sector Joint Liaison Committee and Local Service Board.

 

(4) To enable detailed service reviews to be undertaken and documented in accordance with the Council’s project management methodology and ensure Cabinet approve implementation.

 

(5) To ensure appropriate resources were available to undertake the work required.

 

(6) To ensure Cabinet and Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) were kept fully informed of the progress being made on the programme.

 

C2616  EAGLESWELL PRIMARY SCHOOL, LLANTWIT MAJOR (CSS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – LIFELONG LEARNING) -

 

Approval was sought to formally declare Eagleswell School as a surplus site in view of the pending relocation of the staff and pupils to Llantwit Learning Community in September 2016 and to obtain the necessary authority to undertake demolition works, to dispose of the site and to increase the capital programme accordingly.

 

Cabinet at its meeting held on 18 November, 2013 resolved (Cabinet Minute C2081):

 

(1) That it be agreed to create a Llantwit Learning Community delivering major  investment in Llantwit Major Comprehensive School and a new 420 place   primary school on the adjacent site created from the amalgamation of   Eagleswell and Llanilltud Fawr primary schools.

 

(2) That a consultation exercise takes place from 16 December, 2013 for a   period of 8 weeks on a proposal to create a new 420 place primary school as  part of the Llantwit Learning Community and amalgamate Eagleswell and   Llanilltud Fawr primary schools.

 

(3) That the report be referred to Scrutiny Committee (Lifelong Learning) and   then Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) as the lead Scrutiny   Committee, for consideration as part of the consultation process.

 

Following a full statutory consultation process, Cabinet approved implementation of the proposal to amalgamate Eagleswell and Llanilltud Fawr Primary Schools from September 2015 (Cabinet Minute C2370). The school would initially operate on separate sites pending the opening of the new 420 place school building in September 2016.

 

This will result in Eagleswell Primary School becoming vacant and surplus to requirements at the end of July 2016. It is proposed to regenerate the vacated site by marketing and disposing of the land for mixed use (retail and residential) development (subject to planning).

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T Eagleswell School be declared as a surplus site.

 

(2) T H A T the marketing and disposal of Eagleswell school site shown edged red in Appendix A as attached to the report for a mixed use (retail and residential) development (subject to planning) be agreed in consultation with the Leader, Cabinet Member for Children Services and Schools and Managing Director.

 

(3) T H A T the appointment of property agents/consultants to assist with the marketing and disposal of the site be authorised.

 

(4) T H A T the Head of Legal Services be authorised to prepare, complete and execute the appropriate legal documentation required to dispose of the site.

 

(5) T H A T the demolition of the superstructure of the buildings be authorised subject to statutory requirements and following the staff and pupils vacating the site.

 

(6) T H A T the appointment of specialist contractors/consultants to implement geotechnical/ground condition and topographical surveys of the site be authorised.

 

(7) T H A T the Capital Programme for 2016/17 be increased by £300k to cover the estimated cost of demolition.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To declare Eagleswell school site as surplus to requirements in view of the pending relocation of the staff and pupils to Llantwit Learning Community.

 

(2) To enable the marketing and disposal of Eagleswell School site for a mixed use (retail and residential) development (subject to planning).

 

(3) To facilitate the appointment of property agents/consultants for the marketing and disposal exercise.

 

(4) To authorise the Head of Legal Services to prepare, complete and execute the appropriate legal documentation required to dispose of the site. 

 

(5) To enable the demolition of the superstructure of the buildings on the site.

 

(6) To enable the completion of site surveys.

 

(7) To ensure all costs were included in the Capital Programme. 

 

C2617  INSTRUMENT OF GOVERNMENT FOR DINAS POWYS PRIMARY SCHOOL (CSS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – LIFELONG LEARNING) -

 

Approval was sought of the name of the newly amalgamated school in Dinas Powys.

 

Cabinet has previously approved the proposal to amalgamate Dinas Powys Infant and Murch Junior Schools with effect from 5 January, 2015 (Minute No. C2561).

 

The Governing Body must submit its draft Instrument of Government to the Council for making in accordance with the legislation; Government of Maintained Schools (Wales) Regulations 2005. This is the legal process for naming a new school.

 

The governing body of Dinas Powys Infant School approved the draft Instrument of Government (attached at Appendix 1 to the report) on 24 November 2014. The governing body became the governing body of the primary school as the age range of the Infant School had been extended to accommodate the pupils of Murch Junior School.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the Instrument of Government attached at Appendix 1 to the report and consequently the name of the newly amalgamated school in Dinas Powys as Dinas Powys Primary School be approved.

 

Reason for decision

 

To ensure that the naming of this school complied with the legal framework.

 

C2618  PENARTH LEARNING COMMUNITY UPDATE REPORT (CSS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – LIFELONG LEARNING) - 

 

Cabinet was updated on the asbestos removal and demolition of existing school buildings. 

 

Phase 1 of Penarth Learning Community was completed on 6 October, 2014 after 104 weeks on site.

Following the completion of phase 1 and the vacation of the former buildings in Penarth, phase 2 involved the demolition of the former buildings and the construction of sports pitches with completion scheduled for 6 October, 2015.  The Council had been working closely with the contractor to progress phase 2 which included the demolition of buildings containing asbestos.

 

Under the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012, as the client the Council had a duty to provide full information to contractors on asbestos containing materials (ACMs). Demolition surveys of the ACMs in the remaining school buildings had been undertaken. These involved intrusive and destructive inspections, penetrating all parts of the building’s structures.

 

Prior to the handover of the vacated buildings, Leadbitter had undertaken a tender exercise to scope the value of the work package based on the information available at that time, however, following the full demolition surveys the level of ACMs known to be present had increased resulting in a significant increase in tender costs. This was in part due to identification of the presence of ACMs in the concrete floor slabs and in the bitumen on other floor areas and an increase in the amount of known ACMs in the structures. This had resulted in additional costs associated with the asbestos removal package which had not previously been identified.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

(2) T H A T additional funding of £250k from the building fund for asbestos removal be approved and that the capital programme for 2014/15 be amended to reflect this.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To note the necessary information regarding the Penarth Learning Community project.

 

(2) To permit the safe demolition of the vacated school buildings to enable the completion of the project and to increase the 2014/15 capital programme accordingly.

 

C2619  COWBRIDGE CHARTER TRUST MANAGEMENT AGREEMENT – CHANGE OF NAME AND REQUEST TO EXTEND THE AGREEMENT (LPCSD) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) - 

 

Cabinet was informed of a request made by 'Cowbridge Charter Trust' to transfer its Management Agreement to Cowbridge Charter Trust 'Charitable Incorporated Organisation' (CIO) and to extend the term of the Management Agreement by 10 years to 11 October, 2029.

 

Cabinet at its meeting of 29 July, 2009 agreed to enter into a written agreement with Cowbridge Charter Trust ("the Management Agreement") to undertake a revival of the Grounds of Cowbridge Old Hall (Cabinet Minute C559 refers).

 

A request had been received from the Cowbridge Charter Trust to transfer the current Management Agreement to a new charitable organisation, the 'Cowbridge Charter Trust cio', and to extend the current management agreement by 10 years.  A copy of this letter of request was attached at Appendix A to the report.

 

Cowbridge Charter Trust Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO) was entered onto the Register of Charities on 20 March, 2014 and the CIO status of the organisation would enable it to conduct business in its own name, limiting the liability of its members.

 

At the meeting the Leader and Cabinet Member for Leisure, Parks, Culture and Sports Development thanked the Cowbridge Charter Trust Charitable Incorporated Organisation, along with all the volunteers who have helped to improve the Old Hall Gardens.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the Management Agreement of 8 November, 2010 between the Council and Cowbridge Charter Trust be assigned to Cowbridge Charter Trust Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO).

 

(2) T H A T the extension of the Management Agreement until 11 October, 2029 on the same terms and conditions as currently exist be agreed.

 

(3) T H A T the Head of Legal Services be authorised to execute a Deed of Assignment and Variation to enable assignment of the Management Agreement and extension of its term to take place.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To enable assignment of the Management Agreement to take place.

 

(2) To enable the Management Agreement to be extended for the requisite 10 year period.

 

(3) To enable the Management Agreement changes to be formalised and the documentation completed.

 

C2620  SECTION 106 LEGAL AGREEMENTS – PROTOCOL FOR CONSULTATION ON IMPLEMENTATION OF SPEND (RIPT) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) - 

 

Endorsement was sought for an updated protocol for Member Consultation on the use of financial contributions received from Section 106 obligations.

 

The Council had the power to enter into legal agreements with developers under Section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990, seeking contributions from developers to mitigate negative development impacts and facilitated development which might otherwise not have occurred. 

 

The Council's approved Planning Obligations Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) set out the Council's policies for seeking Section 106 obligations including financial contributions. This often resulted in financial payments being made to the Council to provide facilities or infrastructure in the vicinity of new developments such as education facilities, sustainable transport or community facilities.

 

In February 2008 Cabinet and Planning Committee endorsed a protocol for Member Consultation on Section 106 spend following a review by the Ward Member Consultation Task and Finish Group of the Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources). This was reviewed by Cabinet in 2012 following concerns that financial contributions were not being spent quickly enough once received from developers.

 

The 2012 amended protocol set out that when financial contributions were received, the relevant ward and Cabinet members and officers from the relevant service areas were notified at the same time and options for spend were considered and proposed by the relevant service area before further consultation was undertaken with Ward and Cabinet Members and a scheme for implementation was agreed.

 

Following this consultation the Director of Development Services made the final decision. In the event that the local Member was aggrieved with this decision, the decision was called in to Planning Committee to determine. Since the introduction of this protocol, this had only occurred on one occasion, in respect of an 'Education Facilities' contribution from the development of the Former Lower School site, Cowbridge.

 

Following the above case, the process had been reviewed and an amended protocol was drafted, to reflect the fact that decisions on capital projects funded by Section 106 contributions were a matter for the Executive and not Planning Committee.

 

The amended protocol was attached at Appendix A to the report.

 

At its meeting on 14 November, 2014 the Community Liaison Committee considered the Annual Section 106 Review 2013-14 Report. They recommended: (1) T H A T Cabinet be requested to consider the feasibility of including consultation with Town and Community Councils in the Section 106 process and report back to the Committee and (2) That the report, referred to in 1 above, also includes details of the differences between Section 106 and the proposed Community Infrastructure Levy.

At their meeting on 15 December, 2014 Cabinet considered this request and resolved as follows:

 

(1) T H A T the comments made about consultation with Town and Community Council's be noted, however, it should be for the respective Vale Councillor for the area to liaise with their Community Council in line with the protocol attached as an Appendix A to the report.

 

(2) T H A T a further report be presented to Cabinet in due course to consider all aspects of the Section 106 negotiations.

 

(3) T H A T a further report be presented to the Community Liaison Committee once it had been considered by the Cabinet.

 

In this regard, Town and Community Councils could comment on proposals and potential Section 106 agreements at the application stage, particularly as Officers and Members considered the need for mitigation at that stage.

 

In addition, as Local Ward Members were consulted on proposals for projects once money was received, this provided another mechanism for Town and Community Councils to comment on proposals. This approach was deemed to be an appropriate level of engagement given the need to balance engagement against the timely implementation of Capital schemes to mitigate new development. A letter outlining this process was sent to all Town and Community Council's in 2011, and was attached at Appendix B to the report.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the updated protocol for Member Consultation on the use of financial contributions received from Section 106 obligations as attached at Appendix A to the report, be approved.

 

(2) T H A T the report be referred to Planning Committee and Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) for consideration.

 

(3) T H A T a further report outlining the differences between the current Section 106 system and the impending Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) system, including an update on the Council's progress towards adopting CIL, be reported to Cabinet and referred to Community Liaison Committee in due course for information.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To ensure the effective future implementation of Section 106 obligations, whilst engaging relevant Members in the process.

 

(2) To seek the views of Planning Committee and Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) on the updated protocol.

 

(3) To inform Community Liaison Committee about the Section 106 and CIL systems and progress to date.

 

C2621  LOCAL HOUSING STRATEGY 2015 - 2020 (HBMCS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION) -  

 

Approval was sought for the adoption of the Local Housing Strategy 2015-2020.

 

The Council had a statutory role to play in the functioning of the housing market, which included the requirement for local authorities to produce local housing strategies as was set out in Section 87 - Local Government Act 2003.

 

The intention was for local authorities to play a lead role in developing an approach to housing across all tenures and ensured the delivery of more integrated housing and related services to meet local need. The strategic housing function incorporated an enabling role; the local authority worked in partnership with other public, private and third sector organisations, delivering suitable housing and developed innovative solutions addressing local housing needs.

 

In February 2014 the Council hosted a Local Housing Strategy Evidence Gathering Day which included presentations, workshops and consultation exercises focusing on a number of housing topics. The views of partner organisations, representatives from the public, private and third sectors, elected members and Council departments was used to inform the development of the Local Housing Strategy. A summary of the Evidence Gathering Day was attached at Appendix 1 to the report.

 

The Local Housing Strategy set out the approach that was taken to meet the legislative requirements of the Housing (Wales) Act 2014 (Cabinet Minute C2350). The legislation governing different aspects of the Act were rolled out over a number of years. The Local Housing Strategy provided a locally agreed, long term vision for housing; it provided a statement of local strategic housing-related objectives and target outcomes. The strategy covered a period of five years; however the vision was viewed over a longer period of time within the context of the Community Strategy.

 

The proposed Local Housing Strategy 2015-20, as attached at Appendix 2 to the report, set out the vision for housing in the Vale of Glamorgan, in the following statement:

 

"All residents in the Vale of Glamorgan have access to good quality, suitable, housing and are able to live happily and independently in vibrant, sustainable communities".

 

In order to achieve the vision for housing in the Vale, four key aims were identified below, each of which was supported by a number of objectives which formed the basis of the actions identified in the Action Plan:

 

• Aim 1: Provided more homes and more choice; ensuring that all residents had access to suitable and affordable accommodation.

 

• Aim 2: Improved homes and communities; ensured housing was maintained and fit for purpose, increased the supply of good quality, energy efficient homes in vibrant and sustainable communities.

 

• Aim 3: Provided better housing advice and support; ensured that residents had access to the housing and services they needed to live independently and plan their housing futures.

 

• Aim 4: Promoted equality of access to housing and housing services.

 

In July 2014 Cabinet agreed that the draft Local Housing Strategy could be made available for public consultation (Cabinet Minute C2398). The consultation process began on 1 September, 2014 for 4 weeks.

 

70 consultation responses were received, a summary of which was attached at Appendix 3 to the report. As a result of the consultation, changes had been made to the Strategy. The most notable changes made were summarised below:

 

• Information related to Technical Advice Notes and Supplementary Planning Guidance included in relation to Planning Policy Wales and local planning policy.

• The inclusion of relevant Health policy and frameworks.

• Planned and agreed legislative changes had been updated to reflect their most up-to-date position in the National Assembly's legislative process. 

• Key partnerships diagram amended to show the new Local Service Board structure.

• Information updated following the change in Welsh Government Minister with responsibility for housing.

• Objective: Increase Housing Supply included clarity around opportunities for co-operative and self-build housing.

• Objective: Develop Appropriate Housing to Meet Specific Needs with the Community had the most recent and agreed priorities for the Supporting People Programme.

• Under Aim 2: Improve Homes and Communities, 'Enable Access to Repairs, Improvements and Housing Adaptations' had been separated into a stand-alone objective rather than being within the objective to Improve the Quality of Private Sector Housing. Within this objective the information relating to repairs, improvements and adaptations had been updated and strengthened.

 

The draft Local Housing Strategy was to apply to 2014-19, however due to time taken to develop, consult on and adopt the Strategy, it was changed to cover 2015-2020.

 

At the meeting the Leader commented that paragraph 36 of the report would need to be amended in light of the revised recommendation 2. Currently it read that “This was a matter for Executive decision” whereas, it was verbally amended to read “This is a matter for Full Council”, as the report dealt with a council strategy that required Full Council approval.

 

This was a matter for Executive and Council decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the changes made to the draft Local Housing Strategy (entitled 2014-2019) as a result of the public consultation be noted.

 

(2) T H A T the Local Housing Strategy 2015-2020, as attached at Appendix 2 to the report, be agreed and forwarded to Full Council for approval.

 

(3) T H A T the report be referred to Scrutiny Committee (Housing and Public Protection) for information.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To note the changes made to the draft Local Housing Strategy 2015 - 2020.

 

(2) To enable the Council to meet the requirement for each Local Authority to adopt a Local Housing Strategy as set out in Section 87 of the Local Government Act 2003.

 

(3) For information.

 

C2622  LLANDOUGH VILLAGE – EXPERIMENTAL TRAFFIC REGULATION ORDER – 20MPH SPEED LIMIT (EVS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) -  

 

Approval was sought to give notice of a proposal to introduce an experimental 20 mph speed limit through Llandough.

 

A public consultation exercise was undertaken in April – May 2013 in order to help understand the public’s view with regard to the possible implementation of 20mph schemes in Penarth and Llandough.

 

The results of the consultation suggested that (although marginal) the majority of residents who responded within the Llandough Ward were in support and would welcome some further investigation into a 20 mph scheme, primarily due to ongoing concerns with vehicle speeds and road safety through the village

 

The details of the public consultation were presented to Cabinet in July 2013 where it was agreed the Director of Development Services would determine the viability of the introduction of 20mph zones within Llandough as part of the ongoing work to develop a 'package' of sustainable transport options for the area following the development of Llandough Hospital (Minute No. C1438 refers).

 

Following meetings held with the local community it was apparent that although there was support for a reduction in the speed limit to 20 mph, residents did not necessarily support or agree with the need for vertical calming features (in particular speed cushions). It was a requirement that 20mph zones were self-enforcing and therefore, without vertical calming features, a zone may not be appropriate.

 

Subsequently the Council proposed an experimental 20 mph speed limit. A limit did not require physical calming measures and therefore the scheme would have consisted of signage only. Thus, it would have relied on police enforcement, and more significantly the awareness and acknowledgment of drivers, to ensure a good level of compliance. A schedule and plan which showed the extent of the proposed experimental order was attached at Appendix A to the report.

 

Vehicle speeds and traffic volumes were to be assessed prior to implementation and continually monitored during the proposed experimental phase of the 20 mph speed limit. As part of the statutory process, during the first six months of implementation, public opinion and feedback was to be encouraged. Following six months all feedback and any objections would have been reviewed and considered, along with the before and after traffic survey data. At this stage Cabinet would be requested to either continue with the changes on a permanent basis or revert back to the previous (existing) situation.

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for Regeneration, Innovation, Planning and Transportation commented that she was pleased that there were positive discussions with the residents of Llandough regarding the experimental traffic regulation order – 20mph speed limit scheme.

 

She further commented that work linked to this scheme could also help to create a change in physical infrastructure to make Llandough feel more like a village, that could help to discourage speeding.

 

The Leader commented that the Local Ward Councillor was fully supportive and in favour of the proposals. He further commented that the boundary of the scheme was due to start at the Church however, it might be extended as a result of the pilot scheme.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

(2) T H A T public notice of the Council’s intention to make an Experimental Traffic Regulation Order as detailed in Appendix A as attached to the report and indicated on plan number T/14/109/DJH be approved.

 

(3) T H A T, in the event of no objections being received from the Chief Constable and other statutory consultees, the Experimental Order be confirmed.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To note the contents of the report.

 

(2) To comply with the requirements of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984.

 

(3) To allow the experimental order to be made and for the necessary works to be undertaken.

 

C2623  TRANSPORT SAVINGS PROGRAMME UPDATE (EVS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) -  

 

Cabinet was apprised of the commencement of the Transport Savings Programme, following consideration of the update report by Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) and approval was sought for the tendering of an external support partner to assist in delivering the fleet and vehicle maintenance and procurement elements of the Programme.

 

A requirement to review significant areas of current spend, including arrangements related to vehicle transport was highlighted in the Council’s 2012/2013 medium term financial plan. A diagnostic review project was sponsored by the Director of Visible Services and Housing and project managed by the Senior Business Improvement Partner. As a result of a competitive tendering process to obtain the services of an experienced transport change partner, Edge Public Solutions was selected to perform the diagnostic review, supported by a member of the Council’s Business Improvement team.

 

The diagnostic review document provided a detailed assessment of the current transport arrangements and scope for improvement across the service areas detailed within the scope, which culminated in a series of recommendations for improvement. Prior to the transport review being undertaken £690,000 of savings had already been highlighted by service managers, spread across financial years 2014/2015 and 2015/2016. Further recommendations provided by Edge identified an estimated £900,000 of additional savings, considered by the review to be achieved by 2016/2017.  The review document also provided both an assessment of the existing transport related savings plans identified by the Authority and a high level roadmap for savings and process improvements.

 

A Transport Savings Programme Update was reported to Cabinet on 8 September, 2014. Cabinet approved the contents of the report and agreed the recommendation that the diagnostic report formed the basis of a Council-wide Transport Savings programme, pending the comments of Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources).

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources), upon receiving a presentation of the diagnostic review on October 15, 2014 endorsed the recommendations of Cabinet relating to the Transport Savings Programme Update. In addition, the Transport Savings Update Report was provided to Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) for information purposes.

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) also recommended that Cabinet be requested to consider quarterly programme monitoring reports from the Transport Savings Steering Group that would enable the introduction, progression and contribution of initiatives to savings targets.

 

Individual programme work streams had been set up to create and review project briefs, project plans and indicative resource profiles in order for the recommendations called for by the review to be appropriately resourced and actioned.

 

The programme team (consisting of a Business Improvement Partner, Visible Services Accountant and the Fleet Manager), guided by the project sponsor (the Director of Visible Services) would be responsible for monitoring and reporting the actions and savings achieved by the individual projects against a baseline assessment.

 

A detailed implementation plan would be issued to Cabinet at one of the future Cabinet meetings, upon completion of the individual project plans by Project Managers.

 

The steering group was of the view that gaps in specialist expertise relating to garage and fleet improvement could have potentially hampered attempts to improve the current service to its full potential. Similarly, it had also been identified that the authority could benefit from specialist transport procurement expertise related to the purchase, maintenance and disposal of vehicles over their useful life and secondly, the development of cost effective transport contract arrangements via electronic tendering frameworks. It was therefore recommended that expert advice was procured on a short term basis in order to ensure the recommendations relating to garage/fleet improvement and transport procurement/contractual arrangements were fully implemented.

 

It was proposed that the services of an external support partner be procured for a 12 month period, providing management/procurement consultancy support one day per week. The current savings targets for the Authority from 2015/16 to 2017/18 included transport related savings that totalled £1.325m.

 

The revised project plan which included details of all themes, recommendations and project managers was attached at Appendix A to the report.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the Transport Savings Review Report and the formation of the Transport Savings Programme, be approved.

 

(2) T H A T Cabinet be provided with quarterly update reports from the Transport Savings Steering Group that outlined initiatives introduced, progress of initiatives and savings achieved against savings anticipated.

 

(3) T H A T the request to procure an external support partner to assist in delivering the fleet and vehicle maintenance and procurement elements of the Transport Savings Programme, be approved.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To provide the Council with a robust mechanism for reporting the work undertaken on the Transport Savings Programme.

 

(2) To introduce appropriate monitoring arrangements to ensure that transport savings proposals are actioned, monitored and achieved and to also address a recommendation of the Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources).

 

(3) To provide the necessary authority to procure a suitably specialised external partner to assist the savings programme.