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Agenda Item No.

CABINET

Minutes of a meeting held on 09 February, 2015.

 

Present: Councillor N. Moore (Chairman), Councillor S.C. Egan (Vice – Chairman); Councillors: B.E. Brooks, L. Burnett, R. Curtis, C.P.J. Elmore and G. John.

 

Also Present:

 

C2624  MINUTES –

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the meeting held on 26 January, 2015 be approved as a correct record.

 

C2625  DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST –

 

No declarations were received.

 

At the meeting the Leader welcomed the Director of Employment for the Welsh Local Government Association who was present to provide Cabinet with any further information if required in regard to Agenda Item no.10 titled Employee Pay Policy 2015/16.

 

C2626  EMPLOYEE PAY POLICY 2015/16 (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) –

 

With the exception of the following, all officers vacated the room during consideration of this item: Cabinet Officer and Cabinet Support Officer.

 

Cabinet was asked to consider and endorse the Council's Pay Policy for 2015/16 as required by the Localism Act 2011 prior to its submission to Council for consideration and approval. 

 

The Council had a statutory requirement under the Localism Act 2011 to prepare a

pay policy statement for each financial year. The first statement was approved by Council in March 2012.

 

The proposals set out in the report raised a number of potential conflicts of interest for members of the Council's Corporate Management Team. In view of this, advice had been sought and received from the Welsh Local Government Association (WLGA) on the updating of the Policy and particularly in relation to issues set out in paragraphs 9 to 16.

 

In view of this, the Director of Employment from the WLGA was also in attendance at the meeting to answer any questions or points of clarification that were required.

 

The Policy had been produced on the basis of statutory guidance, advice from the Welsh Local Government Association and guidance from Welsh Government and provided a framework for ensuring that employees were rewarded fairly and objectively, in accordance with the service needs of the Council and that there was openness and transparency in relation to the process.

 

The Pay Policy for 2015/16 attached at Appendix A to the report had been updated to incorporate the following:-

  • Updated guidance from Welsh Government as issued in February 2014
  • Changes as prescribed by the Local Authorities Standing Orders (Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2014 which took effect from 1 July, 2014
  • The details of a national pay award for employees covered by the National Joint Council for Local Government Services
  • The outcome of a local collective agreement in relation to the removal of telephone allowances and the phasing out of remaining essential car user allowance payments

In addition, paragraphs 6.19 to 6.25 of the Pay Policy set out the detail of remuneration arrangements for staff undertaking duties in respect of elections and referenda/ballots.

 

The Policy also reflected updated guidance from Welsh Government as issued in February 2014 and changes prescribed by the Local Authorities Standing Orders (Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2014 which took effect from 1 July, 2014.

 

A particular change as set out in the Local Authorities (Standing Orders) (Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2014 was the introduction of the requirement that: “The relevant authority must determine the level, and any change in the level, of the remuneration to be paid to a chief officer”

 

The impact of the amendment was that all changes to chief officer pay must be voted on by full Council, not just those that were determined locally. This included any pay rises that had been nationally negotiated by the Joint Negotiating Committee (JNC) and these now could not be paid, unless and until, they had been agreed by full Council.

 

The Council’s Pay Policy had to be approved and re-published by the 31 March, 2015 in order to comply with the provisions of the Localism Act.

 

The Policy would be updated as appropriate to take into account any changes to the Council's senior management structure resulting from the Managing Director's recent decision to retire from her post in November 2014.

 

At the meeting the Director of Employment for the Welsh Local Government Association commented that the need for the Council to approve and publish an Employee Pay Policy had not changed but that the current version for 2015 / 16 did adequately reflect a number of additional statutory requirements and also advice from Welsh Government.

 

This was a matter for Full Council

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the required changes to the Council's Pay Policy for 2015/16 as set out in the report and as incorporated in the revised statement as attached at Appendix A to the report be noted.

 

(2) T H A T the particular references to any potential changes to the pay for Chief Officers as a result of annual pay awards as set out in paragraphs 9 to 14 of the report be noted and endorsed.

 

(3) T H A T the Pay Policy be referred to Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) on the 10 February, 2015 then to Council on the 4 March, 2015 for consideration and approval.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To respond to the legal requirement under the Standing Orders (Wales) Amendment Regulations 2014 and related advice from Welsh Government.

 

(2) To enable the processing of pay awards as negotiated by the JNC for Chief Officers.

 

(3) To respond to the legal requirement under the Localism Act and to provide openness and accountability in how the Council rewards its staff.

 

C2627  PRESENTATION – CSSIW NATIONAL INSPECTION OF SAFEGUARDING AND CARE PLANNING OF LOOKED AFTER CHILDREN AND CARE LEAVERS WHO EXHIBIT VULNERABLE OR RISKY BEHAVIOUR (REF) –

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health) on 5 January, 2015 considered the above report of the Director of Social Services.

 

Ms. Pam Clutton, the Lead Inspector for the CSSIW, commenced the presentation by providing a brief background summary.  She advised that Members would be aware of national issues regarding sexual exploitation of children and young people that had recently been reported within the press.

 

This would be the first time since 2009 that all Local Authorities within Wales had been inspected.  The main focus was on Looked After Children aged 11+ who exhibited risky behaviour and, as part of the review, ten case files from each Local Authority had been inspected. 

 

Members were advised that the inspection methods had been changed with a new approach adopted that included meetings with all relevant partners in order to establish what worked and what could have been done better.  By adopting this approach, it was felt that this would help to better get the message across that corporate safeguarding was the responsibility of everyone. 

 

In evaluating the corporate leadership, the inspection had highlighted that this was an area of strength within the Vale of Glamorgan.  Safeguarding of vulnerable children and young people had been identified as a corporate priority.  Within the Vale of Glamorgan it had been acknowledged that the service had been able to show what differences child protection arrangements had made and were able to evidence real benefits to service users. 

 

There was also clear leadership and a positive culture within the management team.  The workforce had been stable with managers and staff evidencing a strong commitment to improving outcomes for Looked After Children and young people. 

 

Areas of development in relation to corporate parenting included the need to give greater consideration as to whether a more co-ordinated approach to implementing improvements for Looked After Children could be achieved from the development of a corporate parenting strategy.  There was also an identified gap around planning that could be filled by establishing a collective profile of vulnerable children and the risks they experience. 

 

In considering care and pathway planning within the Vale of Glamorgan, the inspection highlighted that there was a clear shared understanding and commitment from staff to safeguard young people in order to improve their outcomes.  There were also some good examples of risk assessments which were comprehensive and resulted in clear safety plans.  However, it was not always evident whether young people had been fully engaged in the process.

 

The Council had effectively identified and responded to the need to increase the range of placements available, especially for those young people with challenging behaviour and additional needs. 

 

The inspection had noted concerns around the capacity of services for children and adolescents with emotional and mental health issues and this was a common theme identified throughout the whole of Wales. 

 

Many care leavers had expressed a positive response in answering queries regarding support they had received from their personal advisors, which was timely and effective. However, some care leavers had expressed concerns about changes to their allocated social worker and who to go to when seeking support and guidance.

 

A further area of improvement had been identified which was the need to tackle some inconsistencies in the completion of core assessments which, in some cases, lacked analysis and were not routinely updated. 

 

The Police had expressed concerns around their level of engagement in the implementation of the protocol for missing young people and considered that this should be revisited to ensure that the arrangements were clearly understood and working effectively.  This may have been the consequence of changes in staffing within the local Police unit responsible.

 

The Committee was advised that, with regard to arrangements around safety and better outcomes for young people, the work of the Independent Reviewing Officer was an area of development.  Within the Vale of Glamorgan, most Independent Reviewing Officers had very good knowledge of the Looked After Children that they worked with.  However, in some cases, Independent Reviewing Officers appeared reluctant to refer concerns and issues up to higher authorities such as the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Services (CAFCASS). 

 

Consideration should also be given to whether there could be a more consistent approach to support Looked After Children to engage in planning how to develop services. 

 

A Committee Member, referring to the need for better engagement with Looked After Children, queried whether there were any suggestions that the CSSIW could provide in order to improve this.  In response, the Lead Inspector advised that there was a need for more regular opportunities to sit down with the young people to discuss the range of issues affecting them and provide information around how they could access support when needed. 

 

In response to a question regarding the impact of budgetary pressures placed upon the Police service, the Lead Inspector voiced the opinion that this had had a negative impact.  Most young people were only truly comfortable talking to or engaging with individuals and professionals that they fully knew and trusted.  Changes to individual Police Officers had meant that many young people did not have full confidence to openly engage with the Police.

 

A Committee Member queried whether the CSSIW had had the opportunity to review the service’s action plan and asked whether there were any areas within the action plan that the service should prioritise over the next few months.  The Lead Inspector advised that this was a difficult question to answer as the inspection was very focussed on a small cohort of children and it was difficult for the CSSIW to monitor and comment on each individual action plan.  She went on to advise that, even with the most rigorous arrangements, things could still go wrong.  The key was around ensuring that social workers, who would usually be working on their own, were fully supported and supervised within their role. 

 

Further to this, the Committee was advised that the CSSIW will be monitoring and tracking the performance of individual local authorities through its routine arrangements and the CSSIW will react and respond should any concerns be identified.

 

The Chairman queried whether it was fair to say that not all young people wanted to engage.  In response the Lead Inspector stated that, yes, she would accept this.  However, it was useful to continually talk about child protection arrangements with young people in order to get the message across to them that there was someone that cared for them and provided support during stressful and emotional times.  There was a need for Councils to have confidence to engage with young people at that level and to continually ensure that young people were fully aware of the support network that was available to them. 

 

The Chairman, in highlighting the Committee’s concerns around mental health services offered to children and adolescents, queried as to when a strategy to tackle these issues would be devised.  In response, the Lead Inspector advised that from the perspective of the CSSIW, they had observed that most Local Authorities worked within their own arrangements and guidelines and that levels of support offered were generally very good.  There however was an issue around clinical diagnosis of mental health issues and there was a clear need for improvements to be made around the provision and the range of services available.  This clearly came back to the level of investment and funding made available to the Children and Adolescent Mental Health Service. 

 

At this point, the Director of Social Services stated that the Welsh Government was looking at ways forward to develop the mental health services for children and adolescents.  A national report covering the inspection of all the 22 Authorities in Wales was to be published imminently and the Vale of Glamorgan had proactively developed an action plan to tackle some of these issues at a local level.  There was a need to wait for the national picture in order to strengthen some of the recommendations contained within the Local Authority’s action plan produced in response to its own inspection.  It was right to say that there was a new level of urgency following cases of sexual exploitation and that the Police were keen to look at issues around missing people.  He further advised that there was a need to build upon the momentum generated by the work of CSSIW and that the service in the Vale needed to be vigilant in all cases.  He commended the work of staff involved with working with Looked After Children and this had given the service a position of strength on which to build. 

 

The Committee was keen to receive an update to the action plan, particularly in relation to the level of engagement with Looked After Children. 

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1) T H A T the key messages to emerge from the inspection, including areas of progress and areas for improvement, and the action plan produced in response to the recommendations be noted.

 

(2) T H A T the report and presentation of the National Inspection of Safeguarding and Care Planning for Looked After Children and Care Leavers who exhibit vulnerable and risky behaviours, be referred to Cabinet.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1) To ensure that Members are kept informed about outcomes from independent inspection of Social Services’ performance in the Vale of Glamorgan.

 

(2) To update Cabinet of the key messages to emerge from the inspection.”

 

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Cabinet, having considered the recommendations of the Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health)

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the contents of the report.

 

C2628  REVENUE AND CAPITAL MONITORING FOR THE PERIOD 1ST APRIL 2014 TO 30TH NOVEMBER 2014 (REF) –

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health) on 5 January, 2015 considered the above report of the Director of Social Services.

 

The Operational Manager, Accountancy, presented the report, the purpose of which was to update Members of the position in respect of revenue and capital expenditure for the period 1st April to 30th November 2014.  Members were advised that the current year end forecast for the Social Services budget was an overspend of £400,000.  A table and graph setting out the variance between profiled budget and actual expenditure to date and the projected position at year end were attached at Appendix 1 to the report. 

 

Children and Young People Services – this service was currently anticipated to outturn £400,000 under budget at year end.  The major issue concerning this service continued to be the pressure on the children’s placements budget.  However, it was currently projected that the Joint Budget for Residential Placements for Looked After Children could outturn with a £100,000 underspend at year end.  Work had been ongoing to ensure that children were placed in the most appropriate and cost effective placements, however, it should be noted that due to the high cost of such placements, the outturn  position could fluctuate.  There were potential underspends elsewhere in Children's Services relating to team budgets of £52,000, £54,000 relating to administrative staff, £50,000 on legal expenses, £60,000 due to additional adoption income and £84,000 on alternative means of provision and accommodation costs required for the current cohort of children.

 

Adult Services – this service was currently anticipated to outturn £800,000 over budget at year end.  This was due to a projected overspend on Community Care Packages of £1.0m as a result of increased demand for services, particularly for frail older clients.  The service would strive to manage demand, not only to avoid a further increase in the overspend, but also to reduce the overspend.  Whilst every effort would be made to improve this position, it could not be guaranteed that this position would not deteriorate further by year end as this budget was extremely volatile and the impact of winter pressures would need to be assessed.  The annual deferred income budget for 2014/15 had been set at £725,000 and at 30th November 2014 income received to date was £24,000 under-recovered.  The year-end projection had been maintained at a £100,000 under-recovery.  This position was included as part of the projected overspend on the Community Care packages budget.  There were potential underspends elsewhere in Adult Services of around £200,000 which could be used to offset this position.  These areas were £114,000 on staffing, £19,000 on transport, £38,000 on premises and £29,000 on supplies and services.

 

Appendix 2 to the report detailed financial progress on the Capital Programme as at 30th November 2014.

 

Bryneithin Marketing and Disposal – it had been requested that the 2014/15 Capital Programme be increased by £22,000 to fund costs associated with marketing and disposal of the former Bryneithin Site.  This scheme would be funded via a contribution from Capital Receipts.

 

Woodlands Demolition – it had been requested that £2.5,000 be carried forward into the 2015/16 Capital Programme for the release of retention in line with the contract.

 

Castle Avenue External Structures Works – this budget would not be required for the Castle Avenue Scheme and it had therefore been requested that the budget of £1,000 be transferred to the Hen Goleg Boiler Replacement Scheme.

 

Flying Start Grants – a grant award of £25,000 had been approved by Welsh Government for outside works at Alexander Community Centre.    Despite best efforts it had not been possible to address all of the difficulties presented by the outdoor space and therefore only indoor space would be provided at the Centre.  As a result, Welsh Government had been asked to vire this sum to the Colcot Scheme, which would allow further work to be undertaken such as the provision of a canopy, basic equipment and an internal folding door.  This would now bring the budget for the Colcot element of the scheme to £315,000.

 

For all schemes where it was evident that the full year's budget would not be spent during the year, the relevant officers were required to provide an explanation for the shortfall and this would be taken to the earliest available Cabinet.

 

Appendix 3 to the report provided non-financial information on capital construction schemes.

 

On 5th March 2014, Council approved the savings targets for 2014/15 and the initial savings targets for 2015/16 and 2016/17. 

 

As part of the Medium Term Financial Plan, approved by Cabinet on 11th August 2014, it was agreed that the service remodelling savings, included in 2015/16 and 2016/17 would be re-phased and were now set as £320,000 in 2017/18, £320,000 in 2018/19 and £330,000 in 2019/20.

 

The Directorate was currently required to find savings totalling £3.97m by the end of 2019/20.  The surplus shown was as a result of the foster carer recruitment project and could be used to mitigate any additional savings to be found in future years.

 

The following table shows the approved savings targets and the savings identified by year.  It includes the £293,000 identified in 2012/13 in excess of the saving target for that year.

 

Year

Savings

Required

£000

Savings

Identified

£000

In Year

Surplus/

(Shortfall)

£000

Cumulative

Surplus/

(Shortfall)

£000

Previously Identified

Savings

293 293 293
2014/15 713 454 (259) 34
2015/16 1,125 1,201 76 110
2016/17 1,162 1,238 76 186
2017/18 320 320 0 186
2018/19 320 320 0 186
2019/20 330 330 0 186
TOTAL 3,970 4,156


Appendix 4 to the report detailed the latest progress for each savings project currently identified. 

 

The Chairman asked if officers could expand upon potential areas of underspend within Adult Services, the Committee was advised that an underspend of around £200,000 had been identified within Adult Services, the main element of this was in respect of staffing, for which the service was ahead of schedule compared to service budget plans. 

 

A Committee Member queried whether the service had seen significant winter pressures.  In response, the Head of Adult Service advised that it was too early to identify these from the budgetary position, but he confirmed that the Local Health Board had experienced significant pressures. 

 

In response to a query regarding a review of residential services, the Committee was advised that the RED RAG status had been applied due to the complexities of the review and the contractual arrangements with providers.  Outcomes of the review were still awaited and thus the level of savings anticipated could not be guaranteed. 

 

A Committee Member queried whether in-house or external consultants would be used to progress the Reshaping Services Strategy.  In reply Members were advised that the total savings identified within the Reshaping Services Strategy amounted to £970,000 over a three year period.  There was a broad umbrella of considerations such as closer integration and working with health, also more detailed service information would be available as the Reshaping Services Strategy developed. 

 

The Chairman queried as to what level of reduction would be apportioned to the Regional Collaborative Fund (RCF).  In response, the Operational Manager, Accountancy, advised that early indications had shown that funding for the RCF would reduce by 50% but no official confirmation had been received.  Further to this the Chairman queried whether there were any contingency plans in place.  In answer to this the Director of Social Services reiterated the point that no definitive answer had been received from the Welsh Government in respect of funding.  He further advised that the Council’s Leader had written to Welsh Government on behalf of all the key partners to highlight the issues from the reduction in funding.  He alluded to the possibility of additional funding being diverted from health to help fund some aspects supported by the RCF grant.  As a final point, the Director of Social Services advised that there would need to be a greater emphasis placed upon preventative services. 

 

A Committee Member, referring to the relatively low level of savings apportioned to this financial year compared to previous years, queried whether the service had achieved the right level of balance.  The Director of Social Services advised that it was fair to say that budget saving actions had been nominally apportioned to financial years but the service had been able to bring some savings from next year into the current financial year.  This would be an important part in the service being able to achieve a balanced budget but he acknowledged that there was a need to ensure that the right pace for savings was achieved in order to manage expectations. 

 

In response to a query regarding a reduction to the short breaks service, the Head of Children and Young People Services advised that the short break and respite service had received a lot of attention.  The service was closely looking at how service provision could continue, particularly for disabled children, and part of the savings plans have included changes to the start and finish times for overnight respite without impacting on the number of nights respite a service user receives.  Overall, however, it was too early to be definitive on what exactly the service would look like following the review. 

 

In clarification of plans in relation to local residential placements for Looked After Children, the Committee was advised that a three bed facility had recently opened in Barry and that there were plans for another residential facility to be opened in a more rural part of the Vale. 

 

Having considered the report, the Committee

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1) T H A T the position with regard to the 2014/15 revenue and capital monitoring be noted.

 

(2) T H A T the progress made in delivering the Social Services Budget Programme be noted and referred to Cabinet for information.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1) That Members are aware of the position with regard to the 2014/15 revenue and capital monitoring relevant to this Committee.

 

(2) That Members are aware of the progress made to date on the Social Services Budget Programme.”

 

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At the meeting the Managing Director confirmed that the issues raised within the report would be picked up in a further budget report due to be presented to Cabinet on the 23 February, 2015.

 

Cabinet, having considered the recommendations of the Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health)

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted and the issues raised be included in a further budget report that was due to come to Cabinet on the 23 February, 2015.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the contents of the report.

 

C2629  GENERAL PLANNING MATTERS (REF) –

 

The Planning Committee on 15 January, 2015 considered the above report of the Director of Development Services.

 

(i) Welsh Government Consultation

 

The Committee received a report updating Members on the Welsh Government (WG) consultation and to recommend an appropriate response to those consultations.

 

The Committee was informed that as part of the implementation of the proposed changes to the Planning System in Wales, which will be introduced through the Planning (Wales) Bill, a number of consultation papers had been released seeking the views of interested parties with regard to the above.  Issues such as introducing a national design policy, making pre-application submission mandatory, reviewing the size and makeup of planning committees and the powers of delegation available to Councils and reviewing the fees for the submission of planning applications to a Council were all considered in these consultations.

 

The consultation papers attached at Appendix A to the report included a set of specific questions to which the WG was requesting views.  The closing date for replies was 16th January 2015.

 

The proposed responses to the consultation papers point out concerns with issues such as:

  • Requiring the refund of planning fees if a decision was not made within a specified timescale
  • Requiring a mandatory pre-application submission process for major applications (possibly without any new fee)
  • New limits on the size and make up of planning committees
  • A proposed national scheme of delegation.

The issues were addressed individually in the consultation responses attached at Appendix B to the report.

 

Following the presentation of the report, a discussion ensued in which the following questions and issues were put forward by Members:

 

Questions Responses
A Member asked what the Local Planning Authority’s response was in regard to the question on Planning Committee membership in multi-Member wards. The Operational Manager for Development Control advised that it would be almost impossible to get a full Planning Committee together if these rules were to be enforced. He further informed the Committee that this point had been made in the consultation response to Welsh Government.
A Member asked if a Planning Committee did not endorse an Officer’s recommendations for a planning application, and it went to appeal, whether the individual Members would be required to attend the appeal and what support would the Members receive from the Local Planning Authority? The Operational Manager for Development Control informed the Committee that Welsh Government was attempting to impose a Wales-wide constitution and lead Welsh Councils had come out against this. He advised that there would be no specific implications for individual Members and any Member required to attend an appeal would receive the full support of the Local Planning Authority. He further advised that the only issue would be that if Welsh Government requested that a Member appeared at an appeal and the Member declined, costs could be awarded, as this would be regarded as bad practice.
A Member raised the possibility of suggesting to Welsh Government a sliding scale for the refund of planning fees. The Operational Manager for Development Control advised that the response to the consultation had made the point that the refund of Planning fees was seen to be micro-management of the planning process. He advised that a sliding scale could be suggested to Welsh Government within the consultation document, however, the planning process required work by Officers, and the possible effect of refunding fees could be free planning applications. He advised that the introduction of refunds for application fees showed a lack of understanding in relation to the financial situation in Wales and that this point had been made in the consultation response to Welsh Government.


Following consideration of the report and the consultation responses, the Committee

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the content of the report be noted and the response to the consultation agreed.

 

(2) That the matter be referred to Cabinet for information.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To allow the Council to respond to the consultation.

 

(2) To inform Cabinet of the views of Planning Committee when responding to the consultation.”

 

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Cabinet, having considered the recommendations of the Planning Committee.

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the contents of the report.

 

C2630  PROPOSED MERGER OF CORONER AREAS (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION) –

 

Members were asked to consider the Rhondda Cynon Taf Council proposal to merge the existing Cardiff and Vale Coroner Area (C&V) with the Powys, Bridgend and Glamorgan Valleys Coroner Area (PB & GV).

 

Upon Local Government re-organisation in 1996, the Bridgend and The Glamorgan Valleys jurisdiction was created (excluding the Rhymney Valleys) with Rhondda Cynon Taf (RCT) assuming the Lead role. Similarly, the Cardiff and Vale of Glamorgan (VGC) area was created with The Vale of Glamorgan as the Lead Authority.

 

In July 2014, Judge Peter Thornton QC in his first annual report to Lord Chancellor Chris Grayling quoted that the 99 coroner areas should be reduced further, to around 75 or fewer.  At present, 60% of coroner areas had fewer than 2,000 reported deaths a year and Judge Peter Thornton said most senior coroners should deal with between 3,000 and 3,500 deaths to make the service viable. The Lord Chancellor had the power to combine, or merge, coroner areas after consultation.

 

At the beginning of 2012, the Coroner for both Powys and Bridgend and The Glamorgan Valleys resigned and a Coroner was appointed as his successor.  The post was subject to a joint appointment between Powys, Bridgend and The Glamorgan Valleys (PB&GV), albeit these remained as separate areas prior to their amalgamation in July 2013.  The Coroner resigned from this post in November 2013 and a further appointment assumed the role of Acting Senior Coroner. 

 

Similarly, following the resignation of the Coroner for Cardiff and the Vale (C&V) in July 2013 the post had until recently been covered by two Part-time Assistant Coroners.  One of the Part-time Coroners had subsequently stepped down and consequently further interim arrangements had been put in place.

 

This meant that PB&GV’s acting Senior Coroner, supported by RCT, had assumed, in addition to his current role, the Acting Senior Coroner for C&V.  An Assistant Coroner for PB&GV was also assisting in this arrangement.  The Acting Senior Coroner was confident that whilst he had only been assisting C&V for a short period of time, he would be able to introduce some savings with further savings if a formal merger was to be agreed.

 

Appendix A1 and A2 attached to the report displayed the current structures of both the PB&GV area and the C&V area and Appendix C attached to the report outlined the current financial position.

 

Detailed negotiations between officers had resulted in a merger proposal from Rhondda Cynon Taf (RCT) whereby they would act as the relevant authority for a merged Coroner Area of C&V and PB&GV.  Details of the merger proposal and other Options considered were outlined in the Report.

 

The merger proposal for the RCT option relied on achieving £70k efficiency savings and would ensure;

  • Continuity of service delivery across the merged area;
  • be cost neutral to existing authorities;
  • potential future savings resulting from inter alia economies of scale, rationalisation of back office support and SLA’s with Local Health Boards.

The scope of the merger proposal related to the two coroner jurisdictions PB&GV and C&V and set out the rationale and benefits for a single area to cover the six local authorities.  Also included was the proposal to recruit a whole time Senior Coroner and part time Area Coroner ensuring a resilient service whilst maintaining current service provision.

 

The reconfiguration of the administration structure could result in redundancies, the costs of which would fall to those Councils of the existing coroner areas, should the redundancy occur prior to any merger and 12 months thereafter.

 

Appendix B attached to the report set out the structure for the proposed merger and Appendix D attached to the report set out the financial case (assuming £70k efficiency savings). 

 

The report also outlined other options that were considered for the future of the Coroner Service that included;

 

- Do Nothing with Merger and retain current Cardiff & Vale of Glamorgan structures and increase apportioned costs to Cardiff in line with latest Census figures. 

- Merge with Powys Bridgend and the Glamorgan Valleys in relation to Rhondda Cynon Taf becoming the 'Relevant Authority' for both areas. 

 

The report proposed that the option put forward by RCT to undertake a full merger between PB&GV and C&V Coroner areas was implemented at the earliest opportunity to adopt and drive forward the efficiency initiatives.  Whilst this option was dependent on achieving £70k efficiency savings it should be achievable through a restructured administration and management arrangement plus the added benefit of bargaining power within a much larger area and enable the new merged area to drive through further economies of scale.

 

If there was a decision not to proceed with the proposed merger, the current interim support will be at risk in the medium and long term. 

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T subject to agreement by Cardiff City and County Council and subsequent approval from the Chief Coroner and Lord Chancellor, the Cardiff and Vale of Glamorgan Coroner Area and the Powys, Bridgend and Glamorgan Valleys Coroner Area be merged to form one coroner's area.

 

(2) T H A T a new full-time senior coroner and one part time area coroner be appointed on a permanent basis covering the combined areas and the existing Cardiff and Vale of Glamorgan Coroner's administration support staff be transferred to the Rhondda Cynon Taf County Borough Council merged coroners service.

 

(3) T H A T any redundancy costs that result either before or 12 months after the transfer of staff to Rhondda Cynon Taf be met by the present employing relevant authority and apportioned between the Councils of that coroner's area.

 

(4) T H A T Rhondda Cynon Taf Council be designated as the 'relevant authority' for the administration and support functions for the other authorities.

 

(5) T H A T all costs be apportioned to the constituent local authorities on a population ratio basis.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1-3) To enable efficiency savings and a more resilient service for all authorities.

 

(4) To ensure the most suitable local authority was chosen as the 'relevant authority'.

 

(5) To agree the methodology for the relevant authority to recover agreed costs from the other authorities.

 

C2631  PROGRESS REPORT – IMPROVEMENT OBJECTIVES 2014/15 (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ALL) –

 

Cabinet was informed of the progress made to date in achieving Improvement Objectives as identified in the Improvement Plan Part 1 for 2014/15.

 

The monitoring of Improvement Objectives had been incorporated within the monitoring of service plans via quarterly performance reports to Corporate Management Team, Cabinet and Scrutiny Committees. 

 

These highlighted progress towards key actions in the Improvement Plan Part 1 2014/15 for which each directorate had responsibility. Examples of exceptional performance during each quarter was highlighted as were key areas of slippage and the planned remedial action to bring these back on track.

 

As at quarter 2, the priorities outlined in the Council's Improvement Plan Part 1 for 2014/15, were well on track to be achieved. Of 53 actions, 22% (12) were complete, 72% (38) were on track, 4% (2) had slipped and 2% (1) were not due to start during this quarter. In comparison, during quarter 1, 3 actions were reported as completed, 36 actions were on track and 1 had slipped. The remaining actions had not yet started.

 

Of the 43 Improvement Objective indicators, 65% (28) had met or exceeded target, 16% (7) were within 10% of the target, 7% (3) had missed the target by more than 10% and a red, amber, green (RAG) status was not applicable for the remaining 12% (5) of indicators.

 

The full progress report – Improvement Objectives 2014 / 15 was attached at Appendix 1 to the report

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the progress to date as outlined in the Improvement Objectives 2014/15 Actions and Measures reports attached at Appendices 1 and 2 to the report be noted.

 

Reason for decision

 

To ensure that the Council was on track to achieve its Improvement Objectives as outlined in Part 1 of the Improvement Plan 2014/15.

 

C2632  ANNUAL EQUALITY MONITORING REPORT (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) –

 

Cabinet was asked to approve the Annual Equality Monitoring Report that was attached at Appendix A to the report.

 

The Equality Act 2010 included a public sector equality duty (the 'general duty') as well as specific duties for Wales.  The specific duties included the requirement to publish an annual report by 31 March each year.  The annual report must set out:

  • the steps the Council had taken to identify and collect relevant information;
  • how the Council had used the information in meeting the three aims of the general duty;
  • any reasons for not collecting relevant information;
  • a statement on the effectiveness of the Council's arrangements for identifying and collecting relevant information;
  • progress towards fulfilling each of the Council's equality objectives;
  • a statement on the effectiveness of the steps that the Council had taken to fulfil each of its equality objectives;
  • specified employment information, including information on training and pay (unless it has already published this information elsewhere).

The Council could include within its annual report any other matter it felt was relevant to meeting the general duty and specific duties and was required to produce and publish a report on progress with equality issues annually by 31 March.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the Council’s Annual Equality Monitoring Report for 2013 - 14 as attached at Appendix A to the report be approved for publication.

 

Reason for decision

 

To make the Council’s Annual Equality Monitoring Report for 2013 - 14 available for scrutiny by the Equality and Human Rights Commission and others.   

 

C2633  PUBLICATION OF REVISED WELSH GOVERNMENT TECHNICAL ADVICE NOTE (TAN) 1 JOINT HOUSING LAND AVAILABILITY STUDIES (2015) (RIPT) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) –

 

Members were advised of the publication of Technical Advice Note (TAN) 1: Joint Housing Land Availability Studies by the Welsh Government attached at Appendix 1 to the report. 

 

Joint Housing Land Availability Studies (JHLAS) were the principal mechanism for monitoring the supply of housing land through the planning system. JHLAS demonstrated whether local planning authorities had a deliverable five-year supply of land for housing as required by Welsh Government policy (Planning Policy Wales, paragraph 9.2.3). Failure to have a five-year housing land supply was an important material consideration that was taken into account by Planning Inspectors when determining planning appeals for residential schemes.

 

The Welsh Government considered that up-to-date Local Development Plans were critical for ensuring that the homes needed were delivered.  The planning system, through the LDP process, must provide the land that was required, allowed for new home building.  Appropriate monitoring of housing land supply was a very important element of ensuring that this was achieved.  The Welsh Government had therefore undertaken the review of TAN1 to align the JHLAS and LDP monitoring processes, and secondly incentivise the preparation and adoption of LDPs.

 

The Council’s formal response to the consultation on the draft TAN 1 was reported to Cabinet on the 8 September, 2014 (Minute C2445 refers) and to Planning Committee on the 2 October, 2014 (Minute 464 refers).  In that response, serious concerns were raised regarding the proposals to change the manner in which housing land supply was calculated and that only authorities with an adopted LDP would be able to undertake a JHLAS calculation.  Following the consultation process the Welsh Government had now issued an interim copy of the revised TAN1 guidance.

 

A key change to the revised TAN1 guidance was that the use of JHLAS to evidence housing land supply was now limited to only those Local Planning Authorities (LPAs) that had in place either an adopted Local Development Plan or an adopted Unitary Development Plan (UDP) that was still within the plan period. 

 

The adopted Vale of Glamorgan UDP expired on 1 April, 2011, and Council officers were currently preparing for submission of the LDP to Welsh Government for independent Examination by an appointed Inspector, which was timetabled to take place from August 2015.  As a consequence of the revised TAN 1 guidance it was not until the Council had formally adopted its LDP that the Council would be able to produce its annual JHLAS report.  Under the Council’s LDP Delivery Agreement, adoption of the LDP was anticipated to take place in September/October 2016.  Local Planning Authorities that did not have either an adopted LDP or UDP would be unable to formally demonstrate its housing land supply position and would effectively be considered not to have a five year housing land supply.

 

The Council was however required to undertake an annual “objective assessment” of its housing land supply in preparation of its LDP, and would be required to “demonstrate that there was a five-year housing land supply at the time the plan was adopted and the latest approved JHLAS can be used as an important piece of evidence” outlined in the TAN 1 paragraph 3.2 attached as Appendix 1 to the report.

 

Welsh Government had advised that since the assessment would not be subject to the normal JHLAS process it would not carry the same weight for planning purposes as a formal study.  Nevertheless, officers would need to assess how planning proposals would contribute to both supporting delivery of the emerging LDP and the provision of a 5 year housing land supply on its adoption, and these were themselves considered to be important material considerations.

 

In this respect, Planning Policy Wales (PPW) (section 2.6) remarked on what happens in instances where the local development plan is not yet adopted.  Paragraph 2.6.2 of PPW advises that in development management decisions the weight to be attached to an emerging draft LDP will in general depend on the stage it has reached. In considering what weight to give to specific policies in an emerging LDP that apply to a particular proposal, local planning authorities will need to consider carefully the underlying evidence and background to the policies.  National planning policy can also be a material consideration in these circumstances (see section 4.2 of PPW).

 

On the basis of the revised TAN1 requirement for housing land supply to be calculated using only the residual method, this being the remaining years of the LDP divided by the remaining outstanding dwelling requirement, the Council’s housing land supply as of 1 April, 2014 would be 2.2 years, when compared against a 7.3 year supply using the past build rate calculation.  Although it should be noted that since April 2014, the Council had approved a number of major applications and officers anticipated that the Council’s housing land supply (based on the residual method) will increase once the 2014-2015 informal objective assessment has been completed.

 

Given that the Council was faced with a less than 5 year housing land supply, and its inability to formally participate in the JHLAS process, it was inevitable that until the Council has formally adopted its LDP, the Vale of Glamorgan will be at risk of speculative development applications as was the case during 2012/13 when the Council’s JHLAS had a less than 5 year housing land supply.  This concern was clearly raised by the Council in its formal submission to the Welsh Government draft TAN1 consultation in the Autumn 2014, as referenced via the following link:

 

http://www.valeofglamorgan.gov.uk/en/our_council/council/minutes,_agendas_and_reports/reports/cabinet/2014/14-09-08/Welsh-Government-Consultation-Draft-Technical-Advice-Note-.aspx

 

It was notable that similar concerns were also raised by the Welsh Local Government Association during the consultation period (Appendix 1) and the Royal Town Planning Institute (Appendix 2).

 

In terms of the position following the adoption of the LDP, the Welsh Government had advised that where this occurs after the annual JHLAS study base date of 1 April the housing land supply figure evidenced during the LDP Examination, which would have been the subject of independent examination, will be the housing land supply figure until the next JHLAS process commences in the following April.  For the Vale of Glamorgan LDP this would be 1 April, 2017 where adoption of the Plan takes place in late 2016 as set out in the Council’s LDP Delivery Agreement.

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for Regeneration, Innovation, Planning and Transportation commented that the Council’s Local Development Plan (LDP) due to be submitted was more sustainable than the previous administration’s submission.   However, she further commented that whilst the Council waited for approval of the LDP submission from the Inspector, in due course, there was a real danger that the Council would receive planning applications that were not sustainable.

 

In addition the Director of Development Services commented that the Council had a seven year plus land supply that would be reduced to zero overnight under the new Technical Advice Note. In acknowledging the need for a suite of Local Development Plans across Wales, the process of producing a Local Development Plan was time consuming and reliant on timescales for consultation set down in statute.  As a result, developing an LDP was not a quick process and until adoption of the Plan the Council would be at risk from unsustainable planning applications.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the implications of the revised Technical Advice Note (TAN) 1 – Joint Housing Local Authority Studies issued by Welsh Government attached at Appendix 1 to the report be noted with regret.

 

(2) T H A T the report be referred to Planning Committee and Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) for information.

 

(3) T H A T the Leader and Cabinet Member for Regeneration, Innovation, Planning and Transportation make strong representations to Welsh Government at Ministerial level as to the consequences of (TAN) 1 on the proper planning of the Vale of Glamorgan.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To note the publication of Technical Advice Note (TAN) 1 Joint Housing Land Availability Studies, and the key planning implications for the Vale of Glamorgan as a result of the new guidance.

 

(2) To advise the Planning Committee and the Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) of the result of the recent public consultation, and to advise Members of the key planning implications for the Vale of Glamorgan as a result of the new guidance.

 

(3) To make representation to the Welsh Government of the significant concerns arising out of the content of TAN 1.

 

C2634  REVISED WASTE MANAGEMENT AND CLEANSING CHARGING ARRANGEMENTS (EVS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) –

 

Agreement was sought for a range of new charges for domestic waste management services.

 

The Council's Revenue Budget for 2014/15 (minute C2212 refers) identified a saving of £100k per annum from 2014/15 from limiting the number of food waste bags provided. Due to a large existing stock it was not necessary to introduce these controls from 1 April, 2014 but they should now be introduced from 1 March, 2015.

 

The Revised Waste Management and Cleansing Charging Arrangements report presented to Cabinet identified specific proposals for charging for waste management services considered necessary to assist in balancing the budget in the service area for 2015/16.

 

The Controlled Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2012 described waste that was to be treated, as 'household waste', 'industrial waste' or 'commercial waste'.  It also specified the types of 'household waste' for which a collection charge may apply. Furthermore, it provided details of those certain types of household waste that were to be treated as commercial waste for the purposes of liability to disposal charges under sections 45(3) and 52(9) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990.  The 2012 Regulations replaced the Controlled Waste Regulations 1992 (S.I.1992 / 558) ("the 1992 Regulations").

 

Included within the 'household wastes' for which the Council could have made a collection charge and that it did not have a statutory duty to collect, were:

 

(i) Garden waste;

(ii) Any article of waste that exceeded 25kg in weight;

(iii) Any article of waste that did not fit into a cylindrical container 750mm in diameter and 1m in length;

(iv) Bulky household furniture waste (a general non-exhaustive guide to what is and what is not bulky household waste items was given for information in Appendix 1 as attached to the report).

 

There were existing Waste Management and Cleansing Service Charges. These charges primarily related to commercial waste collection services, chargeable additional recycling and composting receptacles, slipway, Pier docking charges and filming fees.

 

The Vale was one of only two Councils in Wales that did not levy a charge for its bulky items collection service, the other being the Isle of Anglesey.  The remaining 20 had varying charges ranging from £10 - £34. The Council had previously charged for this service but these charges were withdrawn in the late 1990's. It was proposed that a charge of £15 for up to 3 bulky waste items was introduced from 1 April, 2015. This broadly represented the average rate in Wales for up to 3 items. 

 

Proposed Bulky Items Schedule of Rates:

Number of Bulky Items Collected Charge
Up to 3 Items £15
Additional items (maximum of 5) £5 per item


Residents would still be able to take bulky household items to either of the Council's two Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs), free of charge.

 

The Medium Term Financial Plan identified a sum of £170k in 2015 / 2016 for reviewed charging arrangements for the collection of bulky items.  This amount was going to be achieved by reducing the current three vehicles and crew fleet by one from 1 February, 2015 and then introducing the charges as specified.

 

In 2014 / 2015 there were 12,214 bulky items collected (visits to individual households) between 1 April, 2014 and 7 January, 2015.  On a pro rata basis this represented approximately 16,000 collections for the full year.  It was estimated that the drop off in collections could have been between 50% and 60%, with residents choosing to use other options, such as our HWRC sites, charities and new appliance / equipment manufacturers to address bulky waste issues in future.

 

With a 60% reduction in collection, £96k would be collected in fees and with a 50% reduction the income would be £120k.  The savings from reducing one vehicle and its crew was estimated as circa £70k per annum.  Together the increased revenue and reduced cost should have realised the £170k MTFP figure for 2015 / 2016.

 

It was also recommended that charges were levied as follows:

 

(i) that blue dog waste bags which were presently issued free of charge, were sold for £1.00 per pack of 50, from the 1 April, 2015.

(ii) that a charge of £1 be imposed for kerbside recycling boxes and kitchen waste caddies with effect from 1 April, 2015.

(iii) that after an annual free issue, (based on circa 3 bags a week), any further additional kitchen waste liner bags would be sold by the roll at an equivalent cost of 4p per bag.

(iv) that an administration charge of £15 be introduced for the issue of a HWRC van and trailer permits from the 1 April, 2015.

 

Although it was recognised that further service savings may be required in the future to meet additional efficiency savings, the proposals discussed would make a significant contribution to maintaining the current Waste Management & Cleansing, level of service during 2015 / 2016.

 

It was estimated that the following additional income could be realised:

 

(i) Bulky Collections - Implementation of collection charges (100k) and a reduction in fleet (70k).

(ii) Dog Waste Bags - Implementation of charges based on the 1million bags provided free to residents in 2012/13 would equate to £20,000 new income, based on sales at £1 per 50 bags.

(iii) Recycling boxes and kerbside caddies - using an assumption that 20% of tenants required a replacement, this would equate to approximately 10,000 boxes issued per year and therefore an income of £10,000.

(iv) Administration charge for HWRC permits issue based on 4,573 permits issued in 2013 / 2014 (4573 x £15) would provide an income of £68,595.

 

The total estimated income / savings from the charges highlighted above was £268,595.

 

At the meeting the Leader commented that Paragraph 13 of the report would need to be amended due to a formatting mistake. Currently it read “concessions (as set out in Paragraph 24)” whereas, it was verbally amended at the meeting to read “concessions (as set out in Paragraph 21)”.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision.

 

RESOLVED -

 

(1) T H A T the proposal to charge householders for waste management services as stated within the report, be approved.

 

(2) T H A T the report be forwarded to the Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) for consideration.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To assist in meeting the budgetary challenges in the Waste Management and Cleansing Division of Visible Services.

 

(2) To allow for the Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment) to consider the charging proposals. 

 

C2635  PROVISION OF OLDER PEOPLE’S RESIDENTIAL CARE – HAFOD CONTRACTS AND LEASES (AS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – SOCIAL CARE AND HEALTH) –

 

Approval was sought to terminate the contract with Hafod Community Care for the provision of older people's residential care in the Vale.

 

The former South Glamorgan County Council entered into 25 year contracts and leases with Hafod Community Care in 1991 in relation to 10 older people's residential care homes.  Of this number, two – Ty Dyfan and Ty Dewi Sant - were in the Vale of Glamorgan.  Following the reorganisation of Local Government in 1996, the contracts relating to these two homes transferred to this Council to manage.

 

The terms of the agreement in 1991 were as follows:

  • Under the terms of the Leases to Hafod, the Council received a lease rental payment; and
  • The staff group in the homes were employed by the Council and Hafod made a contribution to these staffing costs, although this did not meet the full costs.

The two long term arrangements – care management contracts and lease – were due to end in July 2016.  The Council sought legal advice in relation to this contract as the working of the current contract was financially very disadvantageous to the Council.  Discussions took place with Hafod to renegotiate the terms of the contract but at that time Hafod were not willing to look at either the placement fees or the level of reimbursement given to the Council regarding staffing costs

 

Via the Council’s Legal Services section, formal communications had been made stating the Council’s intention to bring the current contracts to an end before the official date of July 2016.  These were confirmed in meetings with Hafod in September and November 2014.

 

The financial details of the negotiations were contained in a Part 2 report to the Cabinet meeting.  Both parties had been able to agree terms that would enable the contract to end on 31 March, 2015.  Under the terms of this agreement, the management of the two homes would wholly revert to the Council from April 2015 and the leases would be surrendered.

 

An action plan had been developed to ensure that the transfer of the homes was achieved within the timescale required and with minimal disruption to the residents. The homes would have to be registered with the Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales to operate and Hafod held this registration.  The Council would apply to take this over.  No problems were envisaged with this application as the Council was already registered to provide care in two other older people's homes in the Vale.

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for Adult Services commented that the Hafod contracts and leases had been agreed by the South Glamorgan County Council and that this was just one of the examples of a past decision made that did not work for the people of the Vale of Glamorgan.

 

He further commented that the Council had sought legal advice in relation to the contract as the working of the current contract was financially very disadvantageous to the Council and that a new agreement would result in significant savings as set out in the Part 2 report. 

 

This was a matter for Executive decision.

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the proposal outlined in the report: (a) to negotiate termination by mutual agreement of the contracts with Hafod Community Care for the provision of older people's services at Ty Dyfan and Ty Dewi Sant and (b) to negotiate termination of the Leases (co-terminus with the contracts) in respect of Ty Dyfan and Ty Dewi Sant, be approved.

 

(2) T H A T delegated authority be granted to the Managing Director, Leader, Deputy Leader and Director of Social Services to take the required action to terminate the contracts and leases on the terms outlined in the Part II report on this matter submitted to this meeting.

 

(3) T H A T delegated authority be granted to the Managing Director, and Director of Social Services and the Head of Legal Services to negotiate and agree, and for the Head of Legal Services to sign and execute as appropriate, the Agreement evidencing the termination of the contracts and the surrenders of the leases.

 

(4) T H A T Part 1 and Part 2 of this report be referred to the Scrutiny Committee (Social Care & Health) for information.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To support Social Services to make the budget reductions required to meet the savings identified in the Budget Programme.

 

(2) To ensure that savings to the budget could be made from April 2015.

 

(3) To enable formal documentation of contracts termination and lease surrender.

 

(4) To ensure that the Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health) was aware of these proposed changes.

 

C2636  EXCLUSION OF PRESS AND PUBLIC –

 

RESOLVED – T H A T under Section 100A(4) of the Local Government Act 1972, the press and public be excluded from the meeting for the following item of business on the grounds that it involves the likely disclosure of exempt information as defined in Part 4 of Schedule 12A (as amended) of the Act, the relevant paragraphs of the Schedule being referred to in brackets after the minute heading.

 

C2637  PROVISION OF OLDER PEOPLE’S RESIDENTIAL CARE – HAFOD CONTRACTS AND LEASES (AS) (EXEMPT INFORMATION – PARAGRAPH 14) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – SOCIAL CARE AND HEALTH)  –

 

Cabinet was provided with details regarding the terms negotiated for terminating the contract with Hafod Community Care for the provision of older people's residential care in the Vale.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision.

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the financial consequences of the proposal as detailed in the report be noted.

 

(2) T H A T the decisions made within the Part I report be confirmed.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1&2) To support Social Services in making the budget reductions required to meet the savings identified in the Budget Programme.

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