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Agenda Item No.

 

CABINET

 

Minutes of a meeting held on 23 March, 2015.

 

Present : Councillor N. Moore (Chairman), Councillor S.C. Egan (Vice – Chairman); Councillors: B.E. Brooks, L. Burnett, C.P.J. Elmore and G. John.

 

Also Present:

 

C2693  MINUTES –

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the meeting held on 9 March, 2015 be approved as a correct record.

 

C2694  DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST –

 

The following declarations of interest were received

 

Councillor N. Moore Agenda Item 7 - Annual Leave Purchase Scheme

 

Reason for Declaration –

 

His daughter worked for the Local Authority – He had dispensation from Standards Committee to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Agenda Item 8 - Voluntary Reduction in Working Hours Scheme

 

Reason for Declaration –

 

His daughter worked for the Local Authority – He had dispensation from Standards Committee to speak and vote on the matter.

Councillor S. Egan Agenda Item 7 - Annual Leave Purchase Scheme

 

Reason for Declaration –

 

His wife was employed by the Local Authority – he has dispensation from Standards Committee to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Agenda Item 8 - Voluntary Reduction in Working Hours Scheme

 

Reason for Declaration –

 

His wife was employed by the Local Authority – he has dispensation from Standards Committee to speak and vote on the matter.

 

Agenda Item 17 - Visible Services – Proposed Fees and Charges for 2015 / 2016

 

Reason for Declaration –

 

He was an elected Member of Barry Town Council which managed the Porthkerry Cemetery.

Councillor G. John Agenda Item 17 - Visible Services – Proposed Fees and Charges for 2015 / 2016

 

Reason for Declaration –

 

He was president of Llantwit Major Junior Football Club and a Life member of Llantwit Major AFC.

Councillor C. Elmore Agenda Item 11 - Grants to Community/Voluntary Organisations

 

Reason for Declaration –

 

He was chairman of the Barry YMCA. He was granted dispensation from the Standards Committee to speak, but not vote on the matter.

Councillor B. Brooks Agenda Item 17 - Visible Services – Proposed Fees and Charges for 2015 / 2016

 

Reason for Declaration –

 

She was an elected Member of Barry Town Council which managed the Porthkerry Cemetery.

Councillor L. Burnett Agenda Item 11 - Grants to Community/Voluntary Organisations

 

Reason for Declaration –

 

She was the Local Authority appointee to YMCA Management Board and had been granted dispensation from Standards Committee to speak and vote on the matter.



C2695  VALE OF GLAMORGAN LOCAL ACCESS FORUM – 17 FEBRUARY, 2015 -  

 

The minutes of the Vale of Glamorgan Local Access Forum meeting held on 17 February, 2015 were submitted.

 

Present :  Mr. F. Coleman (Chairman); Mr. M. Dunn (Vice-Chairman); Councillor E. Williams, Mrs. V.M. Hartrey, Mr. J.J. Herbert, Mr. C. Lucas, Mr. H.S. McMillan, Ms. E. Nash, Mr. R. Pittard, Mr. R. Simpson and Mr. G. Thomas.

 

Also present :  Mr. J. Wyatt, Mrs. L. Mills, Mrs. S. Thomas, Mr. G. Teague (Vale of Glamorgan Council) and Ms. S. Tindal (Natural Resources Wales).

 

(a) Apologies for Absence -

 

These were received from Mr. R. Traherne, Mr. S. Lait, Mr. M. Parry and Mr. B. Guy.

(b) Minutes -

 

AGREED - T H AT the minutes of the meeting held on 22nd October, 2014 be approved as a correct record.

 

There were no matters arising from the minutes of the meeting on 22nd October, 2014 and the Secretary confirmed that the response to the cross-compliance consultation had been circulated to all Forum Members.

(c) Wales Coast Path -

 

(i) Update - The Public Rights of Way (PROW) Officer informed the Forum that the Rights of Way Team was currently at the end of a two-year development programme and Natural Resources Wales (NRW) would be liaising with Welsh Government (WG) in relation to the forward plan for the Wales Coast Path Development Programme.

 

A number of projects had been delayed due to issues relating to Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAM), one of which was the surface improvements at Cwm Colhuw. These issues would need to be discussed with CADW.

 

The PROW Officer advised that the team had hoped to roll back a section of the path at Cwm Colhuw; however, they were now returning to their original plan and could not guarantee that this could be completed in this financial year; however, all the necessary specifications had been carried out for it to be completed in 2015/16.

 

It was confirmed that the contractor had completed the work on extending the path and installing a dropped kerb, near to the Captains Wife, Sully.

 

The new ‘Ultitrec’ material had been laid at Porthkerry Park and was supplied free of charge in order for a trial to be carried out. The durability of the new material was currently being monitored by the team.

 

Some exploratory cutbacks had been carried out at Summerhouse Point (East) along the contour of the fortifications. This would need to be assessed and agreed by CADW, following which; a Diversion Order would need to be made to include the new route of the path.

 

The Forum was provided with an update on the progress of work near Ogmore Village. Extensive consultation had taken place, including discussions and agreements with the landowners, the Commons Association and advice from various Council Departments and the Planning Inspectorate, part of the ground works had been started on land owned and consented to by Merthyr Mawr Estates. The works would enable the route of the Wales Coast Path to be lifted off the road and routed over the Common, including a new section of sealed footpaths. It was confirmed that after the works had been completed near Ogmore Village the official route of the Wales Coast Path would be altered to reflect it.

 

Further coastal access work was taking place to connect a path in Rhoose, near the train station, to the Wales Coast Path and involved the roll-back of part of the path, due to erosion caused by water flowing from a drainage channel. There had been cliff falls at a point west of Summerhouse Point where part of the path had collapsed and at Tresillian Bay, west of Llantwit Major. The PROW Officer confirmed that due to the collapse of the path at Tresillian Bay, a section of the fence nearby would be opened up and formalised as part of the Wales Coast Path. He further advised that once the durability of the ‘Ultitrec’ had been tested, and proven, it could be used on other sections of the Wales Coast Path in the future.

 

(ii) Development Programme 2015 Onwards - The Forum was apprised in relation to the proposals collectively agreed by local authorities, (excluding Pembrokeshire) and the NRW’s Wales Coast Path Team (WCPT), for the management and funding arrangements for the Wales Coast Path Programme from 2015. The four Welsh regions comprised of:

  • North - Anglesey, Flintshire, Denbighshire and Conwy
  • Gwynedd - Gwynedd and Snowdonia National Park
  • West - Ceredigion, Powys and Carmarthenshire
  • Pembrokeshire - Pembrokeshire County Council - unless otherwise stated, Pembrokeshire would not be covered by the arrangements for the Wales Coast Path programme from 2015 as it would remain in the National Trail.
  • South - Bridgend, Swansea, Neath/Port Talbot, Vale of Glamorgan, Cardiff, Newport and Monmouthshire.

The PROW Officer confirmed that a successful pilot had taken place within a region comprising the Vale of Glamorgan, Cardiff, Newport and Monmouthshire Councils in relation to sharing a Regional Coast Path Officer. It was likely that these arrangements would be rolled out across the Welsh regions.

 

The officer advised that the main challenges involved with the proposed arrangements in the Vale of Glamorgan’s proposed region was the number of local authorities involved and administration systems used across them. NRW would be the employing organisation for the South Region and the Wales Coast Path Officer would be able to use their procurement system in order to address this.

 

A National Management Group would be created which would consist of the three NRW employed Wales Coast Path Officers, other NRW Wales Coast Path staff, the Gwynedd employed Wales Coast Path Officer, the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park employed National Trail Officer and others as appropriate. The National Management Group would meet in order to ensure consistently high quality of all aspect of the programme in line with national policy, established quality standards and best practice.

 

The Forum was informed that NRW had recommended a two-year programme, however, this could be extended to five years and Ms. Tindal, Senior Recreation and Partnership Officer at NRW advised that, although the budget had yet to be approved it was potentially more positive than previously thought. She expressed appreciation for the letter sent from the Vale of Glamorgan Local Access Forum to Welsh Government in relation to short term funding agreements.

 

The PROW Officer advised that, if a five-year programme was to be agreed, the priorities of the programme may change over its duration. There would be a shift towards maintenance of the Wales Coast Path and marketing of the Path in order to maintain a long distance trail.

 

The proposals in relation to financial arrangements would see the Wales Coast Path infrastructure budget split into three categories. NRW would issue guidance on the types of projects which would fit into each category. In terms of maintenance funding, 75% would be funded by NRW and this would be determined by a formula and distributed as a grant to local authorities. The officer expressed the view that it would be more effective for NRW to hold on to improvement monies as the region would be using one procurement system which would enable the region to employ economies of scale. Maintenance money allocated by formulae would be preferred to be distributed directly to authorities.

 

A discussion ensued in relation to the proposals as follows:

 

 Queries Responses
Would the Regional Management Group be an unnecessary tier of management? The PROW Officer advised that for 2014 a Steering Group had been established which allowed local authorities to maintain connections across the regions. Certain pressures had resulted in the Regional Coast Path Officer being in one area more than others and these were the type of issues that could be dealt with by the Regional Management Group in future.

If Natural Resources Wales was the employing authority, should the Regional Coast Path Officer be the officer from NRW.

Concern was also expressed that if the officer was looking after a large part of the Coast Path a large part of their time would be spent travelling.

Ms. Tindal advised that unfortunately there was not the budget to employ a Regional Coast Path Officer for each local authority. The employment of the Regional Officers had been discussed at length and difficulties had been identified with the Officer being required to follow the procedures of each local authority. It was therefore proposed that NRW would be the employing authority. NRW had formulated a generic recruitment process for each Regional Wales Coast Path Officer with a view to the officers becoming embedded in each local authority to ensure that they were able to pick up upon local issues.

 

All local authorities in the South Region wanted the officer to be hosted by Natural Resources Wales in order to avoid the use of different systems.

 

Ms. Tindal expressed the view that it would be beneficial for the officer to have a desk in each authority and this approach would be run on a trial basis and be subject to change if necessary.

Who would be funding the Regional Coast Path Officer. Ms. Tindal confirmed that NRW would fund the officers.
How would the programme of projects be determined?

The Vale of Glamorgan Council maintenance allocation was proposed to be £19,000 in grant against £26,000 total costs for the maintenance of the Wales Coast Path in the county.

 

Outside of the maintenance allocation each local authority would be required to submit their bids for projects, and these would be taken to the Regional Management Group for a decision. If there was no decision from the Group this would be made by NRW.

 

The Regional Management Group would look at the submissions from each authority against the priorities of the programme and look to distribute the funding accordingly. In the future the funding allocation and prioritisation of funding would be carried out from the view point of the user of the Coast Path. There would be more emphasis on the quality standards and aspirations for the Wales Coast Path. There was the possibility that, due to employing a regional approach, the majority of funding could go to one local authority for certain projects if necessary.



Further concern was expressed in relation to the need for the Regional Management Group and the Chairman expressed the view that planning would be very difficult in the future due to budgetary issues and officers would be unable to make these decisions without discussions across the local authorities. Furthermore, these arrangements would provide an opportunity to discuss priorities prior to any decisions being made.

 

The PROW Officer expressed the view that these proposed arrangements were not too different from the approach taken in managing National Trails, for example, Offa’s Dyke. Ms. Tindal confirmed that these arrangements had been modelled on the Offa’s Dyke approach and expressed the view that working together via a regional approach was best practice.

 

The Chairman expressed the view that as there were now seven local authorities in the South Wales Region, rather than the previous four, the Coast Path Officer would need the support of the Regional Management Group in order to facilitate decision-making.

 

Part of the role of the Wales Coast Path Officer would be to survey the Coast Path in order that the maintenance issues could be flagged up and it was confirmed that this was the first time the authority had been allocated monies from NRW for maintenance.

 

Mr. Pittard asked what processes were in place if there was an emergency, for example, part of the Coast Path collapsed. The PROW Officer advised that they would feed this back to NRW as it was not explicitly stated, however, he was of the opinion that they would look at projects where there had been an underspend which could possibly be used in these cases. The Chairman advised that part of the proposed funding arrangements stated that NRW would consider realignment and improvement priorities on a case by case basis with regard to national priorities and available funding. Ms. Tindal confirmed that in the past underspend monies had been reallocated to other projects, following permission from Welsh Government. However, if there was a very significant issue it was likely that a separate request would be made to Welsh Government. The PROW Officer expressed the view that the discussion of these types of issues was one reason why the Regional Management Group was required.

(d) Modification and Legal Orders Update -

 

The Forum was updated on the Evidential Modification Order Tracking and the Legal Order Tracking Chart. Two new Legal Orders had been received, one in St. Brides Super Ely and one in Lavernock with a consultation start date of 13th February, 2015. It was confirmed that there was realignment work to be carried out at Gileston Farm which was within the consultation period following confirmation of the Order.

(e) Maintenance Update -

 

The Forum received a Maintenance Update which detailed the number of issues logged since 22nd October, 2014, the number of issues resolved since 22nd October, 2014, the number of issues resolved since 27th January, 2011 and the number of unresolved issues remaining.

 

It was confirmed that the figures for the number of issues logged and resolved included all issues from the very minor to the very major. The increase in the logged issues was most likely due to the PI issues from the last quarter being updated onto the system.

 

The PROW Officer informed the Forum that they were close to resolving the smaller issues and the remaining issues would be collated using a project-based approach; these projects would then be passed out to external contractors. Some of the issues remained unresolved due to the nature of the ground condition or building obstructions.

 

The Chairman expressed the view that the general trend was good and the PROW Team should be commended for their work.

(f) Rights of Way Improvement Plan (ROWIP) Update -

 

The Forum received a report detailing the Rights of Way Improvement Plan Update as follows:

 

Project Heading Update
Preparation of the new Definitive Map and the analysis and reporting of CAMS data Rhys Buckley had been taken on as a Foundation Modern Apprentice and was assisting with the work in this area.
Creation and Improvement of PROW links between communities and within Coastal Zone to the Wales Coast Path, including ecological surveys and biodiversity interpretation where necessary. ROWIP match funding of Rural Development Plan improvements was completed though some work remained in concluding agreements at Penllyn Estates for new bridleways
Improvement of the path surface through a wildlife trust, near Llantwit Major, to the Wales Coast Path Work programmed by Glamorgan Wildlife Trust
Review and support of the annual clearance arrangements Completed
Establish focus group including Communities First and Health Agenda representatives to develop and deliver improvements for Low Use groups. Reallocated to improvement of the surface near St. Dyfan and St. Teilos Church.
Improvement of the surface near St. Dyfan and St. Teilos Church Work had been instructed to improve a stretch of path, forming a muddy shortfall of sealed surface from the end of the new tarmac to the existing concrete outside the Church.

 

The Forum was informed that work was due to start on this project.



The Forum was informed that it was anticipated that the ROWIP funding would be granted at a similar level for the next financial year to to that provided for the current year (£31,000).

 

The PROW Officer informed the Forum that the Legal Agreement for the bridleway at Penllyn Estate was currently with the Legal Department and hoped that this would be resolved shortly. He further advised that they hoped to carry out some publicity for the bridleways once the legal agreement had been finalised.

(g) Coastal Access Improvement Programme Funding -

 

The Chairman apprised the Forum in relation to the recent letter that had been sent to the Minister for Natural Resources on behalf of the Local Access Forum and the response from Welsh Government. The letter pertained to the short term nature of the funding for the Coastal Access Improvement Programme. Ms. Tindal advised that the potential funding for the programme was potentially more positive than previously anticipated.

(h) Draft Rights of Way Deregulation Bill (England) -

 

The Forum received a brief summary of the provisions on public path changes in England as part of the Deregulation Bill, which was currently at report stage in the House of Lords and had implications for Public Rights of Way work in England.

 

The changes would not affect Wales at present and the PROW Officer expressed the view that, with devolved powers, England and Wales were starting to diverge on how they dealt with Public Rights of Way legislation. He further informed the Forum that the most important provisions within the Deregulation Bill in terms of Public Rights of Way were Schedule 7 within Clause 26; the introduction of which would make changes to the procedure for examining Public Rights of Way in England on the basis of evidence.

 

The Forum was informed that there was a possibility of a Green Paper in Wales to change PROW legislation. The PROW Officer expressed the view that there needed to be some reform of the legislation in Wales as some was outdated, and this could either take a form similar to the changes to be introduced in England or be something completely different.

(i) Section 106 Monies -

 

The Forum received a document which detailed the Section 106 financial contributions, which could potentially be used towards PROW improvements.

 

The PROW Officer advised that he had been in discussions with the Section 106 Planning Officer in relation to potential opportunities for the Local Access Forum to contribute to the Section 106 discussions, about how these monies could be spent. He expressed the view that a small Working Group could be established in order to facilitate these discussions and this could help focus the work of the PROW Team.

 

The Forum was informed that if any monies were left over once the project use-by date had expired; these would be returned to the developer.

 

It was agreed that the Section 106 Planning Officer would be invited to attend the next meeting of the Local Access Forum to provide further information and advice in relation to Section 106 contributions.

(j) Announcement -

 

Mr. Wyatt, Secretary, advised that due to the expiration of the current term of the Local Access Forum, there would shortly be a recruitment process for the next Forum, and confirmed that the lifespan of the new Forum would begin from the date of the next meeting.

 

The Chairman took the opportunity to thank the current Local Access Forum Members and officers for their time and valued contribution over the last three years.



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RESOLVED – T H A T the minutes of the Vale of Glamorgan Local Access Forum Meeting held on the 17 February, 2015 be noted.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the minutes.

 

C2696  REVENUE AND CAPITAL MONITORING FOR THE PERIOD 1ST APRIL 2014 TO 31st DECEMBER 2014 (REF) -  

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health) on the 2 February, 2015 considered the above report of the Director of Social Services.

 

The Operational Manager, Accountancy, presented the report, the purpose of which was to update Members of the position in respect of revenue and capital expenditure for the period 1st April to 31st December 2014.

 

Revenue – the current end of year forecast for the Social Services budget was an overspend of £100,000.  A table and graph setting out the variance between the profiled budget and actual expenditure to date was attached at Appendix 1 to the report. 

Children and Young People’s Services – this service was currently anticipated to outturn £500,000 (3.5%) under the

Children’s Services budget at year end.  The major issue concerning this service continued to be the pressure on the children’s placement budget.  However, it was currently projected that the Joint Budget for Residential Placements for Looked After Children could outturn with a £100,000 underspend at year end.  Work had been ongoing to ensure that children were placed in the most appropriate and cost effective placements, however, it should be noted that due to the high cost of such placements, the outturn position could fluctuate.  There were potential underspends elsewhere in Children’s Services relating to team budgets of £86,000, £50,000 relating to administrative staff, £50,000 on legal expenses, £60,000 due to additional adoption income and £154,000 on alternative means of provision and accommodation costs required for the current cohort of children.

 

Adult Services – this service was currently anticipated to outturn £600,000 (1.6%) over the Adult Services budget at year end.  This was due to a projected overspend of £800,000 (3.4%) against the Community Care Packages budget.  This was as a result of increased demand for services, particularly for frail older clients.  While the overspend this year had reduced, pressure on the budget would continue into the next financial year as the full year effect of current packages would result in a predicted increase in expenditure of around £1m.  The service would strive to manage demand, which would be supported through the reorganisation of the Care Management Team and the implementation of changes as a result of the Intermediate Care Fund (ICF) and the Regional Care fund (RCF) schemes.  The annual deferred income budget for 2014/15 had been set at £725,000.  As at 31st December 2014 income received was on target, however, there were houses that would be sold subject to contract, but for which the anticipated income was not high and therefore the year end projection had been maintained at a £100,000 under-recovery.  This position was included as part of the underspends elsewhere within Adult Services of around £200,000 which could be used to offset this position.  These areas were £125,000 on staffing, £26,000 on transport, £29,000 on premises and £20,000 on supplies and services. 

 

The ICF grant was only available within the 2014/15 financial year, and a cost pressure had been submitted for consideration as part of the 2015/16 budget process to allow for a transitional period for schemes to be evaluated.  The RCF grant had been approved for 2015/16; however, the amount available was 46% less than previously indicated by the Welsh Government.  This funding covered five collaborative schemes across the Cardiff and Vale region.  Proposals for the revised allocation of funds to the schemes had been submitted to the Welsh Government for consideration.  The allocation of grant to the schemes had been based upon priorities and availability of other funding sources and therefore the reduction had not been consistently applied across all areas.  The remodelling adult social care and integration with health strand had been given more favourable treatment.

 

Capital – Attached at Appendix 2 to the report was financial progress on the Capital Programme as at 31st December 2014, while at Appendix 3 to the report was non-financial information on capital construction schemes. 

 

The report outlined that the Boiler Replacement work at Hen Goleg had increased by £14,000 due to leaks being identified during works on the site.  This additional spend would be funded from a revenue contribution to the scheme.  Also, the start date for works to the Clock Tower were dependent upon receipt of Listed Building Consent.  This application should be received by CADW during February, with a decision being anticipated within 12 weeks.  The works would therefore not start on site until the next financial year.  It was therefore requested that £98,000 be carried forward into 2015/16. 

 

For all schemes where it was evident that the full year’s budget would not be spent during the year, the relevant officers were required to provide an explanation for the shortfall which would be taken to the earliest available Cabinet meeting.

 

Social Services Budget Programme Update – On 5th March 2014, Council had approved savings targets for 2014/15 and the initial savings targets for 2015/16 and 2016/17. 

 

As part of the Medium Term Financial Plan, approved by Cabinet on 11th August 2014, it had been agreed that the service remodelling savings, included in 2015/16 and 2016/17 would be re-phased and were now set at £320,000 in 207/18, £320,000 in 2018/19 and £330,000 in 2019/20. 

 

The Directorate was currently required to find savings totalling £3.97m by the end of 2019/20.  Total identified savings amounted to £4.156m which would show a surplus of £186,000.  This surplus was as a result of the Foster Carer Recruitment Project which could be used to mitigate any additional savings to be found in future years. 

 

The following table showed the approved savings targets and the savings identified by year.  It included the £293,000 identified in 2012/13 in excess of the saving target for that year. 

 

Savings

Required

 

£000

Savings

Identified

 

£000

In Year

Surplus/

(Shortfall)

£000

Cumulative

Surplus/

(Shortfall)

£000

Previously Identified Savings 293 293 293
2014/15 713 454 (259) 34
2015/16 1,125 1,201 76 110
2016/17 1,162 1,238 76 186
2017/18 320 320 0 186
2018/19 320 320 0 186
2019/20 320 320 0 186
TOTAL 3,970 4,156


Contained within Appendix 4 was further detail on the progress for each savings project.

 

A report presented to Cabinet on 26th January 2015 regarding the Council’s Reshaping Services Change Programme acknowledged that the Social Services Directorate already had two major initiatives underway, these being the Collaborative Working Programme and the Budget Programme.  These Programmes already contained projects which were progressing the opportunities identified as part of the Reshaping Services Programme and savings targets were already included within the Budget Programme.

 

The Social Services Directorate was committed to achieving a balanced budget.  The Corporate Budget Programme Board for Social Services and project teams overseeing the plan would continue to develop it further and ensure delivery and progress.  Progress updates would be reported as part of the overall financial monitoring report for the Directorate.

 

In providing an update in regard to the Intermediate Care Fund (ICF), the Director of Social Services advised the Committee that despite his best efforts, the Welsh Government (WG) was unable to provide a definitive response around the plans for introducing the new Integrated Care grant.  He went on to advise that it was anticipated that most of the money would be apportioned to the NHS but that there may be a requirement for a pooled budget in order to progress some of the projects begun under the ICF grant money.  He informed Members that the service could provide a positive evaluation of the projects undertaken and that there was a good case for ensuring that these projects would continue. 

 

Further to this a Committee Member queried as to what effect changes to the ICF grant would have upon budgets.  In response the Director of Social Services advised that the timing of the announcement was very difficult for the Local Authority and it would have been better if this announcement had been made two or three months earlier.  He stated that there would be a need to make best use of the new Fund and RCF budgets in tandem and to look at what elements could be possibly funded through the RCF funding stream. 

 

A Committee Member asked if the Committee could be provided with some clarification of the Flying Start grant money approved by WG.  In response, the Head of Children and Young People Services advised that the grant would be used to fund three capital projects.  The first related to the setting up of a facility in Colcot, the second related to the Red Robins Project and was aimed at enhancing that facility and the third project was around improving the outside space at Cwm Talwg. 

 

In referring to the Flying Start facility at the Red Robin Nursery site, a Committee Member queried whether this would help ensure the future viability of the respite provision for disabled children, which was also located there.  In response, the Committee noted that the two were not connected.  The primary aim was to look at how best to use all physical assets and, although there were synergies, these were still separate services.

 

The Chairman queried whether any other plans for Flying Start capital projects were being drawn up and whether these could be devised more quickly.  The Director of Social Services commented that this was one of the burdens in having fixed term grants for capital projects.  It was difficult for the Service to devise plans around capital programmes when not enough detail was provided by WG when issuing capital grants, often at very short notice. 

 

In querying the future provision of respite care, the Committee was advised that some changes had been made to the start and finishing times for overnight respite stays. This had resulted in earlier pick up times, and thus a reduction in staffing hours, but had maintained the number of nights available.  The Committee also noted that the service was exploring possibilities around the use of the respite facility developed through the Penarth Learning Community. 

 

A Committee Member, referring to a report to the Scrutiny Committee (Housing and Public Protection) on options for increasing older persons’ accommodation, queried whether a similar report would be presented to this Scrutiny Committee.  In response, the Head of Business Management and Innovation informed the Committee that a similar report would be presented to the Scrutiny Committee, probably during the summer.  She further advised that an officer working group, of which she was the Chair, was looking at a number of options around older persons’ accommodation and was evaluating which were the most appropriate.  This project was supported by the Wales Co-operative Centre and a report would be presented to Cabinet in due course. 

 

Having considered the report, the Committee

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1) T H A T the position with regard to the 2014/15 revenue and capital monitoring be noted.

 

(2) T H A T the progress made in delivering the Social Services Budget Programme be noted and referred to Cabinet for information.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1) That Members are aware of the position with regard to the 2014/15 revenue and capital monitoring relevant to this Scrutiny Committee.

 

(2) That Members are aware of the progress made to date on the Social Services Budget Programme.”

 

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Cabinet having considered the recommendations of the Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health)

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the contents of the report.

 

C2697  REQUEST FOR CONSIDERATION OF MATTER (COUNCILLOR R.J. BERTIN) – THE MEALS ON WHEELS SERVICE (REF) - 

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health) considered the above request for consideration of the meals on Wheels Service from Councillor R.J. Bertin.

 

In presenting the request, Councillor Bertin stated that recent reports in the press highlighted that the number of people receiving Meals on Wheels had dropped by half. It was therefore appropriate for the Scrutiny Committee to be provided with information regarding the numbers using the Meals on Wheels Service and the potential for future funding reductions. 

 

The Head of Adult Services, in response to the Request for Consideration, presented a report which advised that Meals on Wheels was a social care service that delivered hot meals to people at home which were assessed as being unable to undertake these tasks for themselves.  Within Barry, one Meals on Wheels route was currently facilitated through a Service Level Agreement with the Royal Voluntary Service.  Volunteers delivered the meals from Rondell House. 

 

At present there was no statutory requirement for the local authority to provide a Meals on Wheels Service.  However, the local authority must assess the needs of individuals to ensure that, where there eligible risk to independence, these risks were mitigated through the provision of services.  Those that experience risks associated with potential malnutrition would be eligible for a service to ensure that their needs were met.  This could be met in various ways and not just through the delivery of a hot meal by the local authority.  For example, frozen meal delivery services had proved to be popular.  The principle advantages were that individuals had greater choice over what and when they could eat, without any requirement for an assessment by Social Services.  Some schemes in other local authority areas would involve the provision of vouchers which could be used in local facilities such as cafes.  Additionally, a number of pension clubs and day services exist across the Vale of Glamorgan, providing not only meals but also an opportunity to engage with other people. 

 

Members noted that the use of the Meals on Wheels Service had reduced substantially across the United Kingdom.  Recent figures for England, reported following a Freedom of Information request, indicated that the number of elderly people receiving meals provided by local authorities had fallen in the last five years from 296,000 to around 109,000.  The position across Wales varied.  In 2013/14, six local authority areas did not provide a Meals on Wheels Service, with a further three indicating that they would discontinue it in 2014/15. 

 

Within the Vale of Glamorgan, the number of people that use the Meals on Wheels Service had reduced significantly.  The service was delivering approximately 112 meals per day in 2002 and now the figure was approximately 78.  At weekends, a reduced service would be in operation and would deliver approximately 40 meals to the central and eastern Vale.  The Meals on Wheels service at the furthest end of the western Vale was discontinued several years ago, following equipment failure in the local kitchen.  Alternative meal services were available.  Low demand levels and the additional distances involved in delivering to rural locations in the western Vale meant that recommencing the service in this area was likely to incur additional costs. 

 

The charge for a meal in the Vale of Glamorgan was £3.30 in 2013/14 and had risen to £4.10 in 2014/15.  This was to bring the charge closer to the costs of preparing and delivering meals.  Reductions for the numbers of meals provided meant that the expected rise in overall income through the price increase had not been fully realised.  Based on the existing level of use, the price per meal would need to rise by just over £1.00 for the service to become cost neutral. 

 

During 2013/14, the costs across Wales varied between £2.35 and £4.00.  In 2014/15, the cost varied between £2.60 and £5.00.  It was therefore evident that authorities across Wales were seeking to increase the income generated by the service to reduce their overall costs. 

 

In the Vale of Glamorgan, all Meals on Wheels were now prepared from the kitchen at Rondell House.  This had enabled the service to be sustainable to date, even though the number of deliveries had reduced.  However, the changing pattern of demand and the associated reduction in numbers meant that they would be prudent to initiative a more comprehensive review of the service to consider how the needs of the population could be best met in the future.  This would involve engaging with service users, carers and representative organisations to ascertain their wishes and views, including the merits of alternative models of provision. 

 

A Committee Member, in referring to the comprehensive review of the service, enquired as to when this was likely to take place.  The Head of Adult Services advised that this would depend upon where the Directorate wished to go with the Meals on Wheels Service, for example whether there was a need to find quick cost savings.  At the moment, the context of the review was too narrow to identify if the service would be viable at its current level in supporting around 80 individuals.  Further to this, the Director of Social Services commented that he understood the need for the Scrutiny Committee to be reassured but, as with all service matters and remodelling, there was a set process to be followed before any recommendations could be made which included, for example, engagement with service users. 

 

At this point, the Chairman recommended that a report in relation to the findings from the comprehensive review to be presented to the Scrutiny Committee before any formal decisions had been made. 

 

In referring to the decision to discontinue the service within parts of the Western Vale, the Committee was advised that this was as a result of a breakdown of the oven at the local kitchen.  This affected 23 service users, six of whom were able to make their own arrangements, while a further six agreed to be provided meals through an alternative model.  Four further clients had been in receipt of home care and thus their meal provision was provided as part of their care package, whilst for the remaining clients further information needed to be acquired.  It was noted that for those individuals who had received the alternative meal service positive feedback had been received and they had liked the flexibility and the choices offered by the changes.  Members were asked to note that there were a number of reasons as to why an alternative model might be better for the majority of people.  In terms of promotion of the Meals on Wheels Service, the Head of Adult Services advised that the service would encourage people to acquire services that would help them support themselves and he cited the Dinas Powys Luncheon Club as an example of this.  A traditional Meals on Wheels was not always the most appropriate way of meeting a person’s needs and could be fairly inflexible.  He advised that all Local Authorities in Wales offered an alternative Meals on Wheels Service provided through a commercial partner and he stated that he knew of six Local Authorities within Wales that did not provide any Meals on Wheels provision. 

 

The Director of Social Services stated that Council needed to be careful that it achieved value for money in all areas and it was important for the Council to consider how to make the best use of its resources.  Maintaining some services could potentially impact upon the budgets of other service areas and there was a need to consider alternative service delivery models where appropriate.

 

RECOMMENDED -

 

(1) T H A T the Scrutiny Committee notes the content of the report.

 

(2) T H A T the report be referred to Cabinet.

 

(3) T H A T a further report be received by the Scrutiny Committee detailing the outcomes and findings from the comprehensive review.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1) To ensure that the Scrutiny Committee can exercise oversight of the service.

 

(2) In order to update Cabinet on the developments within the Meals on Wheels Service.

 

(3) To ensure that the Scrutiny Committee had effective oversight of decisions affecting the Meals on Wheels Service.”

 

----------------------------------------------

 

Cabinet having considered the recommendations of the Scrutiny Committee (Social Care and Health)

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the contents of the report.

 

C2698  ANNUAL LEAVE PURCHASE SCHEME (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) - 

 

Cabinet was asked to consider and endorse the proposed annual leave purchase scheme that was attached at Appendix A to the report. 

 

The scheme would enable employees to voluntarily increase their annual leave allowance by buying additional leave (subject to certain conditions). The main advantages would be to offer a flexible, employee benefit that would provide financial savings to the Council.

 

The scheme would also contribute towards achieving savings through a reduction in salary costs, contributions for National Insurance and possibly a reduction in pension contributions where the employee was a member of the pension scheme.

 

The draft scheme would enable employees to request to purchase either 5 or 10 days additional annual leave each year. Part time staff would be eligible to purchase a pro rata entitlement based on their contracted hours. Additional purchased leave would be added to the employee’s existing annual leave entitlement and would be accounted for before any other contracted annual leave.

 

During the meeting, the Leader highlighted Paragraphs 11 and 12 of the report, which stated that employees with a birthday leave year would be required to change to an annual leave year from 01 April to 31 March to take advantage of this scheme, which was necessary to comply with Local Government Pension Scheme (2014) regulations. However, all other conditions in relation to annual leave would remain the same.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the implementation of the proposed annual leave purchase scheme as attached at Appendix A to the report on an initial trial basis of one year be approved.

 

(2) T H A T an interim report outlining a review of the trial be brought to Cabinet in December 2015 following the implementation of the scheme.

 

(3) T H A T delegated authority be granted to the Head of Human Resources to develop appropriate guidance on the implementation of the scheme.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To help contribute to current savings targets across all service areas and increase flexibility for both the Council's Services as well as employees.

 

(2) To provide Members with the opportunity to review the response to the scheme and to consider recommendations on whether the scheme should continue on a more permanent basis.

 

(3) To support employees and managers with the application of the scheme.

 

C2699  VOLUNTARY REDUCTION IN WORKING HOURS SCHEME (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) -  

 

Cabinet was asked to consider and endorse the proposed voluntary reduction in working hours scheme that was attached at Appendix A to the report.

 

Discussions had been progressing with the trade unions in relation to continuing budget challenges faced by the Council. The proposed voluntary reduction in working hours scheme was one element of an overall framework agreement reached with the recognised trade unions as set out in the Cabinet report of 17 November, 2014.

 

The scheme would provide employees with the opportunity to apply for flexible working, in particular to access a reduction in their working hours, to suit their personal circumstances. Requests would be considered and supported by managers wherever possible on a defined or permanent duration subject to the agreement of the employee and the manager and to the exigencies of the service.

 

The report set out the scope for those who the scheme was available and the eligibility criteria for employees to be able to submit an application to reduce their working hours.

 

The scheme would also contribute towards achieving savings through a reduction in salary costs, employer contributions for National Insurance and potentially pension contributions for those in membership of the Local Government (LGPS) or the Teacher's Pension scheme.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the proposed voluntary reduction in working hours scheme attached at Appendix A to the report be approved.

 

(2) T H A T a six month review be undertaken and an update report outlining the impact and take up of the scheme be brought to Cabinet later this financial year.

 

(3) T H A T delegated authority be given to the Head of Human Resources to develop appropriate guidance on the implementation of the scheme.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To help contribute to current savings targets across all service areas and increase flexibility for both the Council's Services as well as employees.

 

(2) To provide Members with the opportunity to review the response to the scheme and to consider recommendations on whether the scheme could be improved.

 

(3) To support employees and managers with the application of the scheme.

 

C2700  EXTERNAL FUNDING: RECYCLING RESOURCES CENTRE AND YOUTH WORK STRATEGY SUPPORT GRANT 2015/16 (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) - 

 

Cabinet was informed of two externally funded projects.

 

The Collaborative Change Programme (CCP) was a joint initiative between the Welsh Government, Welsh Local Government Association (WLGA) and the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP). Its purpose was to assist local authorities to meet future Local Authority Recovery Targets (LART), improve environmental outcomes and reduce the financial costs of resource management services.

A Capital Bid was submitted in October 2014 for this project to form part of the Council's capital programme. However, due to the limit of Capital funding available, it was suggested that external funding should be sought. Should the bid be successful in gaining external funding, the grant would be subject to its own more detailed Cabinet report in due course. 

 

The Youth Work Support Grant was annual funding from Welsh Government that was allocated to every local authority on a formula share; the funding would be allocated for four years as of 2014/15. The grant could be used to support implementation of the Youth Engagement and Progression Framework implementation plan, to support open provision to meet local need and fill gaps identified within the Local Authority Single Integrated Plan.  

 

The Council's External Funding Steering Group (EFSG) considered the two bids at its meeting of 11 February, 2015 in terms of exit strategy, risks and implications for the Council. Both projects were given the support of the EFSG.  

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the bid submitted for the Collaborative Change Capital Grant and its proposed use for a Recycling Resource Centre be approved. 

 

(2) T H A T the proposals for use of the Youth Work Strategy Support Grant, including on-going responsibilities as lead body for the grant be approved.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To approve work on the Collaborative Change Programme proposal for a Recycling Resource Centre.

 

(2) To enable the work of the Youth Work Strategy Support programme to continue.

 

C2701  CYD CYMRU – WALES TOGETHER (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) –

 

The views of Cabinet were sought in respect of monies received from Cardiff Council in respect of the Cyd Cymru - Wales Together collective energy switching project which was being led by the City of Cardiff and Vale of Glamorgan Councils.

 

During its first year the project had successfully helped over 1,500 households in Wales to switch to a cheaper energy tariff.  For every person that switched with Cyd Cymru - Wales Together, money was paid by the energy supplier to a Community Fund. For 2013/14 these switches generated just over £19,000 for the Community Fund.

 

The Authority had received a cheque of £2,370.53 for its Community Fund for year 1 of Cyd Cymru - Wales Together. 

 

It was agreed by the Cyd Cymru - Wales Together Project Board that the Community Fund would be donated to a local charity of the Authority's choice or spent on local initiatives that would support and benefit communities on fuel poverty alleviation and energy efficiency in the Authority's area.

 

At the meeting the Leader noted that the Foodbanks highlighted in the report all demonstrated a track record of running their organisation successfully in providing important support to local communities.

 

The Cabinet Member for Regeneration commented that a shop in Penarth had recently been acquired by the Tabernacle Church for use as a Foodbank, and she requested that the Council approached the organisation to see if they could become an approved Foodbank provider and therefore become eligible to receive funding in the future.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED – T H A T a donation of £2370.53 be paid to Vale Foodbank to be split equally between the four Vale of Glamorgan distribution centres which are; Barry Tennyson Road, Barry St Marys Church Holton Road, Dinas Powys and Llantwit Major.

 

Reason for decision

 

To provide funds to organisations as required.

 

C2702  GRANTS TO COMMUNITY / VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) - 

 

Approval was sought to award a grant from the corporate revenue budget.

 

Grant applications had been received from St Donats Art Centre and the Vale of Glamorgan Festival in respect of delivery of a programme of activities and events.

 

In terms of previous funding, St Donats Art Centre had received an allocation of £35K grant funding from the Council in 2012/13, 2013/14 and 2014/15. The Vale of Glamorgan Festival received an allocation of £11.5K grant funding from the Council in 2012/13, 2013/14 and 2014/15. Also the Barry YMCA had received £3.2K for Ground Rent in 2012/13, 2013/14 and 2014/15.

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for Children’s Services and Schools declared an interest in this item as Chairman of the Barry YMCA and although he had dispensation to speak on the matter, he did not vote.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T a grant be awarded to St Donats Arts Centre of £30K in 2015/16, £25K in 2016/17 and £20K in 2017/18.

 

(2) T H A T a grant be awarded to Vale of Glamorgan Festival of £10K in 2015/16, 2016/17 and 2017/18.

 

(3) T H A T a grant be awarded to YMCA £3.2K for Ground Rent in 2015/16, 2016/17 and 2017/18.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To enable the delivery of a year round programme of professional and community arts activities for the public at St Donats Art Centre.

 

(2) To enable the delivery of a programme of events at a number of venues across the Vale of Glamorgan as part of the Vale of Glamorgan Festival.

 

(3) To enable the YMCA to continue to fund the ground rent chargeable on the site.

 

C2703  GRANTS TO VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS 2015/16 (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) -

 

Approval was sought to award a grant from the 2015/16 corporate revenue budget.

 

The Authority had previously awarded a 3 year grant of £84,000 per annum to Vale Centre for Voluntary Services (VCVS) and £32,500 per annum to the Vale Volunteer Bureau (VVB) which both expired on 31 March, 2015. The two separate organisations were proposing to be merged by the 1 July, 2015 at the latest.

 

It was proposed that initially a 1 year grant be awarded in the sum of £116,500 to VCVS, and that this funding would include the previous funding to the VVB.

 

Thereafter a 3 year grant could be considered taking account of how far reshaping services had developed in the Authority and the impact of the proposed merger between VCVS and VVB.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED – T H A T a grant of £116,500 be made to Vale Centre for Voluntary Services (VCVS), which now encompassed the Vale Volunteer Bureau, for the 2015/16 financial year.

 

Reason for decision

 

To award monies to assist a voluntary organisation.

 

C2704  LOCAL AVERAGE INTEREST RATE (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) - 

 

Approval was sought to recommend the rate of interest to be charged on Council mortgages. The rate of interest currently charged on our mortgages was 5.83%.  The local average interest rate had been calculated at 5.73%, and the Standard National Rate of interest was 3.13%.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the Authority declared local average rate of interest on all new loans of 5.73% from 1 March, 2015 and that the rate of interest on all existing variable housing loans including the sale of Council dwellings be reduced from 5.83% to 5.73% with effect from 1 April, 2015.

 

Reason for decision

 

To recalculate the interest rate in accordance with statutory requirements.

 

C2705  TIMETABLE OF MEETINGS: MAY 2015 – MAY 2016 (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) -

 

Cabinet was asked to consider proposed changes to the dates of the Full Council Meetings in May 2015 and May 2016.

Cabinet on 23 February, 2015 considered a Timetable of Meetings for the period May 2015 - May 2016.  The timetable was approved subject to a further report being submitted setting out new dates for Full Council Meetings in May 2015 and May 2016.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the dates of the Full Council meetings in May 2015 and May 2016 be approved as

 

2015 Council Meeting - 29th April

  Annual Meeting - 13th May

 

 

2016 Council Meeting - 27th April

  Annual Meeting - 11th May

 

Reason for decision

 

To avoid Full Council meetings having to take place shortly before elections in 2015 and 2016.

 

C2706  USE OF MANAGING DIRECTOR’S EMERGENCY POWERS (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEES – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT, CORPORATE RESOURCES, LIFELONG LEARNING) -  

 

Cabinet was advised of the exercising of Emergency Powers by the Managing Director since the last report in June 2014.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the exercising of the Managing Director’s Emergency Powers as indicated below be noted –

 

(a) Authority to extend the Highway Emergency and Permanent Repairs Contracts until 31 March, 2015 with no increase to the tendered rates.  The contract was originally tendered in 2012/13 to LGA Ltd.

 

(Scrutiny - Economy and Environment)

 

(b) Authority to replace and to amend the Membership of the Scrutiny Committees (Economy and Environment), (Lifelong Learning) and (Housing and Public Protection) as follows -

• To replace Councillor Ms. R. Birch with Councillor G. Roberts (Scrutiny Committee (Economy and Environment))

• To replace Councillor Mrs. A.J. Moore with Councillor Ms. K.E. Edmunds (Scrutiny Committee (Lifelong Learning))

• To replace Councillor Mrs. A.J. Moore with Councillor Mrs. P. Drake (Scrutiny Committee (Housing and Public Protection)).

 

(Scrutiny - as indicated above)

 

(c) Authority in respect of the Wales Re-evaluation Rate Relief Scheme 2014/15 to accept and use grant money in the sum of £153,062 from the Welsh Government for 2014/15.

 

(Scrutiny - Corporate Resources)

 

(d) Wales Retail Relief Scheme 2014/15 - Authority to use the grant money in the sum of £564,179 from the Welsh Government for 2014/15.

 

(Scrutiny - Corporate Resources)

 

(e) Service Level Agreement for hosting Coastal Access Officer - Authority to accept and sign the Service Level Agreement to support the hosting of the Regional Coastal Access Officer financed by Natural Resources Wales.

 

(Scrutiny - Economy and Environment)

 

(f) Welsh Government Tackling Poverty Fund - Vale of Glamorgan Council grant application for the resettlement of Barry - Authority to undertake the following actions:

• That the proposed use of the Tackling Poverty Fund set out in the Outline Business Case and Project Schedule spreadsheet be authorised as the Council's application to the Welsh Government for grant funding.

• That subject to the Minister agreeing to support the proposals, the grant offer be included in the Authority's Capital Programme 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17.

 

(Scrutiny - Economy and Environment)

 

(g) Authority to replace Councillor Mrs. P. Drake on the Scrutiny Committee (Housing and Public Protection) with Councillor Mrs. A.J. Moore.

 

(Scrutiny - Corporate Resources)

 

(h) 2013/14 Capital Slippage Request - Authority to allow the approval for slippage of underspends for committed capital budgets for 2013/14 into 2014/15 and to authorise the Barry Regeneration Budget for 2014/15 be increased to reflect contributions from Development Services reserves of £50,000 and a provision set aside for Barry Regeneration in 2013/14 of £326,000.

 

(Scrutiny - Corporate Resources)

 

(i) Valleys Lines Electrification - Accelerated Structures - To grant delegated authority to the Director of Visible Services and Housing in consultation with the Cabinet Member for Environment and Visible Services to sign the Network Rail's form F006 Road/Highway Authority Agreement to bridge works for Gileston Over-bridge; Claypitt Way Over-bridge and Gluepot Over-bridge.

 

(Scrutiny - Economy and Environment)

 

(j) Section 106 Capital Schemes - Authority to include the undermentioned schemes in the 2014/15 Capital Programme:

• The Herberts - £13,618

• 20mph zone at Llandough - £20,000.

 

(Scrutiny - Corporate Resources)

 

(k) Salary for the Head of School Improvement and Inclusion - Authority to appoint the preferred candidate at the highest point of the Head of Services grade, but in accordance with 'transitional' arrangements. 

 

(Scrutiny - Corporate Resources)

 

(l) Welsh Government Tackling Poverty Fund - Deed of Grant and required legal documentation for a project to be managed/delivered by a third party - Authority to instruct the Head of Legal Services and Operational Manager (Legal Services) to prepare, complete and execute the Deed of Grant and required legal documentation to enable Barry YMCA to deliver the project identified in the Council's Tackling Poverty Fund application and to authorise the Head of Legal Services and the Operational Manager (Legal Services) to prepare, complete and execute the Deed of Grant and required legal documentation to enable Vale Centre for Voluntary Services to deliver the project identified in the Council's Tackling Poverty Fund application.

 

(Scrutiny - Economy and Environment)

 

(m) Increase procurement costs to meet 1/6th payment for the 2013/14 and 2014/15 financial years to allow the continued participation in the joint Organic Procurement with Cardiff City Council for long term AD treatment capacity (Cabinet Min. C1846 refers) - Authority to make higher value payments without referring the matter back to Cabinet.

 

(Scrutiny - Economy and Environment)

 

(n) NJC for Local Government Services - 2014-16 Pay Award - Authority to implement the 2014/16 new pay scales and allowances. 

 

(Scrutiny - Corporate Resources)

 

(o) Joint Negotiating Committee for Local Authority Craft and associated employees - 2014/16 pay award - Authority to implement the 2014/16 craft pay rates.

 

(Scrutiny - Corporate Resources)

 

(p) Change of allocation of agreed funding of a demountable building from Llangan Primary School to Romilly Primary School - Authority to reallocate Llangan Demountable monies to Romilly Primary School for a replacement nursery building; Authority to reallocate Section 106 monies from the proposed classroom extension plan to support the cost of an extended demountable building at Llanfair Primary School and that the £69,000 shortfall identified from underspends in respect of Rhoose guttering, Holton Road Primary School - Replacement of mains below the main hall, St. Cyres demolition (underspend) and St. Andrews toilets (underspend) be vired over to the Llanfair demountable budget to support the delivery of the extended plans.

 

(Scrutiny - Lifelong Learning)

 

(q) Boverton Flood Alleviation Scheme - Authority to grant delegated authority to the Director of Visible Services and Housing in consultation with the Cabinet Member for the Environment and Visible Services to –

• Appoint a consultancy to undertake the additional ground investigation works

• Appoint a contractor to undertake the CCTV survey.

 

(Scrutiny - Economy and Environment)

 

(r) Retrospective Approval of the Acceptance of the 4 Schools Primary Learning Hub Grant - £125,000.

 

(Scrutiny - Lifelong Learning)

 

(s) Carbon Management Fund - Authority to increase the Council's Carbon Management Fund in 2014/15 Capital Programme by £103,000 to £176,000 with the increase funded by an increased contribution from the Carbon Management Fund Reserve in 2014/15.

 

(Scrutiny - Corporate Resources)

 

(t) Increase the Capital Loan Scheme for schools from £300,000 to £352,000 - Authority to increase the Schools Capital Loan Scheme by £52,000 to be funded by a contribution from the Schools Rationalisation and Improvement Reserve to fund the costs associated with a loan to Evenlode Primary School towards the cost of a new hall in 2014/15.

 

(Scrutiny - Lifelong Learning)

 

(u) Paget Road to Penarth Portway Woodland Path - Authority to include the Paget Road to Penarth Portway Woodland Path in the Penarth Heights Highways and Sustainable Transport Projects Scheme and that the 2014/15 Capital Programme be increased by £40,000 to be funded by a contribution from Section 106 monies.

 

(Scrutiny - Economy and Environment)

 

(v) Sycamore Cross Junction A48/Five Mile Lane Scheme - Authority to increase the 2014/15 Capital Programme by £11,591 in respect of the Sycamore Cross Junction A48/Five Mile Lane Scheme to be funded by grant carried forward from 2012/13.

 

(Scrutiny - Economy and Environment)

 

(w) Dock Offices - Electrical Power Upgrade - Authority to increase the 2014/15 Capital Programme by £26,000 in respect of the Dock Offices - Electrical Power Upgrade Scheme to be funded from the Project Fund.

 

(Scrutiny - Corporate Resources)

 

(x) Hensol Sustainable Transport Facilities - Authority to increase the 2014/15 Capital Programme by £17,063 in respect of the Hensol Sustainable Transport Facilities Scheme to be funded by Section 106 monies.

 

(Scrutiny - Economy and Environment)

 

(y) Acceptance of Welsh Government Schools Challenge Cymru Funding through the Central South Consortia for Barry Comprehensive School £218,600 - Authority to amend the 2014/15 Capital Programme to include the capital funding elements of the Consortia's Challenge Cymru Grants in the sum of £29,600.

 

(Scrutiny - Lifelong Learning)

 

(z) Additional Capital Schemes - Authority to vire £70,000 from the Penarth Esplanade/Cliff Road Improvements Scheme with £40,000 to be vired to the Victoria Park balustrading refurbishment and replacement scheme and £30,000 to be vired to the Goods Shed, Hood Road Scheme to cover the forecasted overspend and to complete the works on the ground floor.

 

(Scrutiny - Economy and Environment)

 

(aa) Dinas Powys to Cardiff Corridor Bus Priority Measures - Authority to increase the 2014/15 Capital Programme by £52,500 to be funded via grant from Welsh Government.

 

(Scrutiny - Economy and Environment)

 

(bb) Change of Allocation of Agreed Funding of the Flat Felt Rood (Kitchen) Ysgol Gyfun Bro Morgannwg to St Helens RC Infant and Junior School (Toilet and Classroom Refurbishment) and Llansannor Church in Wales Primary School (Replacement of a Wooden Pathway and Access Ramp) - Authority to reallocate monies from the replacement of a section of Bro Morgannwg roof project to the undermentioned projects

• St. Helens Roman Catholic Infant and Junior School - Phase 1, toilets, classroom refurbishment - £62,500

• Llansannor Church in Wales Primary School - Replacement of pathway, access ramp and fencing across the rear of the school - £17,500.

 

(Scrutiny - Lifelong Learning)

 

(cc) Allocation of Additional Education Asset Renewal to be utilised for Victorian Schools Strategy - Authority to allocate an allocation of £75,000 of the additional Education Asset Renewal Budget to fund external consultancy services; to allocate £462,000 of the Additional Education Asset Renewal Budget to increase the existing budget for 'overboarding ceilings' in the 2014/15 Capital Programme to £585,000; an allocation of £20,000 of the Additional Education Asset Renewal budget to increase the existing budget for 'Victorian Primary Schools - emergency roofing' in the 2014/15 Capital Programme to £40,000 and the remaining £43,000 of the Additional Education Asset Renewal budget be allocated to fund emergency/urgent works (should they be required).

 

(Scrutiny - Lifelong Learning)

 

(dd) Demountable Accommodation: Llanfair Primary School, Romilly Primary School and Flying Start at Colcot Primary School (Tender Acceptance) - Authority to accept the tender from Encon Construction Ltd for the undertaking of the principal and groundworks contracts role at the three sites in the sum of £480,563.29 and to accept the negotiated tender of Wernick Buildings Ltd for the design, supply and installation of demountable accommodation at the three sites in the sum of £558,562.00.

 

(Scrutiny - Lifelong Learning)

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the use of the Managing Director’s Emergency Powers.

 

C2707  SCHOOL ADMISSION ARRANGEMENTS 2016/2017 (CSS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – LIFELONG LEARNING) - 

 

Cabinet was advised of the conclusion of the Council’s statutory consultation exercise on school admission arrangements for Community Schools in accordance with the Education (Determination of Admission Arrangements) (Wales) Regulations 2006.

 

A Local Authority had a statutory duty to consult on school admission arrangements annually. The school admission arrangements for the academic year 2016/2017 had to be determined by 15 April, 2015.

 

The School Admissions Policy was issued for consultation on 10 January, 2015 to Headteachers and chairs of governors of all schools in the Vale, neighbouring Local Authorities and Diocesan Directors of Education. Responses were required by 1 March, 2015.

 

The Authority was required to produce a document each year for the subsequent school year's admission round detailing school admission arrangements for all maintained schools in its area. This could be found within the Council’s Parental Guide to School Admissions that was available on the Council’s website, at local libraries and all schools in the Vale of Glamorgan. A hard copy was also available on request.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the Schools Admissions Policy for 2016/2017 attached at Appendix A to the report be approved in order that the admission arrangements could be implemented for the academic year 2016/2017.

 

(2) T H A T the use of article 13.09 of the Council's Constitution (urgent decision procedure) be authorised to approve the School Admissions Policy for 2016/17, in order that requirement to determine the policy by 15 April, 2015 was met.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) The Council was required to review its school admission policy arrangements annually and to determine the arrangements for 2016/17.

 

(2) To ensure that the requirement to determine the policy by 15 April, 2015 was met.

 

C2708  VISIBLE SERVICES – PROPOSED FEES AND CHARGES FOR 2015/2016 (VLS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) -

 

Approval was sought to increase service charges for functions managed by Visible Services for the financial year 2015 / 2016.

 

The Council delivered a number of chargeable services through the Directorate of Visible Services and Housing.  These charges were set on an annual basis.

 

The total savings required in Visible Services for 2015 / 2016 were circa £2m. In addition to this there was a budget saving of £340k from previous years to increase the roll out of car park charging. This would be the subject of a future Cabinet report. The department had a wide range of income sources that fed into its operational budgets and these included Welsh Government grants, income from external works, civil parking enforcement fines, lease income and a number of fees that were levied to the public and the commercial sector.  The projected total income for the department for 2015 / 2016 was £6.54m with approximately £910k of this income coming from the fees and charges detailed within the report. 

 

As part of the reshaping services programme, 'income generation' had been identified as a core work stream of the Council.  Each service area's income (from grants and customer receipts) had been subject to initial analysis and further work during 2015 / 2016 would identify where opportunities existed for income to be increased without a commensurate 'drop off' in service use.  It was proposed that this detail would be the subject of a future report to Cabinet.

 

The proposed charges for services were set out in the following appendices that were attached to the report:

 

Appendix 1 Waste Management and Cleansing

Appendix 2 Highways and Engineering

Appendix 3 Parks and Grounds Maintenance

Appendix 4 Porthkerry Cemetery

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Members for Adult Services, Visible and Leisure Services, and Housing, Building Maintenance and Community Safety left the room and took no part in any discussions that took place.

The Leader noted the following changes in relation to Appendix 3 as attached to the report: The section titled “Youth (U18/U17/U16/U15/U14/U13)” should be amended to “Youth (U18/U17)”, The next section titled “Youth (U12/11 – 9v9)” should be amended to “Junior (U12/U11 – 9v9)” followed by “Junior (U16/U15/U14/U13)”and finally the heading “Youth (U10/U9/U8/U7 – Mini football pitches)” should be changed to “Junior (U10/U9/U8/U7 – Mini football pitches)”.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the proposed Fees and Charges for Visible Services 2015/16 as set out in the report and at Appendices 1, 2, 3 (as amended), and 4 attached to the report be approved.

 

(2) T H A T the use of article 13.09 of the Council’s constitution (urgent decision procedure) be authorised to enable the Council to approve the charges in a timely manner.

 

(3) T H A T a further report be provided to Cabinet in 2015 / 2016 detailing the outcome to Visible Services of the reshaping services income generation workstream.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To demonstrate Cabinet's approval of the charge increases proposed for 2015 / 2016.

 

(2) In order to implement charges in a timely manner.

 

(3) To permit Cabinet to take a decision on charging strategies for functions provided by Visible Services in light of future budgetary challenges.  

 

C2709  ST PAUL’S CHURCH PENARTH (VLS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT) –

 

Cabinet was informed that the marketing for St Paul's Church had been completed in accordance with Cabinet Minute C2256.

 

At its meeting of 24 March, 2014 (Cabinet Minute C2256 refers), Cabinet resolved:

 "…(1) T H A T authority be granted to market an opportunity for the use of St Paul's Church, Penarth (delineated on a plan attached at Appendix A to the report) for community/recreational uses or as a mixed use scheme including community/recreational uses and other appropriate uses, subject to the relevant planning processes and the approval of the Director of Development Services in consultation with the Leader; Cabinet Member for Leisure, Parks, Culture and Sport Development, and Managing Director…”

In accordance with the above the Council’s external surveyors, Savills, had completed a comprehensive marketing campaign of the property.  The deadline for bids was 12 noon on 9 January, 2015.

 

The Project Board overseeing this marketing and disposal project comprised of the Leader of the Council, the Cabinet Member for Visible and Leisure Services, the Managing Director and Director of Development Services.

"St Paul's Shared Fitness Space CIC" had submitted a bid proposing a mixed use community space at the property.  A Community Interest Company or CIC was "…a new type of company for people who want to be involved in a business that benefits the community (the population as a whole or a specific group) rather than just the owners, managers or employees - a social enterprise" (Source: Community Interest Companies, the Key Facts, February 2008, Regulator of Community Interest Companies).

 

The bid from "St Paul's Shared Fitness Space CIC" was viewed positively, however it did not contain sufficient detailed business planning information required to ascertain whether it was a potentially viable proposition, therefore, additional information was required from the bidder.

 

Having considered the bid the Project Board was of the view that St Paul's Shared Space CIC" should offer a period of time (initially four months) to provide the following additional information:

 

(i) a revised Business Plan to demonstrate whether or not their scheme concept was a viable proposition;

(ii) written evidence of contact with other potential funding bodies to demonstrate whether or not they could potentially secure funding in addition to the Section 106 funding they had requested (if required); and

(iii) revised finalised outline scheme concept drawings together with more robust itemised cost estimates (from a Quantity Surveyor).

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for Regeneration commented that this scheme was in her ward, and that she was delighted that the Council had received a Community Interest proposal from the local community who proposed to use the facility as a shared fitness space. She further commented that it was positive that space for the boxing club had been included in the Community Interest proposal.

 

At the meeting the Leader commented that this interest had followed on from a Community Cabinet Meeting that had been held in Penarth where residents of Penarth were invited to come forward with proposals for the centre. He agreed with his Cabinet colleague how pleasing it was to see Community Interest Companies engage on this issue.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the completion of the marketing of St Paul's Church be noted.

 

(2) T H A T the Project Board offer a period of time for the bidder, "St Paul's Shared Fitness Space CIC", to provide further information about their bid as specified in the report.

 

(3) T H A T a further report be submitted at a later date to Cabinet, following the period of time offered to the bidder to provide additional information.  Thereafter the Project Board would recommend, subject to Cabinet approval, whether or not "St Paul's Shared Fitness Space CIC" was the Preferred Bidder subject to contract.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To note the completion of the marketing of St Paul's Church.

 

(2) To enable the Project Board to offer a period of time for "St Paul's Shared Fitness Space CIC" to provide additional information about their bid.

 

(3) To report the project Boards preferred bidder to Cabinet.

 

C2710  COWBRIDGE LIVESTOCK MARKET – VMAG MIXED USE MASTER PLAN (R) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) –

 

Cabinet was advised of the outcome of a due diligence exercise completed in accordance with Cabinet Minute C2129 in consideration of the Vale Market Action Group's (VMAG) mixed use Master Plan, the VMAG's proposed Market Hall and a proposal for a scaled down Livestock Market put forward by Glamorgan Marts;

 

“To seek authority from Cabinet to continue to support the principle of the VMAG mixed use Master Plan and to progress the project in accordance with the proposals outlined in this report to Cabinet”.

Cowbridge Livestock Market was located at the western end of Cowbridge town centre as identified in the Site Location Plan in Appendix A attached to the report.  The site comprised of two parts situated on either side of the publicly adopted highway called The Butts. 

 

• AREA A: the main Livestock Market site, extended approximately 0.87 hectares (2.12 acres); and

• AREA B: a strip of land to the east of the Butts alongside the historic town wall, which extended approximately 0.31 hectares (0.77 acres) and included non-operational bull pens, a sale ring and stock area, flanked either side by car parking.

 

In accordance with Cabinet Minute C2129, a due diligence exercise had been undertaken during 2014 by Officers reviewing the deliverability of the VMAG's indicative mixed use development concept.  This Officer review had been considered by the Project Board comprising the Leader; Cabinet Member for Regeneration, Managing Director and Director of Development Services.

As part of this due diligence exercise, Officers reported to the Project Board on the:

 

A) viability of the VMAG’s mixed used master plan;

B) viability of the older person's residential development, the proposed two public car parks and highway infrastructure;

C) viability of the VMAG’s “Market Hall” concept; and

D) viability of Glamorgan Marts’ proposed scaled down Livestock Market.

 

The VMAG's original master plan concept proposed that the site on both sides of The Butts be regenerated with the following mix of uses, which had been broken down into the following Zones as illustrated in Appendix C as attached to the report:

 

Zone A - Proposed Older Person's Residential Use;

Zone B - Proposed Live/Work Use;

Zone C - Proposed Market Hall;

Zone D1 - Proposed scaled down and refurbished Livestock Market;

Zone D2 - Proposed relocated Wash Down (part of scaled down Livestock Market);

Zone E1 - Proposed Public Car Park;

Zone E2 - Proposed Pedestrian Area;

Zone F1 - Proposed Public Car Park alongside Town Wall (alongside existing public car park areas at Zones F and F2).   

 

It was important to note that the Council would reserve the right to review its position regarding the future of the full Livestock Market site, the VMAG Master Plan, the Market Hall and the Livestock Market operation in the event that within a 12 month timeline from 1 April, 2015 one or more of the following had occurred:

 

• the Council’s marketing and disposal of Zones A and B was unsuccessful; and/or

• the capital and revenue funding for building and starting up the Market Hall was not secured by the VMAG and/or CIO; and/or;

• the Council and the VMAG and/or CIO did not agree a Lease for the Market Hall; and/or

• the Council and Glamorgan Marts did not agree a Lease for a scaled down Livestock Market.

 

After presenting this item, the Cabinet Member for Regeneration commented how pleased she was that these proposals were being developed by local communities, helping to empower the people of Cowbridge.

 

The Leader agreed with his Cabinet colleague by commenting that these developments were positive and that this was a real opportunity for the community to engage with the administration who were listening.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the continued support be agreed in principle of the Vale Market Action Group's (VMAG) mixed use Master Plan for the regeneration of the Livestock Market site, subject to any amendments required by the Council, planning/statutory consents and the Important Reservations identified in the report.

 

(2) T H A T the Managing Director be authorised, in consultation with the Leader, Cabinet Member for Regeneration and Director of Development Services, to market and dispose of Zones A and B (of Appendix C attached to the report) as one site for an older person's residential development opportunity with a requirement for the successful bidder to deliver at their own cost, on land to be retained by the Council, the two public car parks and associated highway infrastructure identified in the Vale Market Action Group's (VMAG) Mixed Use Master Plan, subject to the Important Reservations identified in the report.

 

(3) T H A T a deadline of 12 months be set from 1 April, 2015 for the Vale Market Action Group (VMAG) and/or Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO) referred to in the report to raise the capital and revenue funding required to construct and commence utilisation of the Market Hall in Zone C (of Appendix C attached to the report) respectively, subject to the Important Reservations identified in the report.

 

(4) T H A T the Managing Director be authorised, in consultation with the Leader, Cabinet Member for Regeneration and Director of Development Services, to negotiate and dispose by way of a lease the land at Zone C (of Appendix C attached to the report) for a Market Hall to the Vale Market Action Group (VMAG) and/or Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO) referred to in the report, subject to the Important Reservations identified in the report.

 

(5) T H A T an extension of the existing Licence of Glamorgan Marts be agreed for a period of 12 months from 1 April, 2015 for the full Livestock Market site.

 

(6) T H A T the Managing Director be authorised, in consultation with the Leader, Cabinet Member for Regeneration and Director of Development Services, to negotiate and dispose of by way of a lease the land at Zone D1 (of Appendix C attached to the report) to Glamorgan Marts for a scaled down Livestock Market operation, subject to the Important Reservations identified in the report.

 

(7) T H A T the Managing Director be authorised to agree terms to allow Glamorgan Marts to utilise land at Zones E1 and E2 on market days, subject to the Important Reservations identified in the report.

 

(8) T H A T the Managing Director be authorised to appoint external surveyors to assist with the marketing of Zones A and B, the lease negotiations for the Market Hall and Livestock Market and the appointment of other consultants as may be required to facilitate the wider regeneration of the Livestock Market site.

 

(9) T H A T the Head of Legal Services be authorised to prepare, execute and complete all legal documentation as may be required to facilitate the disposal of Zones A and B, the Market Hall and scaled down Livestock Market and use of Zones E1 and E2 referred to in the report.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To authorise the continued support in principle of the Vale Market Action Group's (VMAG) mixed use Master Plan.

 

(2) To authorise the marketing and disposal of Zones A and B (of Appendix C attached to the report).

 

(3) To authorise a 12 months deadline for the Vale Market Action Group (VMAG) and/or Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO) to raise the capital and revenue funding required for the Market Hall project.

 

(4) To authorise lease negotiations for the Market Hall land with the Vale Market Action Group (VMAG) and/or Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO) referred to in this report.

 

(5) To authorise a 12 months extension of the existing Licence of Glamorgan Marts.

 

(6) To authorise lease negotiations with Glamorgan Marts for a scaled down Livestock Market operation.

 

(7) To authorise the agreement of terms to allow Glamorgan Marts to utilise land at Zones E1 and E2 on market day.

 

(8) To authorise appointing external surveyors appointing other consultants as may be required to facilitate the wider regeneration of the Livestock Market site.

 

(9) To authorise the preparation, execution and completion of all legal documentation as may be required to facilitate the disposal of Zones A and B, the Market Hall and scaled down livestock market and use of Zones E1 and E2 referred to in this report.

 

C2711  DISABLED FACILITIES GRANTS PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR QUARTER 3 2014-15 (HBMCS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – SOCIAL CARE AND HEALTH, HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION, CORPORATE RESOURCES) - 

 

Cabinet was updated on the Council's performance in delivering Disabled Facilities Grants during quarter 3 of 2014-15 and on the progress made in relation to changes in processes that had been introduced recently.

 

The Council had a statutory duty to consider and approve applications for Disabled Facilities Grants (DFG). Disabled Facilities Grants funded the adaptation of privately owned homes to allow residents to live as independently as possible in their own home for as long as possible.

 

The Council had previously acknowledged its performance in delivering Disabled Facilities Grants had to be improved.  Despite further improvement in 2013/14, the Council remained in the bottom quartile of performance for local authorities in Wales. 

 

The Council’s performance of the DFG Service continued to improve during quarter 3 of 2014-15 and the average time to deliver a DFG had reduced to 201 days. 

 

A detailed breakdown of the DFG service performance at the end of quarter 3 was attached in the DFG Performance Review attached at Appendix 1 to the report.  Compared to the published DFG performance figures for 2013-14 for Welsh Authorities, this performance would have ranked the Council as being in 6th position in Wales. 

The improvement in Quarter 3 was in part due to the introduction of the framework contract, which reduced the delivery time in two stages: between the receipt of the Occupational Therapist recommendation and grant approval and between grant approval and the works completing on site.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the report on performance in delivering Disabled Facilities Grants during quarter 3 of 2014-15 be noted.

 

(2) T H A T the progress made on changes to processes to improve the delivery of Disabled Facilities Grants be noted.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To note the Council's performance delivering Disabled Facilities Grants during quarter 3 of 2014-15

 

(2) To note the progress made in improving the Council's delivery of Disabled Facilities Grants.

 

C2712  MOBILE HOMES (WALES) ACT 2013 (HBMCS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION) - 

 

Cabinet was apprised of the new Mobile Homes (Wales) Act 2013, to amend the officer delegation and to agree the fee structure to enable the Council to implement the Act.

 

On the 4 November, 2013, Welsh Government passed the Mobile Homes (Wales) Act 2013.  The Act introduced a new licensing, inspection and enforcement regime for residential mobile home sites in Wales with the Local Authority as the licensing authority for the Act.

 

All Mobile Homes sites had to be relicensed by the 1 April, 2015 under the Mobile Homes (Wales) Act 2013.  The Council, on consideration of an application for a Mobile Homes licence, may issue a licence with conditions.  It may also vary and revoke licences.  Licences may be issued for up to 5 years.  Once a licence was issued, the Council must inspect the site at least once in the licensed period to ensure compliance and could issue a fixed penalty notice or a compliance notice if a condition of the licence was breached.  Site owners had a right to appeal to the Residential Property Tribunal if they disagreed with conditions set against the licence or compliance notice.

 

When considering an application for a licence, the Council must consider if the owner or manager of the site was a fit and proper person.  The Council must also ensure that physical standards of the site were suitable for the health, safety and wellbeing of the residents and may set conditions relating to the physical conditions or management of the site.

 

The Council was able to charge a fee for processing a licence application or an application to vary a licence.  Before fees could be charged, the Act required the Council to prepare and publish a fees policy that must be subject to consultation.  Working with a local authority implementation group, Welsh Government had developed a toolkit to assist Councils to set a fee structure that was clear, transparent and was consistent across Wales to reduce the risk of challenge.  This toolkit had been used to identify the costs of providing the service which were detailed within Appendix 1 attached to the report.

 

In line with legal requirements, all owners of Mobile Home Sites in the Vale of Glamorgan were consulted on the proposed structure. This consultation process concluded in November 2014 and no objections to the fees were received.

 

The Act also enabled the Council to charge for enforcement work where a Compliance Notice was served.  Where a Compliance Notice was served, the Council would charge to recover its costs for the drafting and service of the Notice.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the Director of Development Services and Head of Public Protection authorise Council Officers to issue, vary and revoke licences under the provisions of the Mobile Homes (Wales) Act 2013.

 

(2) T H A T the Director of Development Services and Head of Public Protection authorise Council Officers to carry out the Council's function under the Mobile Homes (Wales) Act 2013.

 

(3) T H A T the fees to process Mobile Home licences, as detailed in Appendix 1 attached to the report, be agreed.

 

(4) T H A T resolutions 1 and 2 above be referred to Council for consideration and approval.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To amend the Council's Scheme of Officer Delegation to enable the Council to issue, vary and revoke Mobile Homes Site licences under the Mobile Homes (Wales) Act 2013.

 

(2) To amend the Council's Scheme of Officer Delegation to enable the Council to authorise staff to enforce the Mobile Homes (Wales) Act 2013.

 

(3) To enable the service to charge an appropriate fee to recover the cost of implementing the Mobile Homes licensing service.

 

(4) To allow variations to the Council's scheme of delegations.

 

C2713  HOME IMPROVEMENT LOAN FUNDING (HBMCS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION) -  

 

Cabinet was asked to consider a repayable funding opportunity from Welsh Government that would enable the Vale of Glamorgan Council to offer loans to repair private sector housing.

 

On 29 January, 2015, Welsh Government announced a £10 million Home Improvement Loan Scheme.  This Scheme constituted repayable funding, to enable local authorities to develop loan schemes to support private sector homeowners improve poor quality housing.

 

The funding from Welsh Government to the Vale of Glamorgan Council for a Home Improvement Loan fund amounted to £844,229, to be claimed in full by 31 March, 2016.  This funding must be repaid to the Welsh Government by 31 March, 2030. Welsh Government would not charge interest on the repayable Loan Fund. 

 

The scheme was not a statutory duty for the Council but the funding would support the Council's Empty Property Strategy, Private Sector Housing Renewal Strategy and Housing Improvement programmes, both through its Regeneration and Welsh Housing Quality Programmes.  Unlike the recent funding from Welsh Government for houses into homes loans, Welsh Government was not specifying the terms and conditions of the loan products.

To enable the Council to meet its strategic housing need and ensure that any products offered were competitive with high street lenders the following products would be offered.

 

• Home Repair Loan - A loan targeted to owner occupiers to assist in essential repairs. 

• Landlord Loan - A loan for landlords who would offer accommodation to support the Council meet its homelessness responsibilities.

• Leaseholder Loan - A loan for leaseholders within Council owned blocks of flats to assist in meeting the cost of essential repairs or upgrading the buildings to achieve better energy efficiency.

• Empty Property Loan - A loan targeted to owners of empty properties who wished to occupy the empty property following renovation, to assist in basic renovations.

 

To ensure the funding was secured, the loan would need to be registered with the Land Registry as a charge against the property.  All loans offered to private sector owners must be repaid in full. The loan would be interest free but the local authority would charge an administration fee of 15% on each loan awarded, to cover the administration cost of the scheme.  To enable the Council to offer the above loan products, the terms and conditions of this financial assistance must be detailed within the Council's Private Sector Housing Renewal Policy 2014.  Appendix 1 attached to the report detailed the amendment to the Policy.

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for Housing, Building Maintenance and Community Safety highlighted Paragraph 2 of the report, noting that the £10 million funding from Welsh Government was being shared across the whole of Wales.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T sections 7.4 and 8.2 of the Private Sector Housing Renewal Policy 2014 be amended to include the provision of Home Improvement Loans as detailed in Appendix 1 attached to the report.

 

(2) T H A T the use of article 13.09 of the Council’s constitution (urgent decision procedure) be authorised to enable the Council to draw down home improvement load funding by the 31 March, 2015.

 

(3) T H A T delegated authority be given to the Director of Development Services, in consultation with the Cabinet Member for Housing, Building Maintenance and Community Safety to adopt a suitable delivery option to administer the load products specified.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To enable the Council to offer Home Improvement Loans to private sector housing owners.

 

(2&3) To enable officers to consider and appraise the delivery options available to administer a loan scheme within the revenue funding available.

 

C2714  PUBLIC PROTECTION – PROPOSED FEES AND CHARGES 2015/16 (HBMCS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION) –

 

Approval was sought for increases in fees and charges in respect of those functions managed by Public Protection.

 

It was proposed that the fees set by the Local Authority for Public Protection Services be increased in line with budgetary inflation increases of 2%.  The charges were set out in Appendix 1 attached to the report.   

 

The charges for the Council's Pest Control service needed to cover the cost of the service and had to be competitive within the market to ensure the service was used and that income was achieved.  Pest Control fees had been increased to reflect these conflicting demands, and were set out in Appendix 2 attached to the report.

 

Trading Standards charges under the Weights and Measures Act 1985 were set regionally and had been increased by 1.2% in line with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) in September 2014. The fees were set out in Appendix 3 attached to the report.

 

The Council issued Ship Sanitation Certificates upon request.  There was a standard charging policy across the UK for the cost of these certificates, agreed by the Association of Port Health Authorities (APHA). From 1 January, 2008, APHA recommended that UK local/port health authorities adopted the charges agreed by the APHA Executive Board.  The Board had recommended the adoption of new fees from 1 April, 2015, as detailed in Appendix 4 attached to the report, which represented a 1.5% increase on 2014 charges.

 

The fee for the Council's Renewal Area Agency service would increase from 12% to 15% to reflect the increase in costs of delivering the service provided.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the schedule of fees and charges as set out in Appendices 1 to 4 attached to the report be approved to become effective from 1 April, 2015.

 

(2) T H A T the use of article 13.09 of the Council's Constitution (urgent decision procedure) be authorised to enable the increases in fees and charges to be implemented from 1 April, 2015.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To ensure fees were increased in line with inflation and statutory requirements and reflect more accurately the actual cost of providing services.

 

(2) In order to implement charges in a timely manner.

 

C2715  SUPPORTING PEOPLE CONTRACT (HBMCS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION) -  

 

Cabinet was updated on the outcome of a tendering process undertaken for a new   support service for clients with mental health issues and approval was sought to enter into a new Contract for the provision of the service.

 

The Supporting People Programme was the policy and funding framework for delivering housing related support to vulnerable people in different types of accommodation and across all tenures.

 

In accordance with Welsh Government Guidance for Supporting People, all local authorities were required to develop a three year Local Commissioning Plan each year and to include a list of future service priorities which were determined following an analysis of the client need data collected.

 

The Local Commissioning Plan 2014 to 2017 approved by Cabinet on 13 January, 2014 (Cabinet Minute C2159) evidenced the need to develop a new support service for clients with mental health issues, to be delivered in conjunction with the Community Mental Health Team which would provide assistance with medication and ensure that clients remained stable in the community.

 

A tendering exercise for this new service was undertaken in accordance with the Supporting People Commissioning Framework Agreement approved by Cabinet on 6 July, 2011 (Cabinet Minute C1364). This required the Council to issue an invitation to tender to the top three scoring support providers for this service user group. The three support providers in this instance (Hafod Care, Llamau and Solas) all submitted tenders for the service.

 

As the three support providers had already met the Council's service and organisational requirements and were part of the Commissioning Framework the scoring was set at 60% for price and 40% for quality.

 

The Tender Panel consisted of the Strategy and Supporting People Manager, Housing Strategy Officer, Operational Manager Mental Health Vale of Glamorgan and Cardiff Councils and the Mental Health Housing Officer for the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the outcome of the Supporting People tender be noted and dealt with under the Part II item later on in the agenda.

 

Reason for decision

 

To enable a new and much needed housing related support service for vulnerable services users to start.

 

C2716  MATTERS WHICH THE CHAIRMAN HAD DECIDED WERE URGENT

 

RESOLVED - T H A T the following matters, which the Chairman had decided were urgent for the reason given beneath the minute headings be considered.

 

C2717  REVIEW OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES IN THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN (REF) -

 

Matter which the Chairman had decided was urgent by virtue of the need to implement the proposals as contained within the report

 

The Scrutiny Committee (Lifelong Learning) on the 16 March, 2015 considered the above report of the Cabinet Member for Adult Services.

 

Prior to the presentation of the report by the Head of Service the Chairman advised that supplementary information which had been emailed to Members of the Committee and that was tabled at the meeting consisted of a reference from the Cabinet meeting on 9th March 2015 and included copies of an amended Appendix D to the report together with a copy of a letter from Councillor H.J.W. James relating to Rhoose Library.

 

In presenting the report the Head of Strategy, Community Learning and Resources informed Members that at its meeting on 9th March Cabinet had considered the outcome of consultation on proposals arising from the Library Strategy and had referred the report to the Scrutiny Committee for its consideration. In referring to the background, the Head of Service stated that on 11th August 2014 Cabinet had at that time considered a number of recommendations, eleven of which had been approved with subsequent approval to consult being agreed on a further three, more significant proposed changes to library services:

 

• The development of community led libraries in St. Athan, Dinas Powys, Sully, Wenvoe and Rhoose.

• Reduced library opening hours in Barry, Penarth, Cowbridge and Llantwit Major

• Relocating library services in St. Athan.

 

The consultation which had focused on these three proposed changes had begun on 13th October 2014 and had closed on 31st December 2014.  To ensure that stakeholders had had access to all of the information required to make informed comments on the strategy a comprehensive consultation document had been produced which was attached at Appendix A to the report.  That document set out the findings of the Library Review, the rationale for the proposed changes and also offered information on how the Council believed these could be implemented.  To further support the consultation a series of drop in sessions had been hosted at each of the Vale’s libraries, which had been designed to help promote the consultation and offer residents the opportunity to discuss the strategy and consultation process with senior officers from the Learning and Skills Directorate.  The full analysis of the consultation results was included at Appendix B to the report. 

 

Responses to Part 1 of the consultation, the introduction of community led libraries, had demonstrated that the views of residents varied greatly across the Vale, which suggested that the viability of community libraries would also vary between communities.  The results had suggested that community led facilities would be viable in Dinas Powys, St. Athan and Wenvoe but such a facility would not receive significant support in Sully and would not be welcomed in Rhoose. 

 

Of the 26 survey respondents that regularly used Sully library, only 8 had answered that they would support the establishment of a community library in their area.  However, an encouraging degree of support had been shown from members of the Community Council and the Save Sully Campaign Group for the development of a community led library.  Senior officers from the Learning and Skills Directorate had been invited to attend meetings with representatives of both groups during the consultation period to discuss that proposal and to explore how it could be supported by the community.  Further contact had also been received indicating interest in progressing discussions and exploring opportunities for improving the use of the library through it becoming a community led facility.

 

There had been more responses from regular users of Rhoose than any other facility in the Vale and of the 164 survey respondents that regularly used Rhoose Library, 87% had answered that they would not support the establishment of a community led library in their area.  This had also been reinforced by the views shared by those that had attended the drop in session and the public meeting that had been held in Rhoose.  Although the consultation document had made it clear that the status quo was not an option, the users of Rhoose library were clear that the status quo should be maintained, particularly as Rhoose in their opinion received fewer Council services than other areas and in light of the growing population.

 

It was evident from the responses received that the residents of Rhoose had a great deal of passion for their local library which had been reinforced by the turn out and comments made at the drop in session and at a public meeting they had  organised and which Council officers had attended on 15th December 2014.  This passion suggested that there could be capacity to sustain the library as a community led facility with the support of the Council.  Given that the status quo was not an option and the alternative for the libraries at Dinas Powys, Rhoose, Wenvoe, St. Athan and Sully was closure, it was advised that all five communities be offered the opportunity to make a successful transition to a community led library. The Head of Service referred to a timetable to progress the implementation of such a proposal as contained within the report and that formal Expressions of Interest should be submitted by 18th May 2015.

 

The Head of Service commented that a range of support and advice may be required by community groups to enable them  to develop robust business cases and that this would be provided or commissioned by the Council for any community group requesting such support.

 

The second part of the consultation had proposed changes to library opening hours.  Respondents had been asked to select one of four options and were also offered the opportunity to suggest any other ways that they considered library opening hours could be reduced.  An analysis of the consultation responses had shown a clear preference for reduced opening hours that provided varied opening and closing times to allow for at least one late evening a week at all libraries.

 

The proposals showed an overall reduction of 41 hours achieved by adjusting the opening and closing times each day for each of the town libraries, whilst maintaining one late evening at each library.  In order to meet the savings target for 2015/16, the report had proposed that the revised opening hours be implemented from 1st June 2015. 

 

Responses to the third part of the consultation about the relocation of St. Athan Library had been inconclusive, 50% of respondents had stated that they supported relocation with a number of respondents making suggestions about alternative locations but there was no consensus of opinion about an alternative location.  It was proposed that future consideration of the location of the library in St. Athan be tied in with discussions with any groups expressing an interest in running a community led library in the area.

 

Following the presentation of the report, the Chairman advised that he had allowed between 3-5 minutes each for public speakers to make representations to the Committee and that he had invited Trade Union representatives to attend to speak on behalf of staff on service generic issues. Due to the fact that members of staff potentially affected by the proposals had a direct personal interest in the issues the Monitoring officer’s advice was that it would be inappropriate for staff to speak at the meeting, however, they could attend the meeting to hear the debate.  The Scrutiny Committee also had no role in considering staffing related issues as a separate process existed. 

 

The first speaker who had requested permission to speak was then invited to present to the Committee.

 

Mr. Riley from the Save Rhoose Library Campaign commenced by advising that in the Campaign’s view the Library Service Review that had been undertaken had been flawed and a biased survey had taken place.  He stated that some time ago following the earlier consultation process, views about the involvement of volunteers to enhance the library service had been sought and there had been no issues for staff at that time, but the current review now sought volunteers to undertake the library service with staff then being left unemployed.  In his view the strategy had not considered the users, the key question in the survey had been “would you be prepared to run a community library” and in his view, in asking this question, he suggested that it had been a “loaded” question.  He stated that it was apparent that town library constituents also had different views to community library residents and by publishing the list of affected libraries, it had predetermined the results of the survey and had therefore been a major flaw in the process.  In referring to proposals for community led libraries he advised that there was no evidence that they would be viable in the Vale.  The campaign’s view was that the options for Rhoose were either closure or community led, however, he stated that closing the Rhoose facility would mean that another facility was lost to the Rhoose population.  He referred to a recent Planning meeting, where a planning application for over 700 homes had been approved which he considered could result  in over 10,000 people being resident in the area and that it was more facilities that would be required for such a population not a   decrease.  Mr. Riley urged the Scrutiny Committee to reject the Strategy and request that a further review be undertaken with the suggestion that back office services be reviewed for efficiency savings as opposed to front line services.  In conclusion Mr. Riley thanked the Scrutiny Committee for the opportunity to speak at the meeting.

 

Mr. Rowan Hughes, representing the Unison Union, commenced by stating that he was speaking on behalf of Unison Union Library staff.  The proposals, he suggested, were the largest cuts to library services that had ever been seen within the Vale and that the staff had major concerns about the cuts in hours.  He stressed that the Union was not stating that there was no place for volunteers but that the Union’s view was that they should not replace staff.  The report acknowledged that the status quo was not an option and that viable alternatives should be considered.  Mr. Hughes questioned the research that had been undertaken and referred to a report that had been commissioned by the Welsh Government, namely Independent Trust and Community Libraries in Wales.  In referring to the executive summary for that document, he stated that the Welsh Government’s view was that there had been various models developed but the only model for sustainability and viability was the model which had a close working relationship with Local Authorities and was referred to as Model C, that model he stated had also incorporated 15 hours of paid staff time.  He urged the Committee to consider Model C but that if they did not accept the model, he suggested that they look at other models and referred to the example in Conwy where libraries had used existing staff from other branches.

 

The Chairman took the opportunity to thank the speakers for their attendance and asked Elected Members (not Members of the Committee) to come forward. Councillor P. Clarke, having been granted permission to speak, stated that he considered that it was grossly unfair that Rhoose had been categorised as a rural village library.  In his view there was currently a population of over 7,000 in the area and a further 800 homes or more had been approved at the recent Planning Committee which could equate to approximately 2,000 more residents.  To this end he stated that with this increase Rhoose should not have decreases in facilities but increases.  He stated that on the basis of logistics, Rhoose should be provided with more facilities and that it was the general feeling in the area that Rhoose had been short changed over the years.  He referred to the number of people who frequented the library, in particular those who needed to complete job applications in order to seek Job Seekers Allowance and the number of pupils who utilised the library.  In referring to the consultation process he advised that he had been informed by some members of the public that at the time when officers had interviewed members of the public, not many notes had been taken and the feeling had been given that the decision for closure had already been made.

 

Councillor Dr. I.J. Johnson, with permission to speak, advised that he was present to defend the library service as a whole, but that he wished to see the data in relation to the libraries, particularly in the context of evening opening hours.  In referring to community libraries he stated that the review had been poorly handled in this regard and that any decision needed to be based on where the service was now and not looking to the future.  In his view the Council did not know at this stage if the service would be viable or not.  He also stated that the Review of Libraries should have been part of the Reshaping Services Agenda and that it should not have been separate to it.  He raised a number of questions in relation to what would happen if there were not enough volunteers and he thought the Council was pitting communities against each other. He further queried the charges in libraries, whether the income had increased, how many “friends groups” had been set up and what the profile of the Review was. The report also suggested security cuts to the building and he queried how they would affect the safety of the staff and the building.  He further stated that pop up libraries had been considered in the previous review but that these had not now been considered in the current process.  He queried why and referred to a pop up library that had been established by Barry Town Council. 

 

Councillor H.J.W. James, with permission to speak, had also submitted representations to the Cabinet for its meeting on 9th March which had been tabled at the meeting.  Copies of the agenda and the tabled information had also been made available to guest speakers and for the public.  Councillor James, in his presentation, referred to the increasing population of Rhoose and that it had grown steadily over the past 30 years but that over that period the library had continued to be identified as a small rural library.  Since the installation of computers for the public, the use of the library by a number of older people and children had increased dramatically.  The Rhoose School also supported the library and pupils gained access to the school building without going outside on the road or the pavement via the library.  The Rhoose School had also objected to the proposed down grading of the library from professional staff to a volunteer run service.  In his view, Rhoose was large enough to be treated as a town and in his view Dinas Powys should be treated similarly.  He queried why the Rhoose Library had been deemed appropriate to be run by a community led group as in the first instance it did not have a Community Council.  He agreed that in other areas in the Vale some Community Councils may be able to develop such facilities but that it was not the case for Rhoose.  He referred to the limited facilities in Rhoose, i.e. the school, a youth club and the one extra football pitch that had been made available.  In his view Rhoose was growing fast but the services were being withdrawn.  The Council had a duty to consider the views of the population of the residents in the Vale rather than reducing all of the facilities and only keeping the three libraries in the three towns.  In his view Rhoose was different to any other community in the Vale that had been affected by the closures, he referred to a number of other organisations who were actually setting up services within the area, he referred to Tesco’s and the Post Office who had recently advised that they were going to make Rhoose a priority.  Rhoose was no longer small, it was being developed and the population was ever increasing.  It was his view that the Scrutiny Committee should ask the Cabinet to rethink the proposals in relation to Rhoose and Dinas Powys in view of the comments made at the meeting. 

 

Councillor C.P. Franks, with permission to speak, stated that he had received dispensation from the Standards Committee to speak and vote on issues in relation to the Reshaping Services Agenda, and advised that he had profound concerns with regard to the Library Review since the process had commenced.  He had not been convinced that the consultation had been robust and he questioned the use of volunteers and he asked the Committee to undertake a further review of the service as he was not convinced that 40 to 50 volunteers could be found.  He had also expected the Vale to provide information in relation to what financial contributions it would make to the process, but no information had been provided.  With regard to Dinas Powys, the library there had significant maintenance issues and in order to maintain the building there would have to be a significant increase in Council Tax and the local precept. 

 

In considering the report and the evidence that had been presented, the Member on the Committee for Sully advised that the Community Council for Sully and the Save Sully Campaign Group had undertaken further public consultation with residents. They had felt that the responses to the consultation that had been undertaken by the Council had not been representative of the population.  Their consultation had, however, shown through the statistics that there was a very low usage of the library in Sully, the footfall was low and it was situated in the wrong location.  Officers had been invited to a meeting to discuss their suggested proposals and to explore how Sully library could be supported by the community.  The Community Council had chosen to make an expression of interest in order to continue to provide a service through a community led facility rather than see the facility diminish completely.  The Member suggested that other Communities should consider undertaking a similar analysis and exercise in order to ascertain to the views of the locality in a similar way to the one that had been undertaken in Sully. 

 

A Member queried whether the Model C suggestion referred to in the Welsh Government documentation raised by the Unison representative had been considered in the process.  The Head of Service advised that the Welsh Government document had not been published until very recently.  However, since publication, she could advise that Model C appeared to be very similar to what the Vale Council had proposed in the report.  The major difference she stated was that Model C referred to 15 hours staffed time whilst the Vale’s model proposed a peripatetic librarian support.  If necessary support from a peripatetic community librarian could be considered to be increased.  The Department had also advised Welsh Government that the current staffed hours of some of its libraries were lower than those currently being considered by Welsh Government Representations had therefore been made to Welsh Government on this aspect and they had responded that they would take it into consideration.  In referring to the concept of community led libraries, the Head of Service advised that this was a new concept in Wales but it had been established in England for some time.  The Welsh Government research had only focused on Wales.

 

The Chairman, in referring to the statistics, stated that the footfall statistics were essential in the process with the Head of Service advising that all the data had been made available during the consultation period and had been part of the initial proposals.  In response to the query regarding comparisons with the communities of Rhoose and Cowbridge, the Head of Service stated that visitor numbers and issues for Cowbridge were far greater than those for Rhoose, in fact she referred to them being three to four times higher than those for Rhoose. 

 

Following a query from a Member in referring to one of the representations that the consultation process had been unfair and flawed, the Head of Service advised that advice had been sought from professionals within the Council including the Council’s’ Communication and Consultation Officer and the Head of Legal Services.  It was important that the consultation document was clear with regard to the exact proposal and that there was case law which supported this approach.  The principles of good consultation and engagement had been taken into account.   

 

A Member, in response to the issue of a lack of facilities in Rhoose, referred to the recent approval of a planning application in the Rhoose area, and the impact of a S106 agreement which is made with the developer.  The funds received would be utilised for the community to support a number of facilities and advised that Local Members would be consulted on where that money should be spent and allocated.  He also stated that this route would also be available for applications / developments in Dinas Powys and was an opportunity for Elected Members to put forward suggestions at the time to detail what facilities they would be looking for in those areas.

 

Prior to a vote being taken, the Chairman advised all present that only Members of the Committee, could vote on the issue as although there were co-opted Members on the Committee, under the legislation they could only vote on Education matters and the library service was not classed as such.

 

Having fully considered the report and the representations presented, it was moved by the Chairman that the proposed recommendations contained within the report, which included the proposed closure of Rhoose and Dinas Powys libraries (should expressions of interest not be received in developing a community led library) be amended to read that both Rhoose and Dinas Powys libraries be removed from the proposals. However, having put the matter to a vote, the proposed amendment was lost and it was subsequently

 

RECOMMENDED – T H A T the resolutions of Cabinet be accepted, and the representations as provided within the minutes be forwarded to Cabinet for consideration.

 

Reason for recommendation

 

Having regard to the evidence presented and the comments made at the meeting.”

 

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Cabinet having considered the recommendations of the Scrutiny Committee (Lifelong Learning)

 

RESOLVED – T H A T the contents of the report be noted.

 

Reason for decision

 

To note the contents of the report.

 

C2718  ARMED FORCES COMMUNITY COVENANT GRANT (L) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – CORPORATE RESOURCES) -

 

Matter which the Chairman had decided was urgent by reason of the need to enable the grant terms and conditions to be accepted by the Council

 

Approval was sought to accept an Armed Forces Community Covenant grant related to the Pavilion Bridge Project, based at Penarth Pier.

 

On the 23 June, 2011, the Council launched a Community Covenant.  The aims of the Community Covenant were to:

 

• Encourage local communities to support the Armed Forces Community in their areas.

• Nurture public understanding and awareness amongst the public of issues affecting the Armed Forces Community.

• Recognise and remember the sacrifices faced by the Armed Forces Community.

• Encourage activities which helped to integrate the Armed Forces Community into local life.

• Encourage the Armed Forces Community to help and support the wider community whether through participation in events and joint projects, or other forms of engagement.

 

Part of this covenant included access to the Armed Forces Covenant Grant scheme.  The grant scheme was administered by the Ministry of Defence (MoD) on behalf of Her Majesty's Government. The aim of the Community Covenant Grant Scheme was to financially support projects at the local level, which strengthened the ties or the mutual understanding between members of the Armed Forces Community and the wider community in which they lived.

 

On 29 February, 2012 (minute number C1645) Cabinet noted the Armed Forces Community Covenant Scheme and approved delegated power for grant applications under the scheme below the value of £15,000.

 

A grant application had been received from Penarth Arts and Crafts Ltd for the Pavilion Bridge Project. The original value of the application was £191,866.  As this was the last round of bidding under the current scheme, the format changing post-April 2015, the Council was requested to confirm what could be delivered with a reduced level of grant funding i.e. 25% and 50%.

 

Grant approval had been received from the Community Covenant Grant Scheme Board for the reduced grant value of £47,600.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the terms and condition of the Armed Forces Community Covenant grant, totalling £47,600, relating to the Pavilion Bridge Project, based at Penarth Pier, be accepted.

 

(2) T H A T the Council entered into a Deed of Grant with Penarth Arts and Crafts Ltd.

 

Reasons for Decisions

 

(1) To accept the grant.

 

(2) To enter into the necessary legal agreement.

 

C2719  EXCLUSION OF PRESS AND PUBLIC -

 

RESOLVED - T H A T under Section 100A(4) of the Local Government Act 1972, the press and public be excluded from the meeting for the following item of business on the grounds that it involves the likely disclosure of exempt information as defined in Part 4 of Schedule 12A (as amended) of the Act, the relevant paragraphs of the Schedule being referred to in brackets after the minute heading.

 

C2720  SUPPORTING PEOPLE CONTRACT (HBMCS) (EXEMPT INFORMATION – PARAGRAPH 14) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION) -

 

Cabinet was updated on the outcome of a tendering process undertaken for a new   support service for clients with mental health issues and approval was sought to enter into a new Contract for the provision of the service.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1) T H A T the outcome of the Supporting People tender be noted.

 

(2) T H A T the Council enter into a new three year contract with Solas, with the option to extend for a further two years with Solas and that the Head of Legal Services be authorised to agree the terms of the said Contract and to execute the same.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1) To note the supporting people tender.

 

(2) To enable a new and much needed housing related support service for vulnerable services users to start.

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