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SCRUTINY COMMITTEE (ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT)

 

Minutes of a meeting held on 2nd September, 2014.

 

Present:  Councillor Mrs. A.J. Moore (Chairman); Councillors G.A. Cox, Mrs. P. Drake, Mrs. M. Kelly Owen, P.G. King, A.G. Powell, G. Roberts and S.T. Wiliam.

 

 

327     APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE –

 

These were received from Councillors E. Hacker (Vice-Chairman) and P.J. Clarke.

 

 

328     MINUTES –  

 

RECOMMENDED – T H A T the minutes of the meeting held on 15th July, 2014 be approved as a correct record.

 

 

329     DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST –

 

No declarations were received.

 

 

330     REVENUE AND CAPITAL MONITORING FOR THE PERIOD 1ST APRIL TO 31ST JULY 2014 (DDS AND DVSH) –

 

The Committee was updated in respect of the position of revenue and capital expenditure for the period 1st April to 31st July 2014. 

 

Revenue

 

The Revenue Budget and projected outturn for 2014/15 was shown in the table below.  It was currently projected that services under this Committee would outturn within target at year end, however this was after the use of reserves.

 

Economy & Environment 

Revenue Budget

 

Probable Outturn

Variance

(+ ) Favourable

(-) Adverse

 

£000

£000

£000

Highways Maintenance & Engineering

 

8,536

9,236

(700)

Waste Management

 

9,376

9,376

0

Grounds Maintenance

 

3,528

3,528

0

Support

 

0

0

0

Building Services

 

0

0

0

Economic Development

 

832

832

0

Leisure

 

3,515

3,515

0

Planning and Transportation

 

5,306

5,306

0

Use of Reserves/ Other Identified Savings

0

(700)

700

 

 

 

 

Total Economy & Environment

31,093

31,093

 

0

 

Within Highways Maintenance and Engineering Design and Procurement, Members were asked to note that an amount of £700k had been used from Reserves in order to cover the budget shortfall. Following this there was currently an adverse variance of £77k to the profiled budget.  The original budget for 2014/15 took account of the £165k savings required for this financial year.  Progress against these savings was shown in Appendix 4.  There were also financial savings from previous years that had not yet been made and were putting pressure on the budget.  These savings still to be made related to street lighting (£150k) and car parking (£340k).  Reports would shortly be brought before Cabinet, by the Director of Visible Services and Housing, to set out the proposals for both of these savings.  Full year savings would not be made in these areas and due to their size it was proposed that the Visible Services Reserve was used to fund the shortfall.

 

Waste Management – There was currently an adverse variance of £41k.  There were two main reasons for the current overspend.  Firstly, the bulk of the savings in waste management for this financial year related to the more efficient use of the vehicle fleet.  Due to a slight delay in the implementation of the vehicle telemetry software, some of the proposed savings had slipped by a few months.  However, this was now in place and reports would shortly be run on vehicle utility so that decisions can be taken on vehicles that were under-utilised thus enabling savings to be made.  Secondly, there had been an increase in the cost of the treatment of dry co-mingled recycling due to a new contract being in place from April 2014.  Although there was currently an adverse variance to the budget, the interim contract with Viridor for disposal of black bag waste would achieve significant savings compared to the current cost of disposal.  The Vale were due to join this contract in November 2014. This should ensure a balanced year end budget.  The original budget for 2014/15 took account of the £1,020k savings required for this financial year which were shown in Appendix 4.  The budget would be monitored closely to ensure that efficiency savings that were not made were found elsewhere within the budget.

 

Grounds Maintenance – There was currently an adverse variance of £50k to the profiled budget.  Again, there had been some slippage in the savings relating to transport, however, every effort would be made to ensure that savings were made elsewhere in the department.  The original budget for 2014/15 took account of the £40k savings required for this financial year detailed in Appendix 4.  The budget would be monitored closely to ensure these efficiency savings were achieved.

 

Economic Development – There was currently a favourable variance of £18k to profiled budget.  This was due mainly to higher than anticipated income in the Employment Training Services section although pre-established changes in terms of the JobFit agreement meant that attachment payments were likely to reduce from August 2014 and so the surplus was likely to diminish.  The budget was currently expected to outturn on target.

 

Leisure – There was currently a favourable variance of £35k to profiled budget.  This was due mainly to vacant posts within the Countryside division being held pending a restructure within the Division.  However, as it was still early in the financial year the budget was currently expected to outturn on target.

 

Planning and Transportation – There was currently a favourable variance of £122k to profiled budget.  This was due mainly to a higher than anticipated level of fee income received to date.  Some additional staffing may be needed to assist with the additional workload within the division and therefore at this stage the budget was still projected to outturn on target.  The need for staffing and the manner in which this need could be catered for was currently being addressed.

 

Capital

 

Detailed within Appendix 2 to the report was the financial progress in respect of the Capital Programme as at 31st July 2014.  Members were advised that the use of Emergency Powers had been approved in respect of Section 106 schemes related to The Herberts and a 20mph Zone  in Llandough.

 

Shown under Appendix 3 was non-financial information relating to capital construction schemes with a budget of over £100k.  Where the budget shown in Appendix 2 was more than £100k but was made up of several schemes that individually were less than £100k, the scheme was not included in Appendix 3. 

 

A Committee Member, in referring to the £700k overspend identified within Highway Maintenance and Engineering, queried as to why the full makeup of the overspend was not detailed within the covering report or appendices.  In reply Members were informed that, in short, the £700k overspend was made up of £150k from street lighting, a further £340k from car parking, £60,000 from coastal car parking and an amount of £150k relating to the repair of potholes.  The money identified to be set aside for potholes was based on previous year’s outturn and, as such, was an estimate and may vary.  In relation to this a Committee Member commented that this information needed to be clearly shown within the report and that Members needed to be provided with a thorough and proper explanation of any large overspends.

 

Further to this point the Director of Visible Services and Housing advised Members that within Visible Services there had not been an overspend since 2002, when the service generates any income this money is allocated directly to the Council’s provision.  He alluded to the decrease of the financial settlement provided to the Vale of Glamorgan Council by the Welsh Government.  He went on to inform the Committee that a report detailing changes to car parking charges would be presented initially to Cabinet and then on to the Scrutiny Committee over the next few months and this report would detail how the service would break even by the year end.  He also asked Members to note the level of potential savings following the introduction of the vehicle tracking system that had been fitted to 95% of all Council vehicles.  Members were also asked to note the potential to save £100k per year as a result of the Vans Home to Work initiative. 

 

In relation to the car parking and street lighting report previously alluded to by the Director of Visible Services and Housing, a Committee Member commented that if the report was received by Cabinet in December and following further consultation with the Scrutiny Committee, there would only likely be a period of two to three months in which savings in relation to car parking could be achieved.  The Director of Visible Services and Housing stated subject to approval, implementation should be around January 2015 and that an amount of £50k had been outlaid within the budget in order to purchase the necessary hardware to cover the cost of new car parking charge machines.  However this did not cover all car parks in the Vale and that the payback time for the investment would be around one to two years. 

 

A Committee Member, referring to the potential use of wind / solar energy to power street lighting, queried as to whether this had been looked into.  In response the Committee was advised that the Council had looked into this in principle.  However, solar power only worked on bright sunny days and was not a consistent form of energy generation.  The Council’s current strategy was to install LED light bulbs within street lights and some Authorities had been able to achieve a 40% saving as a result.  Many other Local Authorities had also introduced a central management system in order to identify and manage lighting in areas where the demand varied.  The main problem of this however was that the initial investment was very expensive and that the introducing of a central management system was outside of the current budget set within the Vale of Glamorgan.  In time there would be a move to full LED lighting in the future and this had the potential to save between £300k to £400k per year and that could help to protect other services. 

 

Having considered the report it was subsequently

 

RECOMMENDED – T H A T the position with regard to the 2014/15 revenue and capital monitoring be noted.

 

Reason for recommendation

 

That Members are aware of the position with regard to the 2014/15 revenue and capital monitoring relevant to the Scrutiny Committee.

 

 

331     RESHAPING SERVICES – A NEW CHANGE PROGRAMME FOR THE COUNCIL (REF) –

 

Cabinet, on 11th August 2014, had agreed in principle to institute a 'Reshaping Services' strategy and associated change programme. 

 

The Director of Development Services, in presenting the report, advised the Committee that Central Government’s austerity drive had created a period of unprecedented financial pressures within the public sector.   The latest draft Medium Term Financial Plan estimated there would be a £10m reduction in the budget in 2014/15 and £32m in total over the next three years.  Failure to deliver the required level of savings would not be an option for the Council and according to many analysts, a period of 'permanent austerity' was now likely for Councils for the foreseeable future. 

 

It was clear that the scale of the challenge to come would mean that 'business as usual', however well managed, would not be enough.  Continued incremental cuts to budgets would simply lead to a steady decline in the quality and availability of public services, dissatisfaction among those who use the services and poor staff morale. 

 

The challenge for the Council therefore was to consider alternative delivery models for services across the board and this was seen as the only way to maintain a broad range of services and to an acceptable standard.

 

Shown under Appendix 1 was a strategy encompassing the various models for service delivery and how these proposals were to be considered. 

 

In referring to page 2 of Appendix 1 of the covering report, Members noted some of the solutions to be considered.  These included:

  • Joint provision with other public sector bodies, examples being the Central South Education Consortium, Prosiect Gwyrdd, Integrated Health and Social Care and Regulatory Services.
  • Delivery by external partners – this could mean delivery by a private sector company, a third sector organisation or other external body.  The Council had already used this option for some services e.g. Parkwood for Leisure services and also the transfer of Dyffryn House to the National Trust.
  • Council-owned companies – this being the splitting of a Council service from its parent and making it a separate, stand-alone company.  The main variants of council-owned companies were joint ventures, where the Council and a private sector company form a new jointly owned company to sell and deliver the service.  Other examples include Local Authority Trading Companies and Employee / community owned companies.

In summarising the strategy the Director of Development Services advised that it would be necessary for the Council to look at both statutory and discretionary services in order to identify alternative delivery models and also areas of increased income generation.  It was important to consider the ramifications of changing the delivery model for services.  For example some services were grant funded by the Welsh Government and in some cases the size of the grant was equitable to 95% of the total cost and the contribution provided by the Council was relatively small.   The Council would be faced with making many tough and hard decisions and it would be important to gauge public reaction if certain services were withdrawn.  The role of Members in this process was seen as very important and as a way of expressing the views and wishes of the local community and residents. 

 

At this point the Director of Visible Services and Housing emphasised the size of savings required over the next few years and if the Council’s decision was to protect Social Services and Education, then this would have a severe impact on certain services, some of which would no longer be undertaken.  He asked Members to be mindful of the decision taken back in 2000 to stop cutting grass during certain periods of the year and the problems and issues that this decision had incurred. 

 

Referring to income generation and car parking Members were advised that the service was closely considering anything where a levy or a charge could be introduced.  It was officers’ responsibility to provide the services within budgets set and it was important for the Authority to maximise charges and car parks had been an area to be reviewed.  A Committee Member stated that in their opinion it was clearly evident that staff within the Council were the people that knew best, when it came down to deciding changes to service models.  The Member advised that Cabinet should consider the creation of a Work Group, led by a Cabinet Member and made up of staff along with non-executive Council members.  The remit of such a group would be to oversee any proposals and to evaluate the impacts.  The Committee, in discussing this proposal, was content for the exact arrangements and remit to be decided by Cabinet, which may involve various sub-groups.

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the 'Reshaping Services' strategy and the associated change programme for the Council be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T Cabinet considers options regarding the creation of either a Working Group or various Sub-Groups, the exact make-up and remit of which should be clearly defined and agreed by Cabinet.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To note the proposals of the 'Reshaping Services' strategy.

 

(2)       To oversee and monitor any proposals made regarding changes to service models and to evaluate their potential impact.

 

 

332     OUTCOME AGREEMENT 2013-2016: END OF YEAR REPORT FOR 2013/14 (DDS) –

 

The Director of Development Services presented the report, the purpose of which was to update Members of the progress made in relation to the achievement of the Outcome Agreement that was agreed with the Welsh Government on 1st April 2014. 

 

The Council entered into four previous agreements with the Welsh Government, these agreements were based on the premise that the Council share common objectives and that agreements could be entered into to assist in achieving these objectives.  Welsh Government paid a grant to the Council to incentivise achievement of targets, to the value of £1.2m per year. 

 

Specifically to this Scrutiny Committee, Development Services had been fully successful in achieving the intended outcomes for the year.  All targets, with the exception of one, were met.  Although reported performance was slightly less (89) than targeted (100) number of Community First clients completing employment related courses, in practice the Council had succeeded in working with 183 such individuals providing targeted support to help them find work. 

 

A Committee Member wished to congratulate the service for achieving the targeted outcomes. 

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the achievement of Year 1 outcomes be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T closer scrutiny during 2014/15 of those areas where the Council has not achieved its actions and targets be undertaken, and proactive action be taken to ensure that they are achieved in 2014/15.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       That the Committee is advised of the achievement of the outcomes listed within the Agreement.

 

(2)       The Vale is fully successful in achieving all agreed outcomes in order for Welsh Government to release the performance incentive grant.

 

 

333     OUTCOME AGREEMENT 2013-2016: END OF YEAR REPORT FOR 2013/14 (DVSH) –

 

The Director of Visible Services and Housing presented the report, the purpose of which was to inform Members of the progress made with the achievement of the Outcome Agreement that was agreed with the Welsh Government on 1st April 2014. 

 

The Council entered into four previous agreements with the Welsh Government (Policy Agreements in 2001-04 and 2004-07, an Improvement Agreement in 2008-2010 and an Outcome Agreement in 2010-2013).  These agreements were based on the premise that the Council shared common objectives and that agreements could be entered into to assist in achieving these objectives.  Welsh Government paid a grant to the Council to incentivise achievement of targets, to the value of £1.2m annually.

 

In relation to this Scrutiny Committee Outcome 5: Reducing landfill had been fully achieved to the intended outcome for the year.  The majority of targets and actions were either completed or on track for completion.  In relation to the percentage of municipal waste collected as source segregated biowastes and composted or treated biologically in another way (WMT010iii) the Council’s reported performance slightly suffered due to the way the performance indicator was calculated.  In fact, green waste performance slightly increased and based on actual tonnage collected for treatment, the Council’s performance increased in 2013/14 in comparison with previous years.  The Council had achieved the Welsh Government’s statutory recycling targets for combined recycling of 54% a year in advance of the 2014/15 deadline.  Overall, all other indicators demonstrated that the Council was making progress in meeting the landfill diversion and recycling targets. 

 

The Chairman queried whether there was any difference in the recycling rates between winter and summer months.  In reply the Director of Visible Services and Housing advised the Committee that there was no seasonal difference and that the level of waste recycled was consistent throughout  the year. 

 

Having considered the report, the Committee

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the achievement of Year 1 outcomes be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T closer scrutiny during 2014/15 of those areas where the Council has not achieved its actions and targets be undertaken, and proactive action be taken to ensure that they are achieved in 2014/15.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       That the Committee is advised of the achievement of the outcomes listed within the Agreement.

 

(2)       The Vale is fully successful in achieving all agreed outcomes in order for Welsh Government to release the performance incentive grant. 

 

 

334     WELSH GOVERNMENT TACKLING POVERTY FUND – VALE OF GLAMORGAN COUNCIL GRANT APPLICATION FOR THE SETTLEMENT OF BARRY (REF) –

 

At its meeting on 28th July 2014, Cabinet had referred the report to the Scrutiny Committee as part of the consultation process. 

 

The Director of Development Services, in providing a summary background, informed Members that following the Council’s unsuccessful Stage 1 bid for Vibrant and Viable Places funding, the Welsh Government had announced that the Council would be eligible for a ring-fenced fund aimed at tackling poverty.  In April 2014 the Minister for Housing and Regeneration announced that the Council would be eligible for £1m in capital funding over the three financial years from 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17.  Set out at Appendix 1 to the report was the Welsh Government’s guidance for Local Authorities with Appendix 2A outlining the business case for intervention.  Appendix 2B was the project schedule spreadsheet and attached at Appendix 2C was an indicative map identifying the areas of targeted regeneration investment within Barry.  This was considered important as there was a strong geographical correlation in Barry between the areas of concentrated deprivation, areas of concentrated social housing and traditional shopping areas. 

 

The overall estimated cost of the programme of projects identified in the Council's application was £1.423m.  The Council had applied for the maximum level of funding from the Welsh Government i.e. £1m.  This represented 70.3% of the overall estimated cost.  The Council would provide match funding to the level of 29.7% i.e. £423k to support the programme of projects outlined in the application. The Council's match funding elements counted in the application were identified in the Capital Programme.  Barry Regeneration Project Development Fund capital allocation for the years 2014/15 to 2016/17 was the subject of a separate report on the agenda for the meeting of Cabinet.  That report identified budgets of £40k for 2014/15; £116k for 2015/16; and £40k for 2016/17.  The other match funding elements were capital allocations arising from Section 106 legal agreements.  They included £81k for 2014/15 (Council 7th May 2014, Minute 1093, Cabinet 10th March 2014, Minute C2239 refer); £60k for 2015/16; and £86k for 2016/17.

 

The programme of projects or interventions identified in the Council's application are as follows:

 

Targeted Regeneration Investment - Barry Town Centre and its Hinterland

 

Town Centre – Third Sector Hub: The Council and its partners wished to effect a step change in the capacity of the Third Sector in Barry and raise the level of voluntary and citizen action in the town.  The current voluntary sector financial model made them vulnerable to economic pressures and unable to develop the capacity to partner with the Local Authority to provide services to the town's residents.  A time-limited opportunity had arisen as the key bodies charged with promoting and supporting the Third Sector and developing voluntary action, the two local infrastructure organisations, Vale Centre for Voluntary Services (VCVS) and Vale Volunteer Bureau, were committed to a merger by March 2015. The organisations currently had separate premises, neither of which was suitable for a new enlarged and enhanced service.  Funding was being sought for VCVS to commission feasibility work to identify a suitable location in the Town Centre and develop budget costs for the proposed scheme which would also see incubator facilities for community and social enterprises and meeting space to develop collaborative working. 

 

Improve Health and Play Opportunities: Work undertaken in 2013 for the Vale of Glamorgan Council Local Development Plan 2011-2026 concluded that there was an overall shortage of children's play space in Barry.  This work also concluded that Castleland ward had an under-provision of children's play space of 0.71ha and of outdoor sport space of 7.76ha.  Funding was being sought to deliver a programme of physical investment in the Castleland ward adding value to activities funded through the Barry Communities First Cluster Plan, Section 106 financial contributions and Housing Renewal Area.  The programme would involve working with local residents and stakeholders to better understand local needs and deliver quality schemes to meet them.  A key aim of the programme would be to secure improvements to George Street Play Area for a multi-use games area and a local equipped area for play.  Match funding was identified in the Council's Capital Programme.

 

Holton Road Grant Programme: There was a gap and an opportunity for the Council to take the lead and bring benefits not just to traditional shopping areas (in terms of increasing residential footfall) but to the general shortage of affordable housing in Barry.  The market trend has seen demand for shop units fall while the need for affordable and rented homes has grown.  Without the easy mortgage finance of the recent past, responsibility therefore falls on public sector initiatives and the particular need for affordable homes.  Many properties within Barry Town Centre had vacant and redundant space, particularly above retail premises, and this grant sought to assist owners to bring this redundant empty space back into use for residential purposes, thereby creating vibrancy in the Town Centre, whilst at the same time providing affordable housing for those who work in, or require to be close to, the town centre.  Match funding was identified in the Council's Capital Programme.

 

Targeted Regeneration Investment – Main Street Action Plan

 

Main Street Grant Programme: A programme of investment primarily promoting the conversion of empty commercial premises to homes and homes above commercial premises in what was formally a traditional district shopping centre.  The intention was to provide a range of different grants and assistance to tackle identified problems such as housing disrepair; empty properties; area regeneration; poor conditions in the private rented sector; and home energy efficiency, as well as meeting the critical need for additional affordable housing in Barry and helping to mitigate the impact of Welfare Reforms by supplying one and / or two bed units.

 

The Regulatory Reform (Housing Assistance) (England and Wales) Order 2002 required the Council to adopt a Housing Renewal Policy in order that it could provide grants and other forms of assistance to property owners.  The Council met this requirement through the Housing Renewal Policy 2014.  The Council must amend this Policy to provide the legal power to offer the proposed Main Street Grant Programme.  The amendment to the Housing Renewal Policy 2014 was attached in Appendix 4 to the report and would be inserted into the current policy.  No consultation has been undertaken on the grant products, but they were identical to the assistance offered through the Castleland Renewal Area in Upper Holton Road (Cabinet 10th March 2014, C2237 refers) which was subject to consultation.

 

Improve the Quality of Public Spaces: Work undertaken in 2013 for the Vale of Glamorgan Council Local Development Plan 2011-2026 concluded that there was an overall shortage of children's play space in Barry.  This work also concluded that Cadoc ward had an under-provision of outdoor sport space of 15.34ha.  Physical investment in Victoria Gardens would add value to the Main Street Grant Programme and its hinterland.  It would also lead to better outcomes for residents in the Communities First cluster area.  Match funding was identified in the Council's Capital Programme.

 

Targeted Regeneration Investment – Gibbonsdown Community Regeneration

 

Fuel Poverty Reduction Measures: Employ and train a local person to become an Energy Champion to support the change of residents’ behaviour in their use of energy at home by providing advice on energy efficiency; providing advice and support on fuel tariffs and fuel debt to directly tackle fuel poverty; and help reduce carbon emissions.  To support this post an Energy App would be available for some households.  The wireless technology could be viewed by the householder using a TV with set top box and enabled the households to visualise the energy being consumed to assist in the behaviour change process.  The post would also support the setting up of a service hub in the former Estate Office to develop life skills and add value to the activities funded through the Communities First Cluster Plan.  Funding was being sought for the supply and installation of the App; other fuel poverty capital measures; and the capital cost of converting and equipping the former Estate Office.  Match funding was identified in the Council's Capital Programme for the direct running cost of the post.

 

Improve Health and Play Opportunities: Work undertaken in 2013 for the Vale of Glamorgan Council Local Development Plan 2011-2026 concluded that there was an overall shortage of children's play space in Barry.  This work also concluded that Gibbonsdown ward had an under-provision of children's play space of 1.38ha. Funding was being sought to deliver a programme of physical investment in the Gibbonsdown ward adding value to activities funded through the Barry Communities First Cluster Plan and Welsh Housing Quality Standard.  The programme would involve working with local residents and stakeholders to better understand local needs and deliver quality schemes at Dryden Terrace and Meggitt Road Play Areas.  Match funding was identified in the Council's Capital Programme.

 

Targeted Regeneration Investment – Legacy Programme

 

Making Better Use of Property Owned by Third Sector Groups – Third Sector Youth Partnership and Community Internet Cafe: Funding was being sought for Barry YMCA working in partnership with the Council's Youth Services to refurbish and reduce the size of an existing and unused cafe area to become a more functional community and internet cafe which would be managed by a start-up social business providing training and employment opportunities for adults currently outside the employment market.  The refurbished cafe area would create a separate space for Youth Services projects and activities which encourage skills development to engage and progress a young person into education, training, volunteering or employment.  The Youth Engagement and Progression Framework would influence Youth Services work in ensuring that the Hub was utilised for engagement and progression purposes, and particularly in reducing the number of young people Not in Education Employment or Training.  Movement of young people would be tracked and monitored to ensure progression once engaged and add value to the activities funded through the Communities First Cluster Plan.  In addition the cafe would be also available for use by the wider community, engaging 'hard to reach’ sectors of the community and providing opportunities for increasing digital literacy.

 

Monitoring and Evaluation of Targeted Regeneration Investment

 

Monitoring and Evaluation Costs for the Programme of Projects: The Project Schedule Spreadsheet provided the starting point for analysis, monitoring and evaluation of the programme of projects.  This process would consider both the direct and long-term impact of the programme.  Furthermore, it was important that the consideration of the impact of the programme of projects on different groups, whether intended or unintended, was built into the monitoring and evaluation process.

 

A Committee Member expressed concern in relation to the criteria to increase economic activity and jobs and noted that one of the objectives was to renew derelict shops into new homes which would go against the premise of job creation.  In reply the Principal Regeneration Officer advised Members that a main stipulation of the grant funding was in relation to capital investment.  A part of the programme was around the commission of proper mentoring facilities within the target areas in order to give people the skills to re-enter the job market and to give them a resource within their community to help them get back into employment. 

 

A Committee Member noted the plans to improve the play areas within Castleland ward but raised concerns in respect of alley gates and the ability for local residents to access these areas. 

 

The Committee was keen to offer its thanks to officers and the service for the efforts for the application of tackling poverty within Barry. 

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the contents of the report and the proposals in relation to the Tackling  Poverty Agenda within the Settlement of Barry be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the Committee’s thanks be passed on to relevant officers and staff. 

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To note the work to tackle poverty within Barry.

 

(2)       To offer the Committee’s thanks.           

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