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 SCRUTINY COMMITTEE (HOUSING AND PUBLIC PROTECTION)

 

 

Minutes of a meeting held on 16th July, 2014.

 

Present:  Councillor C.J. Williams (Chairman); Councillor J. Drysdale (Vice-Chairman); Councillors Mrs. C.L. Curtis, Mrs. V.M. Hartrey, Mrs. A.J. Moore, Ms. R.F. Probert, R.P. Thomas, Mrs. M.R. Wilkinson and E. Williams.

 

Also present:  Councillor N. Moore and Messrs G. Amos, B. Fisher and A. Raybould (Tenant Working Group).

 

 

233     APOLOGY FOR ABSENCE -

 

This was received from Councillor J.C. Bird.

 

 

234     MINUTES -

 

RECOMMENDED - T H A T the minutes of the meeting held on 18th June, 2014 be approved as a correct record.

 

 

235     DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST -

 

No declarations were received.

 

 

236     REVENUE AND CAPITAL MONITORING FOR THE PERIOD 1ST APRIL TO 31ST MAY, 2014 (DDS & DVSH) -

 

Committee were advised of the position in respect of revenue and capital expenditure for the period 1st April to 31st May, 2014 regarding those revenue and capital budgets which formed the Committee’s remit. 

 

The current forecast for the Revenue Budget was for a balanced budget.

 

Public Sector Housing (HRA) - there was currently a £33,000 favourable variance.  The proposed restructure for Housing Services had yet to be implemented.  As a result, there was a slight underspend on the profiled budget but at this early stage, it was still anticipated that the HRA would outturn on target.

 

General Fund Housing - there was currently a £73,000 favourable variance.  At present, the variance was due to the savings being made on the use of temporary accommodation for the homeless.  Although it was still early in the year, it was anticipated that the General Fund Housing budget would outturn on target.

 

Public Protection - there was currently a favourable variance of £8,000 to the profiled budget.  The budget was currently expected to outturn on target.

 

Other services were anticipated to outturn on target by the year-end.

 

Appendix 2 to the report detailed financial progress on the Capital Programme as of 31st May, 2014. 

 

The Monitoring Report showed actual expenditure for the month of May 2014 and was matched by a similar figure in the profile to date column, thereby showing no variances.  Profiled expenditure had been requested from Project Managers and would be updated in the report to the next meeting of the Committee.

 

RECOMMENDED - T H A T the position with regard to the 2014/15 Revenue and Capital Budgets be noted.

 

Reason for recommendation

 

The Scrutiny Committee note the position with regard to the 2014/15 Revenue and Capital Monitoring.

 

 

237     CLOSURE OF ACCOUNTS 2013/14 (DDS & DVSH) -

 

Committee were informed of the provisional financial outturn for services within its remit, for the 2013/14 financial year.

 

The following table was presented which compared the amended estimate and actual expenditure for the Committee:

 

Service

Amended Revenue Estimate

Total Provisional Actual

Variance Favourable  () Adverse

 

       £’000

          £’000

             £’000

YOS

707

707

0

General Fund Housing

1,182

982

200

Public Protection

2,689

2,665

24

Private Housing

11,287

11,281

6

 

 

 

 

Total

15,865

15,635

230

 

 

 

 

 

The main reasons for the variances were set out below:

 

Youth Offending Service - Nil variance.

 

There were adverse variances of £25,000 on the upgrading of hardware and software and £45,000 to provide contributions towards remand costs.

 

There were favourable variances of £4,000 on energy and £66,000 on staff due to temporarily vacant posts. 

 

General Fund Housing - Favourable variance of £200,000.

 

There was a £200,000 favourable variance under this service heading.  There were adverse variances following a transfer to provisions of £65,000 for Housing Data Market Support and a transfer to reserves of £88,000 for Rural Housing Needs assessment and £266,000 for potential costs of the Welfare Reform Act.

 

There were favourable variances of £51,000 on staffing due to staff vacancies pending reorganisation, £17,000 on the Spend to Save Budgets, £21,000 on supplies and services within Supporting People and Housing Strategy Teams, £530,000 on temporary accommodation for homeless.  Previously, single individuals who presented themselves as homeless were housed in emergency accommodation at bed and breakfasts around the Vale.  This was very costly as the Housing Benefit payable for such placements did not fully recover the room charge and the Council had previously picked up the net cost.  During 2013/14, the Homelessness Team sought co-operation from a number of local private landlords, to use some of their larger properties as 'shared’ accommodation, and were able to place a number of 'single’ clients in one property as a temporary solution whilst clients awaited social housing via the Council’s Homes4U waiting list.  This had a nil impact in terms of cost of the Council as the clients were able to claim HB for the cost of their room.  In addition to private landlords, the Homelessness Team had also used some Council house properties which had been traditionally hard to let to alleviate the pressure on the temporary accommodation budget.  There were current 54 single homeless clients placed in these 'shared’ accommodation properties, at nil cost to the Council.  The net cost of placing these in bed and breakfast accommodation would be in excess of £400,000.

 

Public Protection - Favourable variance of £24,000.

 

There was an adverse variance of £201,000 for costs associated with the ongoing issue of abandoned horses within the Vale but WG grant to the value of £127,000 was received to partly off-set these costs.  There were also adverse variances of £15,000 on the Coroner’s Service to due higher than anticipated costs of medical reports, mainly due to newly introduced charges for histo-pathology tests by the University Health Board and £7,000 relating to other costs.

 

There were favourable variances on staffing of £90,000 as part of bringing the current staffing structure in line with those identified to meet future savings targets and £30,000 on pollution control expenditure due to work with external service providers to reduce the costs of maintaining monitoring equipment and analysing samples. 

 

Private Sector Housing - Favourable variance of £3,000.

 

There was an adverse variance following a transfer of £118,000 to the Regeneration and Economic Development Fund.

 

There were favourable variances of £75,000 from additional grant agency fees achieved from staff recharges to capital for administering the Renewal Area face-lifting project within Barry’s Castleland Ward, £65,000 from agency fee charges on Disabled Facilities Grants as a higher number of grant applications were processed in comparison with the previous year.  This increase in income was partly off-set by additional expenditure of £34,000 on staffing due to the employment of an additional Occupational Therapist in order to achieve the higher number of grant approvals.

 

Rent Allowances/Council Tax Benefits - Favourable variance of £3,000.

 

There was an adverse variance of £860,000 following a transfer to the Regeneration and Economic Development Fund. 

 

There were favourable variances of £210,000 on Discretionary Housing Payments.  There were also favourable variances of £247,000 from recovered overpayments and associated subsidy, £388,000 on Council Tax Benefit and £18,000 on audit fee savings.  Some of these savings were being held over and would be used against future savings.  It was noted that there was uncertainty surrounding the impact Universal Credit would have once implemented. 

 

Housing Revenue Account

 

The 2013/14 Housing Revenue Account resulted in a deficit of £7,164,000 compared to the revised estimate deficit of £8,129,000.  The working balance opened at £13,570,000 and closed at £6,406,000. 

 

The net favourable HRA revenue budget variance of £965,000 were identified as follows:

 

Supervision and Management General - Favourable variance £1,014,000.

 

There were favourable variances in Support and Central Management Costs £662,000, staffing through vacancies and pension pay out savings £67,000, software/hardware and other non-staffing costs relating to Housing Teams £58,000, Incentive to Move Schemes £52,000, Tenant Participation £49,000, Homes4U advertising £17,000, Welfare Advice Team £52,000 and other savings of £57,000. 

 

Supervision and Management Special Services - Favourable variance £460,000.

 

The budget was split into three areas, Ty Iolo Homeless Hostel, Vale Temporary Accommodation and Vale Special Services.  The favourable variance was a combination of the following:  £116,000 Ty Iolo which reflected the reduction in the use of agency staff and a reduction in other revenue expenditure such as security cover and furniture and fittings; £20,000 Temporary Accommodation mainly due to savings in utility costs and furnishings; and £324,000 Special Services which was made up of £111,000 on energy bills, cleaning £31,000, fixtures £27,000, environmental improvements £72,000, grounds maintenance £56,000 and other favourable variances of £27,000. 

 

 

Housing Repairs - Favourable variance £192,000.

 

A number of factors had affected the level of expenditure on repairs; previously some large scale jobs would have been charged through the repairs budget but are now funded via the Capital Programme.  In addition, as a consequence of the majority of the housing stock being brought up to Welsh Housing Quality Standard, the number of repairs had reduced. 

 

Capital Financing Costs - Favourable variance £8,000.

 

Both principal and interest charges were lower than anticipated. 

 

Rents, Rates, Taxes and Other Charges - Favourable variance £33,000.

 

This was largely due to a favourable Council Tax variance of £32,000 for void properties.

 

HRA Subsidy Payable - Favourable variance £82,000.

 

The HRA negative subsidy payment for 2013/14 was less than budgeted. 

 

Increase in the provision for Bad and Doubtful Debts - Favourable variance £56,000.

 

It was anticipated that the level of bad debts would be high following the implementation of the Under Occupation Charge for Council tenants as part of the Welfare Reform Act.  However, the increase in tenant arrears had been less than expected. 

 

Capital Expenditure from Revenue Account - Adverse variance £934,000.

 

A higher contribution was required than budgeted towards the Housing Improvement Plan due to increased expenditure. 

 

Rent Collected on Dwellings and Non-Dwellings - Favourable variance £97,000.

 

Rents collected were 1% more than budgeted. 

 

Non-Dwelling Rents - Adverse variance £24,000.

 

Rents collected on garages were 8% less than budgeted. 

 

Interest Received - Adverse variance £20,000.

 

The average LIBID rate for the year was lower than anticipated. 

 

Charges for Services and Facilities - Favourable variance £1,000.

 

The overall outturn for this Committee was a variance of £926,000 and was detailed in Appendix 3 to the report.  The major variance was on the Housing Improvement Programme scheme where there was a variance of £1,035,000 mainly due to expenditure being brought forward from 2014/15. 

 

Attached at Appendix 4 to the report was a schedule showing reserves which fell within this Committee’s remit as at 31st March, 2014.  The reserves had been reviewed and were currently considered adequate for reported uses. 

 

Having considered the report, it was

 

RECOMMENDED - T H A T the contents of the report, the financial measures taken and proposed be noted.

 

Reason for recommendation

 

To note the report and the financial measures taken and proposed.

 

 

238     DRAFT RECHARGEABLE REPAIRS POLICY (REF) -

 

Approval was sought from Cabinet on 30th June, 2014 to undertake further stakeholder consultation on a draft Rechargeable Repairs Policy.

 

Generally, the Council was responsible for repairing and maintaining the structure of its Council Housing and any fixtures and fittings originally provided. Tenants were informed of their repair responsibilities when they signed the Tenancy Agreement. However, tenants were responsible for any damage they caused to their properties covering damage caused accidently, deliberately or through neglect. 

 

Tenants were ultimately responsible for behaviour of family and visitors and any damage caused to the property would be rechargeable. 

 

In cases of criminal damage or damage caused by unknown third parties the tenant was still responsible and the Council would expect the tenant to report such incidents to the police.  In these circumstances and by exception charges may be waived in situations such as domestic violence.

 

The collection of rechargeable repairs had been a relatively low priority for the Council in the past due to the costs involved in collection and the previous relatively low level of income received.

 

However, there was now a need to review the Councils rechargeable repairs policies and procedures because of the level of recent and future investment in our homes in achieving the Welsh Housing Quality Standard, coupled with the improved condition of void properties with the introduction of the improved re-let standard. Given the level of investment to improve the condition of our tenants' homes it was not fair that all tenants continued to pay for the wilful damage and neglect caused by relatively few.

 

The draft Rechargeable Repairs Policy aimed to ensure that there were mechanisms in place to recharge for damage caused, whilst ensuring that any special circumstances were taken into account.

 

Whilst rechargeable repairs may have occurred during a tenancy, they may also have occurred when a tenancy was terminated and the Council had to carry out works to the property to make it ready for the next tenant.

 

Rechargeable repairs policies could vary from organisation to organisation. For some, repairs were raised and works carried out on the basis of acceptance/promise by the tenant that they would pay. Given the Council's previous experience of attempting to recover costs however, there was a risk that debts could escalate and rechargeable repairs debt recovery cost more that the cost of the debt itself.

 

In order to mitigate this potential eventuality it was proposed, that under the draft Vale of Glamorgan policy, rechargeable works were only carried out when tenants had paid in advance for repairs to be undertaken. The only exception to this would be where repairs had been identified as required under Health and Safety and in those circumstances the work would be undertaken and an invoice raised against the tenant's Housing rent account.

 

Tenants would be given the opportunity to undertake the work themselves if they wished thereby limiting the number of rechargeable repairs raised in the first place. The Council would however have to ensure that where tenants completed or arranged for the work to be done that the Council was satisfied that the work had been carried out to an appropriate/acceptable standard.

 

In the case of substantial damage, destruction or neglect however Officers would consider taking possession action against the tenant for a breach of tenancy resulting in recovery of the Council Property. It was anticipated that this action would only be undertaken as a last resort after giving the tenant the opportunity to rectify the breach. In some circumstances this could be deemed to be criminal damage and would be dealt with via the council's Anti Social Behaviour policy.

 

Currently tenants were not recharged the cost of repairs which were their responsibility when tenancies were terminated. Consequently the Housing Department, and by implication our tenants, paid for the costs which should be borne by the outgoing tenant.

 

Rechargeable repairs where possible would now be identified during the pre- termination inspection before the end of tenancy and tenants would be given the opportunity to rectify faults before they handed their keys in.

 

At the meeting the Cabinet Member for Leisure, Parks, Culture and Sports Development commented that it was important to take action on all Council properties to ensure that they were appropriately looked after.

 

The Leader further commented that the Council was spending a considerable amount of money on council properties and that this policy would help to safeguard the investment.

 

Cabinet had

 

Resolved -

 

(1)          That the draft Rechargeable Repairs Policy, attached at Appendix 1 to the report, be approved.

 

(2)          That the draft Rechargeable Repairs Policy, attached at Appendix 1 to the report be referred to Scrutiny Committee (Housing and Public Protection) for consideration.

 

(3)          That the Head of Housing and Building Services undertakes further consultation with the Housing Services Review Group.

 

(4)          That a further report be provided to Cabinet on conclusion of the consultation processes for the final policy to be agreed.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)             To agree the draft policy prior to any consultation taking place.

 

(2-4)    To enable Cabinet to make informed decisions on any required changes to the draft policy following consultation.

 

Having considered the decisions of Cabinet, it was

 

RECOMMENDED - T H A T the decisions of Cabinet be noted.

 

Reason for recommendation

 

Having regard to the decisions of Cabinet

 

 

239     HOUSING AND BUILDING SERVICES END OF YEAR PERFORMANCE REPORT 2013/14 AND TARGET SETTING 2014/15 (DVSH) -

 

Committee received the end of year performance results for the period 1st April, 2013 to 31st March, 2014 and the proposed service targets for 2014/15.

 

It was reported that the Department had completed 58% of service plan actions at the end of the year, with a further 2% on track for a later completion date.  There were a total of 69 actions in the Plan of which 40 were completed, 1 was on track, 25 had slipped and 3 had not started. 

 

The Department had completed 53% of the actions against the Corporate Plan that were included in the 2013/14 Service Plans.  Of the 32 actions within the Service Plan, 17 were completed, 13 had slipped and 2 had not started.

 

There were no Improvement Objective Action for Housing and Building Services.

 

There were no Outcome Agreement Actions in the 2013/14 Plan, as the Outcome Agreement was not agreed until 1st April, 2014.  Of the 15 Performance Indicators in the Plan, 4 did not have targets set for 2013/14.  5 met or exceeded the target at the end of the year, 3 were within 10% of target and 2 missed the target by more than 10%.  Data was unavailable for one indicator.

 

In terms of notable performance, an additional £625,000 had been secured in Social Housing Grant from the Welsh Government to deliver 14 new one and two bedroom affordable housing units in partnership with Newydd Housing Association. 

 

The 'Lean’ principle adopted in managing empty properties from the 'keys in’ stage to 'keys out’ stage continued to yield improvement.  The number of let able empty properties (excluding those empties that were classed as 'hard to treat’ or suspended lets) had reduced significantly since April 2013 from 107 to 53. 

 

The Welsh Housing Quality Standard was being delivered to time and to budget.

 

Even with the pressures of welfare reform, the year-end rent arrears figures were lower than those of 2012/13. 

 

A feasibility event had taken place on 10th April, 2014 to develop further service improvements through a Housing Solutions Service.  Feedback from this event would be taken forward to inform options. 

 

A consultant had been appointed to write an Older Person’s Accommodation Strategy with care and housing representatives.  The work was being progressed through Social Services.

 

A review of the role of the Tenant Engagement Associates had been deferred until 2014/15 due to additional consultation training being provided for Tenant Engagement Associates.  A recent Housing Service Review Forum agreed to delay the visit to a Registered Social Landlord until training needs had been identified and agreed for the Group.  A report analysing gaps and underrepresented groups across the Vale as part of the Tenant Engagement Strategy had been delayed until June 2014 as sub-groups and fun day evidence was still being collated. 

 

A review of performance indicators and targets for 2014/15 had taken place to ensure that the Council collected indicators which effectively monitored Service Plan objectives and outcomes.  New indicators and deletions had been proposed to enable services to better demonstrate achievement of service objectives and outcomes. 

 

Some targets had been set in accordance with previously agreed targets in statutory Council documents such as the Improvement Plan and the Outcome Agreement.  Where relevant, this was indicated in the comment box in Appendix 2 to the report.

 

The target setting report also included end of year performance data.  In a small number of instances, this may differ from the end of year data in Appendix 1.  This was because reports for Appendix 1 were produced through the Ffynnon system, and therefore had to be finalised before the end of the contract at the end of May.  Therefore, where data had been updated or verified since that date, this had been updated in Appendix 2, but not Appendix 1. 

 

Having considered the contents of the report, it was

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the service performance results and remedial actions to be taken to address service underperformance be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T progress to date in achieving key outcomes as outlined in the Corporate Plan 2013-17 and the Improvement Plan Part 1 2013/14 be noted.

 

(3)       T H A T the proposed service targets for 2014/15 be noted.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To ensure the Council is effectively assessing its performance in line with the requirement to secure continuous improvement outlined in the Local Government (Wales) Measure 2009.

 

(2)       To enable the Council to demonstrate achievement of its objectives and identify service areas for improvement work.

 

(3)       To ensure challenging targets are set against the Council’s measures for improvement, reflecting the Council’s commitment to continuously improve services whilst mindful of significant financial and service demand pressures over the coming year.

 

 

240     DEVELOPMENT SERVICES END OF YEAR PERFORMANCE REPORT 2013/14 AND TARGET SETTING 2014/15 (DDS) –

 

Committee received the end of year performance results for the period 1st April 2013 to 31st March 2014 and the proposed service targets for 2014/15. 

 

The Directorate had completed 71% of service plan actions at end of year, with a further 11% on track for a later completion date.  Details were available under each objective.  There were a total of 157 actions in the plan; 112 were completed, 17 were on track, 26 had slipped and 2 had not started yet. 

 

The Directorate had completed 70% of the actions against the Corporate Plan that were included in the 2013/14 service plan and a further 23% of actions were on track for a later completion date.  Of the 44 actions within the service plan, 31 were completed, 10 were on track and 3 had slipped. 

 

67% of the Improvement Objective actions were completed. 

 

Delivery time for Disabled Facilities Grants (DFGs) continued to improve with the Council’s performance at 284 days from 346 in the previous year.  Over 97% of people who received DFGs during 2013/14 felt that the assistance had made them safer and more independent in their own homes. 

 

The tender for a framework contract to enable a more effective delivery of Adaptation works was advertised on 31st March 2014.  It was intended that the framework would commence in September 2014. 

 

A review of performance indicators had taken place to ensure that the Council collected indicators which effectively monitored service plan objectives and outcomes.  New indicators and deletions had been proposed to enable services to better demonstrate achievement of service objectives and outcomes.

 

Some targets were set in accordance with previously agreed targets in statutory Council documents such as the Improvement Plan and the Outcome Agreement. 

 

The target setting report also included end of year performance data.  In a small number of instances, this may differ from the end of year data in Appendix 1.  This was because reports for Appendix 1 were produced through the Ffynnon system, and therefore had to be finalised before the end of the contract at the end of May.  Therefore, where data had been updated or verified since this date, this had been updated in Appendix 2, but not in Appendix 1.

 

In relation to title number DS01/A010 – implement additional houses in multiple occupation licensing within the Castleland Renewal Area, Committee were informed that the scheme was 100% complete and Committee were asked to note this amended figure. 

 

Having considered the report, it was

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the service performance results and remedial actions to be taken to address service underperformance be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T progress to date in achieving key outcomes as outlined in the Corporate Plan 2013-17 and the Improvement Plan Part 1 2013/14 be noted.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To ensure the Council is effectively assessing its performance in line with the requirement to secure continuous improvement outlined in the Local Government (Wales) Measure 2009.

 

(2)       To enable the Council to demonstrate achievement of its objectives and identify service areas for improvement work.

  

 

241     UPDATE ON HOUSING IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMME (DVSH) –

 

Committee were provided with performance information relating to the Welsh Housing Quality Standard (WHQS) improvement works in Council housing in the Vale of Glamorgan.

 

From the table attached to the report, it was evident that, overall, operational performance continued to improve in both terms of delivery times and customer satisfaction.  Officers from Property Services continue to have regular meetings with all contractors at both an operational and senior management level.  Complaint monitoring was being undertaken on a regular basis.  The Tenant Liaison Team continued to support tenants through the upheaval of works and ensure that they are informed at an early stage of the complex nature of the work being undertaken.  Officers from both Housing and Building Services and Property Services continued to work together to seek appropriate forms of respite for those tenants who were unable to live in their home whilst the works were being undertaken. 

 

RECOMMENDED – T H A T the current performance and the improving delivery times and customer satisfaction rates be noted.

 

Reason for recommendation

 

To ensure Members are furnished with necessary performance information pertaining to WHQS.

 

 

242     SCRUTINY DECISION TRACKING OF RECOMMENDATIONS AND WORK PROGRAMME SCHEDULE 2014/15 (DR) -

 

Committee were advised of the progress in relation to recommendations that had been made by the Scrutiny Committee for the following periods:

 

·                April 2011 – March 2012

·                April 2012 – March 2013

·                April 2013 – March 2014

·                April – June 2014.

 

With regard to the work programme schedule which was attached at Appendix E to the report, the Democratic and Scrutiny Services Officer informed Members that the schedule was a proposed list of items for consideration and that the list may be subject to change depending upon the prevailing circumstances.

 

RECOMMENDED –

 

(1)       T H A T the progress in relation to the Scrutiny Committee recommendations be noted and that the following recommendations be agreed completed:

 

12 March 2014

Min. No. 942 – Task and Finish Activities for 2014/15 (HDS) – Recommended

(3)   That the review to be submitted for consideration on behalf of the Scrutiny Committee (Housing and Public Protection) be as follows:

 

“An examination of affordable housing within the Vale of Glamorgan encompassing the use of land trust and co-operatives and the potential to increase rural housing stock and undertaking a detailed assessment of opportunity for new housing developments within the Vale.â€

On 30th April 2014 the Scrutiny Committee Chairmen and Vice-Chairmen Group agreed

(1)   That the No. 1 Priority for Task and Finish Review work for 2014/15 be:

An Examination of the Potential Contribution Assistive Technology Can Provide in the Development of a Dementia Supportive Community in the Vale of Glamorgan Through Enabling People to Live Independently.

(2)   That the Group receive a report to each future meeting on progress on the above Review in order to assist consideration of further prioritisation of topics as appropriate.

(Min. No. (d) refers)

Completed

02 April 2014

Min. No. 1000 – Update on the Implementation of the Empty Homes Strategy 2012-2013 (DDS) – Recommended

(2)   That the Cabinet be requested to write to the relevant Welsh Government Minister requesting that the funding of the revenue costs of dedicated Empty Homes Officer posts across Wales be funded by the Welsh Government.

Cabinet, on 12th May, 2014 noted the report and resolved

(2)   That the request to write to the relevant Welsh Government Minister requesting that the funding of the revenue costs of dedicated Empty Homes Officer posts across Wales be funded by the Welsh Government be refused due to the reasons as detailed above.

(Min. No. C2319 refers)

Completed

18 June 2014

Min. No. – Exit from Housing Revenue Account Subsidy System (REF) – Recommended that the Council do not lose sight of its own existing stock, including the upgrades that are overdue and that the development of new-builds should not distract from that.

Referred to Scrutiny Committee (Corporate Resources) on 24th June 2014.

Completed

 

(2)       T H A T the work programme schedule attached at Appendix B to the report be approved and uploaded to the Council’s website.

 

Reasons for recommendations

 

(1)       To maintain effective tracking of the Scrutiny Committee’s recommendations.

 

(2)       For information.