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Agenda Item No

The Vale of Glamorgan Council

Cabinet Meeting: 06 October, 2014

Report of the Cabinet Member for Children's Services

School Performance Report 2013/14 for end of Foundation Phase, Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3 and an overview of the Literacy and Numeracy Assessments

Purpose of the Report

1. To inform members of pupil attainment and school performance outcomes..

Recommendations

1. That members note pupil attainment and school performance outcomes.

2. That the report is referred to Scrutiny [Lifelong Learning] for consideration.

Reasons for the Recommendations

1. To ensure members are aware of the attainment of pupils and the performance of schools in 2013/14.

2. To ensure Scrutiny Members consider the report.

Background

2. Statutory end of Key Stage Teacher Assessment (TA) is administered at the end of the Foundation Phase, Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3, when pupils are aged 7, 11 and 14 years old respectively.

 

3. The national minimum expectations for pupils at the end of the Foundation Phase and Key Stages 2 and 3 are as follows: Outcome 5 at the end of the Foundation Phase, Level 4 at the end of Key Stage 2 and Level 5 at the end of Key Stage 3.

 

4. Additionally, expectations for more able pupils at the end of each phase are as follows: Outcome 6 at the end of the Foundation Phase, Level 5 at the end of Key Stage 2 and Levels 6 and 7 at the end of Key Stage 3.

 

5. The Vale of Glamorgan Council's ambition is that educational outcomes in the Vale are the best in Wales and match those of the most successful authorities in England with similar socio economic profiles and to ensure that all schools' performance is benchmarked in the high or highest benchmarking positions when compared to similar authorities, in relation to educational outcomes at the foundation phase and key stages 2 and 3 it is not feasible to make comparison with outcomes in England.

 

6. In general, the Vale of Glamorgan is advantaged in terms of socio-economic deprivation. The proportion of pupils entitled to receive free school meals (FSM) is used as a proxy indicator of socio-economic deprivation. In 2013 -14 the Vale ranked 6th lowest overall for the proportion of pupils entitled to receive free school meals (4th lowest at primary level & 6th lowest at secondary level) i.e. it is relatively advantaged. These findings indicate that the aggregated performance of Vale schools should be significantly higher than for Wales as a whole and always rank in the 6 highest performing local Authorities (LAs), as a minimum expectation.

Relevant Issues and Options

7. When considering LA performance, the key performance indicators (Pls) for consideration are as follows:

Local Authority (LA) performance compared with the all Wales means and the LA performance compared to the top six highest performing LAs in Wales (Appendix 1);

 

LA performance trends over time, when compared with the all Wales means and prior performance;

the relative gap in performance between LA means and the all Wales means;

the spot rank position of the performance of the local Authority when compared with LAs across Wales; the spot rank, preferentially, should be in first position or, as a minimum, within the top six highest performing LAs in Wales;

for each indicator in each Phase, the proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking positions when compared with similar schools and ranked against LAs across Wales.

 

8. Individual school performance is compared with that of other similar schools and allocated to a 'quartile'. The performance of similar schools is described as being in the highest, high, low or lowest quartile and also as either above or below the median i.e. either in the top 50%, or in the bottom 50%, of similar schools.

 

9. Estyn places great emphasis on the need to ensure that at least 50% of schools across an LA, for each indicator within each phase, are located in the high or highest benchmarking positions, or above the median.

 

10. Welsh Government uses this information to rank individual LAs according to the proportion of schools, in each LA, that are located above, or below the median. This is known as the LA School Benchmarking Rank comparative information: this information will be published later this year.

Progress in the Foundation Phase:

 

Indications are that the standards, at Outcome 5 for all PIs, have continued to improve (Appendix 2)

The proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quartiles for Language Communication Welsh (LCW) and Foundation Phase Outcome Indicator (FPOI) has increased; however, the proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quartiles has marginally decreased for Mathematical Development to 50%. This decline is replicated in Personal Social Development (PSD) and Language Communication English (LCE) which fall slightly below 50% of the highest and higher benchmarking quartiles 47% and 49% respectively.

Performance exceeded targets at all PIs at outcome 5 (Appendix 3). The Council's rank position for Foundation Phase, at the expected outcome 5, compared to the rest of Wales is 4th for the FPOI, 2nd for PSD, 4th for LLCE, 1st for LCW and 3rd for MD.

 

Attainment at the higher Outcome 6, increased for all PIs with the exception of Welsh and PSD. The proportion of schools benchmarked in the high or highest quartiles has increased for LCW and PSD, however the proportion is under 50%. The percentage of schools in the higher or highest quartiles have declined for LCE and MD, however the proportion for MD is 50%.

Performance at Outcome 6 exceeded targets for LCE, MD and PSD. Performance did not meet the target for LCW (target 38.28% and performance 35.8%).

 

11. To secure greater improvement there is a need to:

 

Increase the proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quartiles at Outcome 5, particularly PSD, LCE, and MD to above 53%.

Increase the proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quartiles at Outcome 6 in all PIs to above 50%.

 

Progress in Key Stage 2:

Standards have continued to improve at Level 4+, for all PIs and reading writing and mathematics in combination (RWM) (Appendix 4).

The proportion of schools, at L4+, performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, has increased from 56.8% to 61.3% for English and Science, 60% to 80% for Welsh, 50% to 65.9% for Mathematics and 61.3% to 68.1% for the Core Subject Indicator.

 

The Council's rank position for L4+ compared to the other 22 local authorities is 2nd for all PIs

Standards have marginally increased, at L5+, in KS2 for all PIs.

The proportion of schools, at L5+, performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, has increased from 63.6% to 70.5% for English and from 61.4% to 70.5% for Science. The proportion for mathematics has marginally decreased from 68% to 66%.

 

To secure greater improvement in standards in Key Stage 2 there is a need to:

Increase the proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, at Level 4+ year on year.

Increase the proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, at Level 5+ year on year particularly in maths.

 

Progress in KS 3:

Standards have improved significantly at L5+ in all core subjects with the exception of Welsh.

Performance targets for L5+ were met for English, Welsh, science and the CSI. The performance for mathematics 89% was slightly under the target set 89.83%.

 

The LA rank positions for core subjects with the exception of maths are all below the minimum expectation of 6th.

The proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, at L5+, for mathematics and Core Subject Indicator (CSI) has improved to 75% (compared with 62.5% in 2013) of schools are placed in the high or highest benchmarking quarters. For Science 62.5% of schools (compared with 50% in 2013) are placed in the high or highest benchmarking quarters. However, for English and Welsh the proportion has fallen from 75% to 62.5% for English and for Welsh (1 school fallen from quarter 2 to quarter 4).

Standards have improved in KS 3 at L6+ in all PIs.

 

The proportion of schools, performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, at L6+ has improved for Maths from 50% to 75% and stayed at the same level for English at 37.5%, Welsh 100% and Science at 75%.

Standards at L7+ have improved for mathematics and Science from 50% - 62.5%, remained the same for English and decreased for Welsh.

 

The proportion of schools at L7+ performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters has improved for maths to 62.5% and science to 62.5%, but remained static for English at 37.5%. Welsh remains below the median in the benchmarking quarters.

 

12. To secure greater improvement in Key Stage 3 there is a need to:

Increase the proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, at L5+, L6+ and L7+ for all PIs with focus on English and Welsh.

 

13. All secondary schools need to perform well above their Free School Meals (FSM) predicted performance estimates, exceed Welsh Government Model estimates and the most challenging FFT estimates of predicted performance based on prior attainment.

 

14. Additional support bespoke to the needs of School will be a crucial feature of the improvement work, if standards are to continue to improve.

 

Attainment of Free School Meal (FSM) pupils in comparison with Non Free School Meals pupils(Non FSM)

CSI data comparing the performance of children in receipt of FSM with all other pupils is very encouraging. (Appendix 5)

At the Foundation Phase, over a three year period, the gap in performance of children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and those not eligible for FSM closed by 8.4% whilst overall performance increased by 6.3%

At Key Stage 2, over a three year period, the gap in performance of children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and those not eligible for FSM closed by 1.3% whilst overall performance increased by 4.5%

The improvements continue into KS3, over a three year period, the gap in performance of children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and those not eligible for FSM closed by 12.5% whilst overall performance increased by 11.2%

In summary the performance of children eligible for FSMs improved compared the performance of children not eligible for free school meals at Foundation Phase, Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3 whilst at the same time the performance of all children improved.

 

Literacy and Numeracy Assessment Overview.

 

15. The tests assess attainment in reading and numeracy and report in the form of an age standardised score (SS). Scores are categorised to indicate relative competence across an ability range. Scores of less than 85 are regarded as being below the national average range, while scores greater than 115 are regarded as being above the national average range.

 

16. The national reading test results in English and Welsh for the Vale indicates that the proportion of pupils with a score less than 85 is, with another authority, the lowest in Wales for English and the lowest for Welsh; whilst the proportion of pupils scoring above 115 is the 2nd highest in Wales for English and Welsh.

 

17. The Numeracy test consists of two papers, a procedural component and a reasoning component.

 

18. The procedural assessment results indicate that the proportion of pupils with a SS of lower than 85 is the 3rd lowest in Wales and the proportion of pupils scoring greater than 115 is the 2nd highest in Wales.

 

19. In the reasoning component the proportion of pupils scoring less than 85 was the 5th lowest in Wales and the proportion scoring higher than 115 is the 5th highest in Wales.

 

20. Additionally, when available, the data is further broken down to individual school, year group and pupil level; such information is used to inform the type and range of improvement needed by the individual school. School access support from a range of sources including that brokered by the challenge adviser. Progress is closely monitored on a regular basis by the LA and challenge adviser.

 

21. A large degree of coherence must be designed into the overall programme so that one element compliments and reinforces the other.

Resource Implications (Financial and Employment)

22. Met within existing resources through the devolved budget to CSC.

Sustainability and Climate Change Implications

23. High levels of pupil attainment underpin a sustainable economy.

Legal Implications (to Include Human Rights Implications)

24. End of Key Stage Assessment is a statutory obligation.

Crime and Disorder Implications

25. There are no crime and disorder implications.

Equal Opportunities Implications (to include Welsh Language issues)

26. The narrowing of the gap between the performance of children entitled to free school meals and their peers is very encouraging.

Corporate/Service Objectives

27. Improving outcomes and wellbeing for all learners.

Policy Framework and Budget

28. The recommendations in this report are within the existing policy framework and budget.

Consultation (including Ward Member Consultation)

29. Not applicable.

Relevant Scrutiny Committee

30. Lifelong Learning.

Background Papers

None.

Contact Officer

Meryl Plummer Lead Officer for School Improvement

Officers Consulted

Richard Evans

Dr Caryl Stokes (CSC)

Paul Wolstenholme (CSC)

Responsible Officer:

Jennifer Hill, Director of Learning and Skills

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