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Agenda Item No. 5

 

 

THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN COUNCIL

 

SCRUTINY COMMITTEE (LIFELONG LEARNING): 13 OCTOBER 2014

 

REFERENCE FROM CABINET: 6 OCTOBER 2014

 

C2483            SCHOOL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2013/14 FOR END OF FOUNDATION PHASE, KEY STAGE 2 AND KEY STAGE 3 AND AN OVERVIEW OF THE LITERACY AND NUMERACY ASSESSMENTS (CS) (SCRUTINY COMMITTEE – LIFELONG LEARNING) -   

 

Cabinet was informed of pupil attainment and school performance outcomes.

 

The Vale of Glamorgan Council's ambition was that educational outcomes in the Vale were the best in Wales and matched those of the most successful authorities in England with similar socio-economic profiles.

 

In general, the Vale of Glamorgan was advantaged in terms of socio-economic deprivation.  The proportion of pupils entitled to receive free school meals (FSM) was used as a proxy indicator of socio-economic deprivation. In 2013 -14 the Vale ranked 6th lowest overall for the proportion of pupils entitled to receive free school meals (4th lowest at primary level & 6th lowest at secondary level). The findings indicated that the aggregated performance of Vale schools should be significantly higher than for Wales as a whole and always ranked in the 6 highest performing Local Authorities (LAs), as a minimum expectation.

 

Progress in the Foundation Phase:

  •      Indications were that the standards, at Outcome 5 for all PIs, had continued to improve as outlined at Appendix 2, attached to the report.
  •      The proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quartiles for Language Communication Welsh (LCW) and Foundation Phase Outcome Indicator (FPOI) had increased; however, the proportion of schools performing in the  high or highest benchmarking quartiles had marginally decreased for Mathematical Development to 50%.   This decline was replicated in Personal Social Development (PSD) and Language Communication English (LCE) which fell slightly below 50% of the highest and higher benchmarking quartiles 47% and 49% respectively.   
  •      Performance exceeded targets at all PIs at outcome 5  as outlined in Appendix 3, attached to the report. The Council's rank position for Foundation Phase, at the expected outcome 5, compared to the rest of Wales is 4th for the FPOI, 2nd for PSD, 4th for LLCE, 1st for LCW and 3rd for MD.
  •      Attainment at the higher Outcome 6, increased for all PIs with the exception of Welsh and PSD.  The proportion of schools benchmarked in the high or highest quartiles had increased for LCW and PSD, however the proportion was under 50%.  The percentage of schools in the higher or highest quartiles had declined for LCE and MD, however the proportion for MD is 50%. 
  •      Performance at Outcome 6 exceeded targets for LCE, MD and PSD.  Performance did not meet the target for LCW (target 38.28% and performance 35.8%).

 11.       To secure greater improvement there was a need to:

  •       Increase the proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quartiles at Outcome 5, particularly PSD, LCE, and MD to above 53%. 
  •      Increase the proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quartiles at Outcome 6 in all PIs to above 50%.

 Progress in Key Stage 2:

 

  •     Standards had continued to improve at Level 4+, for all PIs and reading writing and mathematics in combination (RWM) (Appendix 4).
  •     The proportion of schools, at L4+, performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, had increased from 56.8% to 61.3% for English and Science, 60% to 80% for Welsh, 50% to 65.9% for Mathematics and 61.3% to 68.1% for the Core Subject Indicator. 
  •     The Council's ranked position for L4+ compared to the other 22 local authorities was 2nd for all PIs 
  •     Standards had marginally increased, at L5+, in KS2 for all PIs. 
  •     The proportion of schools, at L5+, performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, had increased from 63.6% to 70.5% for English and from 61.4% to 70.5% for Science. The proportion for mathematics had marginally decreased from 68% to 66%.

To secure greater improvement in standards in Key Stage 2 there was a need to:

  •     Increase the proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, at Level 4+ year on year.
  •     Increase the proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, at Level 5+ year on year particularly in maths.
  •     Progress in KS 3: 
  •     Standards had improved significantly at L5+ in all core subjects with the exception of Welsh.
  •     Performance targets for L5+ were met for English, Welsh, science and the CSI. The performance for mathematics 89% was slightly under the target set 89.83%.  
  •     The LA rank positions for core subjects with the exception of maths were all below the minimum expectation of 6th.  
  •     The proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, at L5+, for mathematics and Core Subject Indicator (CSI) had improved to 75% (compared with 62.5% in 2013) of schools were placed in the high or highest benchmarking quarters. For Science 62.5% of schools (compared with 50% in 2013) were placed in the high or highest benchmarking quarters.  However, for English and Welsh the proportion had fallen from 75% to 62.5% for English and for Welsh (1 school fallen from quarter 2 to quarter 4). 
  •     Standards had improved in KS 3 at L6+ in all PIs.
  •     The proportion of schools, performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, at L6+ had improved for Maths from 50% to 75% and stayed at the same level for English at 37.5%, Welsh 100% and Science at 75%.
  •     Standards at L7+ had improved for mathematics and Science from 50% - 62.5%, remained the same for English and decreased for Welsh.
  •     The proportion of schools at L7+ performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters had improved for maths to 62.5% and science to 62.5%, but remained static for English at 37.5%.  Welsh remained below the median in the benchmarking quarters.

To secure greater improvement in Key Stage 3 there was a need to:

  •     Increase the proportion of schools performing in the high or highest benchmarking quarters, at L5+, L6+ and L7+ for all PIs with focus on English and Welsh.

All secondary schools needed to perform well above their Free School Meals (FSM) predicted performance estimates, exceed Welsh Government Model estimates and the most challenging FFT estimates of predicted performance based on prior attainment.

 

Additional support bespoke to the needs of School would be a crucial feature of the improvement work, if standards were to continue to improve. Attainment of Free School Meal (FSM) pupils in comparison with Non Free School Meals pupils(Non FSM)

 

  •     CSI data comparing the performance of children in receipt of FSM with all other pupils was very encouraging. as outlined at Appendix 5, attached to the report. 
  •     At the Foundation Phase, over a three year period, the gap in performance of children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and those not eligible for FSM closed by 8.4% whilst overall performance increased by 6.3%
  •     At Key Stage 2, over a three year period, the gap in performance of children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and those not eligible for FSM closed by 1.3% whilst overall performance increased by 4.5%          
  •     The improvements continued into KS3, over a three year period, the gap in performance of children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and those not eligible for FSM closed by 12.5% whilst overall performance increased by 11.2% 
  •     In summary the performance of children eligible for FSMs improved compared the performance of children not eligible for free school meals at Foundation Phase, Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3 whilst at the same time the performance of all children improved.

Literacy and Numeracy Assessment Overview.  

  

The tests assess attainment in reading and numeracy and report in the form of an age standardised score (SS). Scores were categorised to indicate relative competence across an ability range. Scores of less than 85 were regarded as being below the national average range, while scores greater than 115 are regarded as being above the national average range.

 

The national reading test results in English and Welsh for the Vale indicated that the proportion of pupils with a score less than 85 was, with another authority, the lowest in Wales for English and the lowest for Welsh; whilst the proportion of pupils scoring above 115 was the 2nd highest in Wales for English and Welsh.

 

The Numeracy test consiststed of two papers, a procedural component and a reasoning component.

 

The procedural assessment results indicated that the proportion of pupils with a SS of lower than 85 was the 3rd lowest in Wales and the proportion of pupils scoring greater than 115 was the 2nd highest in Wales.

 

In the reasoning component the proportion of pupils scoring less than 85 was the 5th lowest in Wales and the proportion scoring higher than 115 is the 5th highest in Wales.

 

Additionally, when available, the data was further broken down to individual school, year group and pupil level; such information was used to inform the type and range of improvement needed by the individual school. School access support from a range of sources including that brokered by the challenge adviser. Progress was closely monitored on a regular basis by the LA and challenge adviser.

 

A large degree of coherence must be designed into the overall programme so that one element compliments and reinforces the other.

 

This was a matter for Executive decision

 

RESOLVED –

 

(1)       T H A T pupil attainment and school performance outcomes be noted.

 

(2)       T H A T the report be referred to Scrutiny Committee (Lifelong Learning) for information.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

(1)       To note the attainment of pupils and the performance of schools in 2013/14.

 

(2)       To ensure Scrutiny Members considered the pupil attainment and school performance outcomes report.

 

 

 

Attached as Appendix – Report to Cabinet – 6 OCTOBER 2014

 

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